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CDL Practice Test: Tankers

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CDL Practice Test: Tankers

Tankers Questions

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Good Luck!

What is a Bulkhead?
  • A device that is placed on the top of liquid or gas and compresses it as low as possible to decrease the center of gravity
  • Used to hold all liquid or gas to one side of the tank
  • A divider inside a tank to section off liquid or gas
  • Used to elevate liquid to a higher center of gravity
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Some liquid tanks are divided into several smaller tanks by bulkheads. When loading and unloading the smaller tanks, the driver must pay attention to weight distribution. Do not put too much weight on the front or rear of the vehicle.

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What is Liquid Surge?
  • If the tank is punctured, the liquid will rush out of the opening
  • When liquid naturally swirls inside of a tank
  • Results from movement of the liquid in partially filled tanks
  • None of these answers are correct
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Liquid surge results from movement of the liquid in partially filled tanks. This movement can have bad effects on handling. For example, when coming to a stop, the liquid will surge back and forth. When the wave hits the end of the tank, it tends to push the truck in the direction the wave is moving. If the truck is on a slippery surface such as ice, the wave can shove a stopped truck out into an intersection. The driver of a liquid tanker must be very familiar with the handling of the vehicle.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Liquid surge can result from nearly any conceivable movement. Steering left, right, accelerating, or slowing down can all cause liquid to surge. Even after stopping a liquid filled tanker, the liquid will surge back, then forward again, possibly forcing your truck to "jump" forward once more. That's why it's good practice to stay further back from vehicles, even when stopped.

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Regarding stopping distance while driving a tanker, which statement is false?
  • Wet roads double the normal stopping distance
  • All of these statements are true
  • Fully loaded tankers take longer to stop than empty ones
  • Liquid surge may force your truck forward after you have already come to a complete stop
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 85 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Stopping distance - Keep in mind how much space you need to stop your vehicle. Remember that wet roads double the normal stopping distance. Empty tank vehicles may take longer to stop than full ones.

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All of the following tanker-specific inspections are correct, except:
  • Check pipes, connections and hoses for leaks
  • Make sure intake, discharge, and cut-off valves are in the correct position before loading, unloading or moving the vehicle
  • All of these inspections are true and correct
  • Make sure manhole covers and vents have gaskets and that they close correctly
This is a question from page 60 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

On all tank vehicles, the most important item to check for is leaks. Check under and around the vehicle for signs of any leaking. Do not carry liquids or gases in a leaking tank. In general, check the following:

  • Tank body or shell for dents or leaks.
  • Intake, discharge and cut-off valves. Make sure valves are in correct position before loading, unloading or moving the vehicle.
  • Pipes, connections and hoses for leaks, especially around joints.
  • Manhole covers and vents. Make sure covers have gaskets and that they close correctly. Keep vents clear so they work correctly.
  • Special purpose equipment. If your vehicle has any of the following equipment, make sure it works:
    • Vapor recovery kits.
    • Grounding and bonding cables.
    • Emergency shut-off systems.
    • Built-in fire extinguisher.

Make sure you know how to operate your special equipment. Check the emergency equipment required for your vehicle. Find out what equipment you are required to carry and make sure you have it (and it works).

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What is Outage?
  • When liquids condense as they cool
  • When liquids expand as they warm
  • When liquids expand as they cool
  • When liquids condense as they warm
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 85 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Never load a cargo tank totally full. Liquids expand as they warm and you must leave room for the expanding liquid. This is called "outage." Since different liquids expand by different amounts, they require different amounts of outage. You must know the outage requirement when hauling liquids in bulk.

A full tank of dense liquid (such as some acids) may exceed legal weight limits. For that reason, you often may only partially fill tanks with heavy liquids. The amount of liquid to load into a tank depends on:

  • The amount the liquid will expand in transit.
  • The weight of the liquid.
  • Legal weight limits.
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What type of tanker trailers are normally unbaffled?
  • Fuel tankers
  • All tanker trucks are equipped with baffles
  • Tankers designed to haul non-liquid products
  • Food grade tankers
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Unbaffled liquid tankers (sometimes called "smooth bore" tanks) have nothing inside to slow down the flow of the liquid. Therefore, forward-and-back surge is very strong. Unbaffled tanks are usually those that transport food products (e.g., milk). (Sanitation regulations forbid the use of baffles because of the difficulty in cleaning the inside of the tank.) Be extremely cautious (slow and careful) in driving smooth bore tanks, especially when starting and stopping.

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Baffled tanks are:
  • Liquid tanks with several bulkheads containing holes that liquid can flow through
  • Used only for gas products
  • Tanks without any bulkheads
  • Designed to contain several solid bulkheads
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Baffled liquid tanks have bulkheads in them with holes that let the liquid flow through. The baffles help to control the forward and backward liquid surge. Side-to-side surge can still occur. This can cause a roll over.

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How are bulkheads different than baffles?
  • Bulkheads are only allowed in food-grade tankers where baffles can be installed in any type of tanker
  • Baffles are solid barriers in a tanks while bulkheads are barriers with holes in them, allowing liquid to flow through
  • Bulkheads are solid barriers in a tank while baffles are barriers with holes in them, allowing liquid to flow through
  • Bulkheads are only used in gas tankers and baffles are only used in liquid tankers
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Bulkheads: Some liquid tanks are divided into several smaller tanks by bulkheads. When loading and unloading the smaller tanks, the driver must pay attention to weight distribution. Do not put too much weight on the front or rear of the vehicle.


Baffled tanks: Baffled liquid tanks have bulkheads in them with holes that let the liquid flow through. The baffles help to control the forward and backward liquid surge. Side-to-side surge can still occur. This can cause a roll over.

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