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CDL Practice Test: Weight & Balance

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CDL Practice Test: Weight & Balance

Weight & Balance Questions

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Good Luck!

Using 7 miles per gallon as your fuel mileage and 8 pounds per gallon for the weight of fuel, how much total fuel weight will you burn off in 210 miles?
  • 270 pounds
  • 240 pounds
  • 180 pounds
  • 210 pounds
This is a question from page 117 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

To figure out how many gallons of fuel you'll burn off, simply divide the number of miles travelled by the miles per gallon

Number of miles travelled / miles per gallon = gallons of fuel burned off

TruckingTruth's Advice:

210 miles travelled / 7 miles per gallon = 30 gallons of fuel burned off

30 gallons x 8 pounds per gallon = 240 pounds of fuel burned off
Next
What are the two most common tandem slider rail hole spacings, and roughly how much weight is transferred per hole?
  • 4 inches apart - 250 pounds per hole
    6 inches apart - 400 pounds per hole
  • 6 inches apart - 250 pounds per hole
    10 inches apart - 500 pounds per hole
  • 4 inches apart - 450 pounds per hole
    6 inches apart - 200 pounds per hole
  • 6 inches apart - 350 pounds per hole
    8 inches apart - 550 pounds per hole
This is a question from page 113 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The two main hole spacings you'll find are 4 inches and 6 inches. You can estimate that you will move 250 pounds per hole for 4 inch spacing, and 400 pounds per hole for 6 inch spacing.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

There will be some variance here, but generally speaking these are very good estimates and they work very well. You'll learn to recognize the spacing by glancing at them eventually, but in the beginning you might want to measure quick so you know how far to slide the tandems.
Prev
Next
What are the two primary laws governing the placement of the tandems?
  • The Bridge Formula and the maximum allowed length from Kingpin to trailer tandems.
  • The overall gross weight of the vehicle and the maximum percentage of weight on trailer tandems
  • The maximum width of 8' 6" on Interstate Highways and the maximum trailer length law
  • The tire load rating of the drive axle tires and the minimum clearance law
This is a question from page 111 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The two primary laws governing the placement of the tandems are the Bridge Formula and the maximum allowed length from Kingpin to trailer tandems.
Prev
Next
Based on the following figures, how much fuel can you legally add while remaining legal on the steer axle?

Load rating of steer tires: 6,150 pounds
Percentage of fuel weight to steer axle: 80%
Steer axle weight limit in states you're travelling: 20,000 pounds
Weight Before Fueling: Steer: 11,450, drives: 33,100, gross: 76,700
  • 132.81 gallons
  • 146 gallons
  • 119.5 gallons
  • 121.25 gallons
This is a question from page 116 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Once you know your current axle weights and the percentage of fuel weight that goes on the steer axle, you can use this formula you can calculate the amount of fuel you can take on:

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Because your steer tires are rated at 6,150 and the legal weight limit is 20,000 pounds for the steer axle in the states you're travelling in, the most restrictive law would be to not exceed the tire load rating. In this case, you can have 12,300 on your steer axle. Right now you have 11,450 on your steer axle, which means you can add 850 pounds to your steer axle and still be legal.

Because we know that 80% of the weight of fuel will go to the steer axle and you can add 850 pounds to your steer axle, we can plug the numbers into the formula above.

850/80 = 10.62
10.62 x 100 = 1062
1062/8 = 132.75 gallons of fuel you can add
Prev
Next
What is the best way to determine what percentage of the weight of fuel will go to each set of axles?
  • Ask another driver what their numbers are
  • Simply go by the number of gallons of fuel each tank holds
  • Weigh the truck immediately before and after fueling, and do a simple calculation
  • The percentage is standardized amongst manufacturers and is the same for every truck
This is a question from page 115 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The best way to determine what percentage of your fuel will go to each set of axles is to weigh the truck immediately before and after fueling, and do a simple calculation
Prev
Next
Using the following numbers, what would be the final result if you moved the 5th wheel forward two holes?

steer axle: 10,800 pounds
drive axles: 34,100 pounds
Weight transfer: 500 pounds per hole
  • steer axle: 11,300 pounds
    drive axles: 33,600 pounds
  • steer axle: 10,300 pounds
    drive axles: 34,600 pounds
  • steer axle: 11,800 pounds
    drive axles: 33,100 pounds
  • steer axle: 9,800 pounds
    drive axles: 35,100 pounds
This is a question from page 118 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

If you slide the 5th wheel toward the nose of the tractor you will increase the weight on the steer axle and take weight off the drive axles.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

If you move it forward 2 holes, then:

2 holes x 500 pounds per hole = 1000 pounds of weight transfer from the drive axles to the steer axle.

10,800 + 1000 = 11,800 pounds on the steer axle after transfer

34,100 - 1000 = 33,100 pounds on the drive axles after transfer
Prev
Next
Based on the following figures, how much fuel can you legally add while remaining legal on the drive axles?

Percentage of fuel weight to drive axles: 30%
Weight Before Fueling: Steer: 11,275, drives: 33,750, gross: 77,220
  • 104.16 gallons of fuel
  • 88.5 gallons of fuel
  • 110 gallons of fuel
  • 112.75 gallons of fuel
This is a question from page 116 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Once you know your current axle weights and the percentage of fuel weight that goes on the drive axles, you can use this formula to calculate the amount of fuel you can take on:

TruckingTruth's Advice:

We know that 30% of the weight of fuel will go to the drive axles and you have 250 pounds you can add to the weight of the drive axles and remain legal. So plugging these numbers into the formula, you get:

250/30 = 8.33
8.33x100 = 833
833/8 = 104.13 gallons of fuel you can add
Prev
Next
What are the four basic weight limits?
  • single axle, tandem axle, single tire, eight tire
  • single tire, bridge formula, tri-axle, gross vehicle
  • single axle, tandem axle, bridge formula, and gross vehicle
  • double spacing, single axle, bridge forumula, overweight
This is a question from page 109 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

There are four basic weight limits: single axle, tandem axle, bridge formula, and gross vehicle.
Prev
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[2,1,1,1,3,3,1,3]
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