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CDL Practice Test: Tankers

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CDL Practice Test: Tankers

Tankers Questions

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Good Luck!

How are bulkheads different than baffles?
  • Baffles are solid barriers in a tanks while bulkheads are barriers with holes in them, allowing liquid to flow through
  • Bulkheads are only used in gas tankers and baffles are only used in liquid tankers
  • Bulkheads are only allowed in food-grade tankers where baffles can be installed in any type of tanker
  • Bulkheads are solid barriers in a tank while baffles are barriers with holes in them, allowing liquid to flow through
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Bulkheads: Some liquid tanks are divided into several smaller tanks by bulkheads. When loading and unloading the smaller tanks, the driver must pay attention to weight distribution. Do not put too much weight on the front or rear of the vehicle.


Baffled tanks: Baffled liquid tanks have bulkheads in them with holes that let the liquid flow through. The baffles help to control the forward and backward liquid surge. Side-to-side surge can still occur. This can cause a roll over.

Next
Which of these tanker trucks are the least likely to have baffles installed
  • A tank filled with oil
  • A tank carrying milk
  • A tank filled with propane
  • A tank carrying automotive gasoline
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Unbaffled liquid tankers (sometimes called "smooth bore" tanks) have nothing inside to slow down the flow of the liquid. Therefore, forward-and-back surge is very strong. Unbaffled tanks are usually those that transport food products (e.g., milk). (Sanitation regulations forbid the use of baffles because of the difficulty in cleaning the inside of the tank.) Be extremely cautious (slow and careful) in driving smooth bore tanks, especially when starting and stopping.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Baffles make cleaning the inside of a tank vehicle very difficult. Since most food grade tankers have to be completely clean and sanitary before each load, it is very rare for food grade tankers to have baffles.

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Next
What is Outage?
  • When liquids condense as they cool
  • When liquids expand as they warm
  • When liquids condense as they warm
  • When liquids expand as they cool
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 85 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Never load a cargo tank totally full. Liquids expand as they warm and you must leave room for the expanding liquid. This is called "outage." Since different liquids expand by different amounts, they require different amounts of outage. You must know the outage requirement when hauling liquids in bulk.

A full tank of dense liquid (such as some acids) may exceed legal weight limits. For that reason, you often may only partially fill tanks with heavy liquids. The amount of liquid to load into a tank depends on:

  • The amount the liquid will expand in transit.
  • The weight of the liquid.
  • Legal weight limits.
Prev
Next
How much do liquids expand as they warm?
  • None of these answers are correct
  • different liquids expand by different amounts
  • Liquids expand at 1kg/m per 10 degree increase
  • Most liquids do not expand when heated
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 85 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Never load a cargo tank totally full. Liquids expand as they warm and you must leave room for the expanding liquid. This is called "outage." Since different liquids expand by different amounts, they require different amounts of outage. You must know the outage requirement when hauling liquids in bulk.

Prev
Next
What term describes the following statement: Liquids expand as they warm and you must leave room for the expanding liquid.
  • None of these answers are correct
  • Frontage
  • Outage
  • Contraction
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 85 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Liquids expand as they warm and you must leave room for the expanding liquid. This is called "outage."

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Next
On all tank vehicles, the most important item to check for is:
  • Placards (if required) are present and undamaged
  • Grounding and bonding cables are working properly
  • Leaks from the tank
  • Baffles are not damaged
This is a question from page 60 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 84 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

On all tank vehicles, the most important item to check for is leaks. Check under and around the vehicle for signs of any leaking. Do not carry liquids or gases in a leaking tank.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

While there are many other items which can be considered the "most important", most state manuals specifically state that checking for leaks is the most important inspection.

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Next
While driving a liquid tanker around a curve, you should:
  • Always drive the posted speed for a curve
  • Use quick steering movements to keep liquids from collecting on one side
  • Understand that the posted speed for a curve may be too fast for a tank vehicle
  • Be confident that your lower center of gravity will reduce the risk of a rollover
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 85 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Curves: Slow down before curves, then accelerate slightly through the curve. The posted speed for a curve may be too fast for a tank vehicle.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

All maneuvers in a tanker truck should be made slower and smoother than other vehicle types.

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Next
Regarding stopping distance while driving a tanker, which statement is false?
  • Wet roads double the normal stopping distance
  • Fully loaded tankers take longer to stop than empty ones
  • Liquid surge may force your truck forward after you have already come to a complete stop
  • All of these statements are true
This is a question from page 61 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 85 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Stopping distance - Keep in mind how much space you need to stop your vehicle. Remember that wet roads double the normal stopping distance. Empty tank vehicles may take longer to stop than full ones.

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