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CDL Practice Test: Tankers

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CDL Practice Test: Tankers

Tankers Questions

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Good Luck!

All of the following statements about Liquid Surge are correct, except:
  • When coming to a stop, the liquid will surge back and forth
  • When the surge hits the end of the tank, it tends to push the truck in the opposite direction the wave is moving
  • Results from movement of the liquid in partially filled tanks
  • If the truck is on a slippery surface such as ice, the wave can shove a stopped truck out into an intersection
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Liquid surge results from movement of the liquid in partially filled tanks. This movement can have bad effects on handling. For example, when coming to a stop, the liquid will surge back and forth. When the wave hits the end of the tank, it tends to push the truck in the direction the wave is moving. If the truck is on a slippery surface such as ice, the wave can shove a stopped truck out into an intersection. The driver of a liquid tanker must be very familiar with the handling of the vehicle.

Next
What type of tanker trailers are normally unbaffled?
  • Tankers designed to haul non-liquid products
  • Food grade tankers
  • Fuel tankers
  • All tanker trucks are equipped with baffles
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Unbaffled liquid tankers (sometimes called "smooth bore" tanks) have nothing inside to slow down the flow of the liquid. Therefore, forward-and-back surge is very strong. Unbaffled tanks are usually those that transport food products (e.g., milk). (Sanitation regulations forbid the use of baffles because of the difficulty in cleaning the inside of the tank.) Be extremely cautious (slow and careful) in driving smooth bore tanks, especially when starting and stopping.

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Next
The amount of liquid to load into a tank depends on:
  • The amount the liquid will expand in transit (outage)
  • Legal weight limits
  • The weight of the liquid
  • All of these should be taken into consideration when loading liquid into a tank
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 85 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

A full tank of dense liquid (such as some acids) may exceed legal weight limits. For that reason, you often may only partially fill tanks with heavy liquids. The amount of liquid to load into a tank depends on:

  • The amount the liquid will expand in transit.
  • The weight of the liquid.
  • Legal weight limits.
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Next
When loading a tank, you should:
  • Never load a cargo tank so that it's totally full
  • Expect liquid to evaporate and lighten your gross weight over time
  • Always load a cargo tank with "filler" so that it's completely filled
  • Use disposable baffles and barriers when hauling food grade tankers
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 85 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Never load a cargo tank totally full. Liquids expand as they warm and you must leave room for the expanding liquid. This is called "outage." Since different liquids expand by different amounts, they require different amounts of outage. You must know the outage requirement when hauling liquids in bulk.

A full tank of dense liquid (such as some acids) may exceed legal weight limits. For that reason, you often may only partially fill tanks with heavy liquids. The amount of liquid to load into a tank depends on:

  • The amount the liquid will expand in transit.
  • The weight of the liquid.
  • Legal weight limits.
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Next
What are unbaffled tanks?
  • Liquid is held in place by multiple barriers, restricting liquid surge
  • There are no barriers inside to slow down or stop liquid from surging
  • Small tanks which are loaded and secured onto flatbed trailers
  • There are barriers in the tank with holes in them to slow down and restrict surging liquid
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Unbaffled liquid tankers (sometimes called "smooth bore" tanks) have nothing inside to slow down the flow of the liquid. Therefore, forward-and-back surge is very strong. Unbaffled tanks are usually those that transport food products (e.g., milk). (Sanitation regulations forbid the use of baffles because of the difficulty in cleaning the inside of the tank.) Be extremely cautious (slow and careful) in driving smooth bore tanks, especially when starting and stopping.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Unbaffled tankers are much more dangerous to drive, especially when the tanks aren't completely full, as liquid can surge and slosh around in any direction hindering vehicle control.

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Next
Which statement below is false?
  • Liquid tankers are harder to stop in an emergency than other types of vehicles
  • All tankers have baffle devices to limit sloshing of liquids
  • Liquid tankers are easier to roll over
  • Tanker vehicles have a higher center of gravity
This is a question from page 60 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Hauling liquids in tanks requires special skills because of the high center of gravity and liquid movement. A high center of gravity means that much of the load's weight is carried high up off the road. This makes the vehicle top-heavy and easy to roll over. Liquid tankers are especially easy to roll over. Tests how that tankers can turn over at the speed limits posted for curves. Take highway curves and on-ramp/off-ramp curves well below the posted speed limits.

Prev
Next
Unbaffled liquid tankers are sometimes called:
  • Selective range tanks
  • Free flow tanks
  • Unrestricted tanks
  • Smooth bore tanks
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Unbaffled liquid tankers (sometimes called "smooth bore" tanks) have nothing inside to slow down the flow of the liquid. Therefore, forward-and-back surge is very strong. Unbaffled tanks are usually those that transport food products (e.g., milk). (Sanitation regulations forbid the use of baffles because of the difficulty in cleaning the inside of the tank.) Be extremely cautious (slow and careful) in driving smooth bore tanks, especially when starting and stopping.

Prev
Next
While driving a liquid tanker around a curve, you should:
  • Always drive the posted speed for a curve
  • Be confident that your lower center of gravity will reduce the risk of a rollover
  • Understand that the posted speed for a curve may be too fast for a tank vehicle
  • Use quick steering movements to keep liquids from collecting on one side
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 85 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Curves: Slow down before curves, then accelerate slightly through the curve. The posted speed for a curve may be too fast for a tank vehicle.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

All maneuvers in a tanker truck should be made slower and smoother than other vehicle types.

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