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Safe Driving Free CDL Practice Tests
Page 5

Prepare For The Safe Driving Portion Of Your CDL Written Exams

Safe Driving Questions

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Minimum tread depth on every groove on all tires must be at least:
  • 4/32-inch
  • 1/2-inch
  • 2/32-inch
  • 3/8-inch
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From The CDL Manual

Tires:

Make sure you have enough tread on your tires. The drive tires must provide traction to push the rig over wet pavement and through snow. The steering tires must have traction to steer the vehicle. Enough tread is especially important in winter conditions.

You must have at least 4/32 inch tread depth in every major groove on front tires and at least 2/32 inch on other tires. More is better. Use a gauge to determine if you have enough tread for safe driving.

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Snow and ice must be removed from the radiator because otherwise:
  • Aerodynamics will be poor
  • Birds will get caught in the radiator
  • It may fly off and hit someone
  • The engine may overheat and stop
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From The CDL Manual

Radiator shutters and winterfront:

Remove ice from the radiator shutters. Make sure the winterfront is not closed too tightly. If the shutters freeze shut or the winterfront is closed too much, the engine may overheat and stop.

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When starting in slippery conditions, you should:
  • Spin the tires for traction
  • Drive quickly and swerve
  • Roll backwards if possible
  • Start gently and slowly
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From The CDL Manual

Slippery surfaces:

Drive slowly and smoothly on slippery roads. If it is very slippery, you should not drive at all. Stop at the first safe place. Following are safety guidelines:

Start gently and slowly – When first starting, get the feel of the road. Do not hurry.

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To adjust driving space to slippery conditions, all of the following are space considerations except:
  • Drive alongside other vehicles whenever possible
  • Keep a longer following distance.
  • When you see a traffic jam ahead, slow down or stop to wait for it to clear.
  • Try hard to anticipate stops early and slow down gradually.
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Adjust space to conditions –

Do not drive alongside other vehicles. Keep a longer following distance. When you see a traffic jam ahead, slow down or stop to wait for it to clear. Try hard to anticipate stops early and slow down gradually.

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It is safe to remove the radiator cap or any other part of the pressurized system:
  • At any time
  • When the system has cooled
  • Only at night
  • As soon as the engine is shut off
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From The CDL Manual

Never remove the radiator cap or any part of the pressurized system until the system has cooled. Steam and boiling water can spray under pressure and cause severe burns. If you can touch the radiator cap with your bare hand, it is probably cool enough to open.

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In addition to preventing engine freezing, proper coolant levels help:
  • Prevent engine over-heating
  • Lubricate the engine
  • Keep the boss off your back
  • Fuel mileage
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From The CDL Manual

Before starting out, make sure the engine cooling system has enough water and antifreeze according to the engine manufacturer’s directions. (Antifreeze helps the engine under hot conditions as well as cold conditions.)

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When driving in very hot weather, it is critically important to carefully inspect:
  • Hoses & belts
  • Tires
  • All of these things should be specifically inspected when driving in hot weather
  • Oil & coolant
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Tires:

Check the tire mounting and air pressure. Inspect the tires every two hours or every 100 miles when driving in very hot weather. Air pressure increases with temperature. Do not let air out or the pressure will be too low when the tires cool off. If a tire is too hot to touch, remain stopped until the tire cools off. Otherwise the tire may blow out or catch fire. A burning tire should be cooled with water.

Engine oil:

The engine oil helps keep the engine cool, as well as lubricates it. Make sure there is enough engine oil. If you have an oil temperature gauge, make sure the temperature is within the proper range while you are driving.

Engine coolant:

Before starting out, make sure the engine cooling system has enough water and antifreeze according to the engine manufacturer’s directions. (Antifreeze helps the engine under hot conditions as well as cold conditions.) When driving, check the water temperature or coolant temperature gauge from time to time. Make sure it remains in the normal range. If the gauge goes above the highest safe temperature, there may be something wrong that could lead to engine failure and possibly fire. Stop driving as soon as safely possible and try to find out what is wrong.

Engine belts:

Learn how to check V-belt tightness on your vehicle by pressing on the belts. Loose belts will not turn the water pump and/or fan properly. This will result in overheating. Also check belts for cracking or other signs of wear.

Hoses:

Make sure coolant hoses are in good condition. A broken hose while driving can lead to engine failure and even fire.

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When approaching a railroad crossing, which of these safety precautions applies?
  • Shift on the tracks to help get across
  • Use your vision, and never rely only on warning signals, gates, or flagmen
  • Double tracks present no additional safety concerns compared to single tracks
  • Stopping on the tracks is acceptable in heavy traffic
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Do not rely solely upon the presence of warning signals, gates, or flagmen to warn of approaching trains.

DO NOT shift gears while crossing railroad tracks.

Double tracks require a double check. A train on one track may hide a train on the other track. Look both ways before crossing. After one train has cleared a crossing, be sure no other trains are near before starting across the tracks.

Never permit traffic conditions to trap you in a position where you have to stop on the tracks. Be sure you can get all the way across the tracks before you start across.

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Coming down steep, long, downgrades will require a driver to:
  • All of these are important considerations
  • Use a low gear
  • Select an appropriate safe speed
  • Use proper braking techniques
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

In coming down long, steep downgrades, gravity causes the speed of your vehicle to increase. You must select an appropriate safe speed, then use a low gear, and use proper braking techniques. Plan ahead and obtain information about any long steep grades along your planned route of travel. If possible, talk to other drivers who are familiar with the grades to find out what speeds are safe.

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"Brake fade" is:
  • When older brake linings start changing colors
  • When one side brakes better than the other
  • A condition in which your brakes overheat and don't operate properly
  • The foot pedal shakes when applied
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

You must go slow enough so your brakes can hold you back without getting too hot. If the brakes become too hot, they may start to “fade.” This means you have to apply them harder and harder to get the same stopping power. If you continue to use the brakes hard, they can keep fading until you cannot slow down or stop at all.

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