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CDL Practice Test: Weight & Balance

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CDL Practice Test: Weight & Balance

Weight & Balance Questions

Click On The Picture To Begin

Good Luck!

What is the main factor that will limit how far back you can slide your tandems?
  • The overall height to length ratio of the cargo in the trailer
  • The distance between your steer axle and drive axles or "tractor length rating"
  • The load rating of your drive tires
  • The maximum legal length allowed between your trailer kingpin and your trailer tandems
This is a question from page 110 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The maximum legal length allowed between your trailer kingpin and your trailer tandems will limit how far back you can slide your tandems

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Different states have different laws regarding the maximum length allowed from your kingpin to your trailer tandems and you can look up these values in the Rand McNally Motor Carrier's Atlas
Next
Using the following numbers for your calculations, how much weight will come off your steer axle?

Miles per gallon: 7
Miles travelled: 280
Percenatage of fuel weight on steer axle: 80%
  • 300 pounds
  • 256 pounds
  • 280 pounds
  • 310 pounds
This is a question from page 117 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

To calculate the percentage of a value, you simply multiply the total value times the percentage you're looking for, and then divide by 100.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

If you're getting 7 miles per gallon and you travel 280 miles:

280/7 = 40 gallons of fuel

40 gallons x 8 pounds per gallon = 320 pounds of total fuel burned off

Since 80% of the weight of fuel goes on our steer axle, we need to know what 80% of 320 is:

80 x 320 / 100 = 256 pounds coming off the steer axle
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Next
Sliding your trailer tandems toward the front or back of the vehicle will primarily change the weight distribution between which sets of axles?
  • It only removes weight from the trailer tandems
  • The steer axle and the trailer tandems
  • The tractor's drive axles and the trailer tandems.
  • The tractor's drive axles and the steer axle
This is a question from page 113 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Sliding your trailer tandems toward the front or back of the vehicle will primarily change the weight distribution between the tractor's drive axles and the trailer tandems.
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Next
What are the four basic weight limits?
  • single tire, bridge formula, tri-axle, gross vehicle
  • single axle, tandem axle, bridge formula, and gross vehicle
  • double spacing, single axle, bridge forumula, overweight
  • single axle, tandem axle, single tire, eight tire
This is a question from page 109 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

There are four basic weight limits: single axle, tandem axle, bridge formula, and gross vehicle.
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Next
What is the main factor affecting the low-speed offtracking of a tractor trailer?
  • The ratio of the length of the tractor to the length of the trailer
  • The length of the trailer, regardless of the position of the trailer tandems
  • The distance from the steer axle to the drive axles
  • The distance from the trailer kingpin to the center of the trailer rear axle
This is a question from page 111 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

When a combination vehicle makes a low-speed turn - for example a 90-degree turn at an intersection - the wheels of the rearmost trailer axle follow a path several feet inside the path of the tractor steering axle. This is called low-speed offtracking. Excessive low-speed offtracking may make it necessary for the driver to swing wide into adjacent lanes to execute the turn (that is, to avoid climbing the inside curbs or striking fixed objects like telephone poles).

This performance attribute is affected primarily by the distance from the trailer kingpin to the center of the trailer rear axle, otherwise known as the wheelbase of the semitrailer. To prevent trucks from being too long to maneuvering safely around turns encountered in cities and towns, the maximum length allowed from the kingpin to the trailer tandems is set by the individual states.

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Next
In the following picture, what are axles 4 and 5 commonly referred to as?
  • "back set" or "rear tandems"
  • "trailer drives" or "back tandems"
  • "trailer set" or "back tandems"
  • "tandems" or "trailer tandems"
This is a question from page 110 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

#4 and #5 together are your trailer tandem axles (commonly referred to as "tandems" or "trailer tandems")

TruckingTruth's Advice:

You'll generally hear drivers refer to these axles as simply "tandems". They'll say "The load I had yesterday was loaded incorrectly and I was overweight on my 'tandems' ".
Prev
Next
What is the correct method of determining what percentage of fuel is distributed between the steer axle and the drive axles?
  • Weigh the truck after running 100 miles, then immediately fuel up, and then re-weigh the truck to see what percentage of the added weight went to the steer axle, and what percentage went to the drive axles.
  • Weigh the truck immediately after fueling, then run exactly 100 miles, and then re-weigh the truck to see what percentage of the added weight came off the steer axles.
  • Weigh the truck, then immediately fuel up, and then immediately re-weigh the truck to see what percentage of the added weight went to the steer axle, and what percentage went to the drive axles.
  • Weigh the truck, then drive exactly 100 miles, and then re-weigh the truck to see what percentage of the added weight went to the steer axle, and what percentage went to the drive axles.
This is a question from page 115 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

In order to accurately determine what percentage of fuel weight goes to your steer axle versus your drive axles you can simply weight the truck, then immediately fuel up, and then immediately re-weigh the truck to see what percentage of the added weight went to the steer axle, and what percentage went to the drive axles.
Prev
Next
You weigh the truck immediately before and after fueling. Based on the following, determine what percentage of the weight goes to each set of axles:

Before fueling:
steer: 11,450, drives: 33,100, gross: 76,700
After fueling:
steer:11,850, drives: 33,300, gross: 77,300
  • 73% went on the steer axle
    27% went on the drive axles
  • 67% went on the steer axle
    33% went on the drive axles
  • 75% went on the steer axle
    25% went on the drive axles
  • 88% went on the steer axle
    12% went on the drive axles
This is a question from page 115 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

To determine the percentage of fuel weight added to the steer axle, take the weight added to the steer axle, divide it by the total fuel weight added (determined by the change in the gross weight), and then multiply that times 100

TruckingTruth's Advice:

To determine the percentage of fuel weight added to the steer axle, take the weight added to the steer axle (400 pounds), divide it by the total fuel weight added (600 pounds), and then multiply that times 100

400/600 = .67

.67 * 100 = 67% fuel weight to the steer tires

100% - 67% = 33% went on the drive axles.
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[4,2,3,2,4,4,3,2]
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