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Safe Driving Free CDL Practice Tests
Page 14

Prepare For The Safe Driving Portion Of Your CDL Written Exams

Safe Driving Questions

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Good Luck!

All lights and reflectors should be operating properly, clean, and:
  • The proper shape
  • Round
  • Red
  • The proper color
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Rear:

Lights and reflectors:

  • Rear clearance and identification lights clean, operating and proper color (red at rear).
  • Reflectors clean and proper color (red at rear).
  • Taillights clean, operating and proper color (red at rear).
  • Right rear turn signal operating and proper color (red, yellow or amber at rear).
  • License plate(s) present, clean and secured.
  • Splash guards present, not damaged, properly fastened, not dragging on ground or rubbing tires.
  • Cargo secure (trucks).
  • Cargo properly blocked, braced, tied, chained, etc.
  • Tailboards up and properly secured.
  • End gates free of damage and properly secured in stake sockets.
  • Canvas or tarp (if required) properly secured to prevent tearing, billowing or blocking of either the rearview mirrors or rear lights.
  • If over length or over width, make sure all signs and/or additional lights/flags are safely and properly mounted and all required permits are in driver's possession.
  • Rear doors securely closed, latched/locked.
Next
Make sure that splash guards are properly fastened, and not:
  • Distracting
  • Dirty
  • Orange
  • Dragging on the ground
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Rear:

Lights and reflectors:

  • Rear clearance and identification lights clean, operating and proper color (red at rear).
  • Reflectors clean and proper color (red at rear).
  • Taillights clean, operating and proper color (red at rear).
  • Right rear turn signal operating and proper color (red, yellow or amber at rear).
  • License plate(s) present, clean and secured.
  • Splash guards present, not damaged, properly fastened, not dragging on ground or rubbing tires.
  • Cargo secure (trucks).
  • Cargo properly blocked, braced, tied, chained, etc.
  • Tailboards up and properly secured.
  • End gates free of damage and properly secured in stake sockets.
  • Canvas or tarp (if required) properly secured to prevent tearing, billowing or blocking of either the rearview mirrors or rear lights.
  • If over length or over width, make sure all signs and/or additional lights/flags are safely and properly mounted and all required permits are in driver's possession.
  • Rear doors securely closed, latched/locked.
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Next
Turn signals facing the front should be amber or:
  • White
  • Blue
  • Green
  • Red
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From The CDL Manual

Get Out and Check Lights:

Left front turn signal light clean, operating and proper color (amber or white on signals facing the front).

Left rear turn signal light and both stop lights clean, operating and proper color (red, yellow or amber).

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Service brake stopping action should be tested at:
  • 5 mph
  • 25 mph
  • Night
  • 55 mph
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From The CDL Manual

Test Service Brake Stopping Action:

  • Go about 5 miles per hour.
  • Push brake pedal firmly.
  • "Pulling" to one side or the other can mean brake trouble.
  • Any unusual brake pedal "feel" or delayed stopping action can mean trouble.
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Mirror adjustment can only be checked accurately when:
  • The trailer is at a 45 degree angle
  • The truck is in motion
  • You are outside the vehicle
  • The trailer is straight
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From The CDL Manual

Mirror Adjustment

Mirror adjustment should be checked prior to the start of any trip and can only be checked accurately when the trailer(s) are straight. You should check and adjust each mirror to show some part of the vehicle. This will give you a reference point for judging the position of the other images.

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Drivers should be aware that convex mirrors will make reflections look:
  • Larger and closer
  • Larger and farther away
  • Smaller and farther away
  • Smaller and closer
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From The CDL Manual

Many large vehicles have curved (convex, "fisheye," "spot," "bugeye") mirrors that show a wider area than flat mirrors. This is often helpful, but be aware that everything appears smaller in a convex mirror than it would if you were looking at it directly.

Things also seem farther away than they really are. It is important to realize this and to allow for it. Figure 2.7 shows the field of vision using a convex mirror.

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When changing lanes, put you turn signal on, and:
  • Change lanes quickly before any other vehicle come up
  • Change lanes slowly and smoothly
  • Wave cars behind you around
  • Tap the brakes repeatedly
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From The CDL Manual

Lane Changes

Put your turn signal on before changing lanes. Change lanes slowly and smoothly. A driver you did not see may have a chance to honk his/her horn or avoid your vehicle.

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The distance the truck will travel between noticing a hazard and hitting the brakes is:
  • Perception distance
  • Braking distance
  • Total stopping distance
  • Reaction distance
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Reaction distance

The distance you will continue to travel, in ideal conditions; before you physically hit the brakes in response to a hazard seen ahead. The average driver has a reaction time of 3/4 second to one second. At 55 mph this accounts for 61 feet traveled.

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The principal way of controlling speed on downgrades is:
  • The braking effect of the engine
  • The emergency brake
  • The foot brakes
  • Swerving back and forth
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

If a speed limit is posted or there is a sign indicating "Maximum Safe Speed," never exceed the speed shown. Also, look for and heed warning signs indicating the length and steepness of the grade. You must use the braking effect of the engine as the principal way of controlling your speed on downgrades. The braking effect of the engine is greatest when it is near the governed rpms and the transmission is in the lower gears.

Save your brakes so you will be able to slow or stop as required by road and traffic conditions. Shift your transmission to a low gear before starting down the grade and use the proper braking techniques. Please read carefully the section on going down long, steep downgrades safely in "Mountain Driving."

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If you are being tailgated, you should not:
  • Speed up
  • Flash your brake lights
  • Change lanes quickly
  • Do any of these things
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

If you are being tailgated, do the following to reduce the chances of a crash:

  • Avoid quick changes If you have to slow down or turn, signal early and reduce speed gradually.
  • Increase your following distance Opening up room in front of you will help you avoid having to make sudden speed or direction changes. It also makes it easier for the tailgater to get around you.
  • Do not speed up It is safer to be tailgated at a low speed than a high speed.
  • Avoid tricks Do not turn on your taillights or flash your brake lights. Follow the suggestions above.
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