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Safe Driving Free CDL Practice Tests
Page 7

Prepare For The Safe Driving Portion Of Your CDL Written Exams

Safe Driving Questions

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Among other hazards, drivers should be on the lookout for slow or confused drivers, children, accidents, and:
  • Low-flying airplanes
  • Drivers in a hurry
  • Migrating geese
  • Misspelled highway signs
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Drivers in a hurry –

Drivers may feel your commercial vehicle is preventing them from getting where they want to go on time. Such drivers may pass you without a safe gap in the oncoming traffic, cutting too close in front of you. Drivers entering the road may pull in front of you to avoid being stuck behind you, causing you to brake. Be aware of this and watch for drivers who are in a hurry.

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A sign of a confused driver who may present a potential hazard is:
  • Hesitation: frequently using brakes or driving slowly
  • All of these should be clues that the driver may do something unexpected out of confusion
  • Touristy things like out-of-state license plates and luggage on top of the car
  • Drivers who are looking at maps, street signs, or house numbers
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Confused drivers –

Confused drivers often change direction suddenly or stop without warning. Confusion is common near freeway or turnpike interchanges and major intersections. Tourists unfamiliar with the area can be very hazardous. Clues to tourists include car-top luggage and out-of-state license plates. Unexpected actions (stopping in the middle of a block, changing lanes for no apparent reason, back-up lights suddenly going on) are clues to confusion. Hesitation is another clue, including driving very slowly, using brakes often or stopping in the middle of an intersection. You also may see drivers looking at street signs, maps and house numbers. These drivers may not be paying attention to you.

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Impaired drivers who present potential hazards may tend to:
  • Open the window in cold weather
  • Stop at the wrong time
  • Weave and drift across the road
  • These are all signs that the driver may be impaired and dangerous
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Impaired drivers –

Drivers who are sleepy, have had too much to drink, are on drugs, or are ill are hazards. Some clues to these drivers include:

  • Weaving across the road or drifting from one side to another.
  • Leaving the road (dropping right wheels onto the shoulder, or bumping across a curb in a turn).
  • Stopping at the wrong time (stopping at a green light, or waiting too long at a stop).
  • Open window in cold weather.
  • Speeding up or slowing down suddenly, driving too fast or too slow.

Be alert for drunk drivers and sleepy drivers late at night.

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Why should drivers always be looking for hazards?
  • To prevent them from becoming emergencies
  • So they can tell good stories later
  • Their boss is watching
  • They get paid more for finding them
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

You should always be looking for hazards. Continue to learn to see hazards on the road. However, do not forget why you are looking for the hazards – they may turn into emergencies.

You look for hazards in order to have time to plan a way out of any emergency. When you see a hazard, think about the emergencies that could develop and figure out what you would do.

Always be prepared to take action based on your plans. This way, you will be a prepared, defensive driver who will improve not only your own safety but the safety of everyone on the road.

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When turning quickly in an emergency, which of the following applies:
  • Lay on the air horn
  • Don't look too far ahead
  • Do not apply the brakes
  • Turn the wheel as far as it will go
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Turning quickly:

To turn quickly, you must have a firm grip on the steering wheel with both hands. A quick turn can be made safely if it is done correctly.

  • Do not apply the brakes while you are turning. It is very easy to lock your wheels while turning. If that happens, you may skid out of control.
  • Do not turn any more than needed to clear whatever is in your way. The more sharply you turn, the greater the chances of a skid or rollover.
  • Be prepared to “countersteer,” that is, to turn the wheel back in the other direction once you have passed whatever was in your path. Unless you are prepared to countersteer, you will not be able to do it quickly enough. Think of emergency steering and countersteering as two parts of one driving action.
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Generally, when steering in an emergency, which direction is your best option?
  • Into the median
  • A quick left, then right
  • To your left
  • To your right
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Where to steer:

If an oncoming driver has drifted into your lane, a move to your right is best. If that driver realizes what has happened, the natural response will be to return to his/her own lane. If something is blocking your path, the best direction to steer will depend on the situation.

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Why should you try to move to your right when steering in an emergency?
  • If you are blocked on both sides, a move to the right may be best. At least you will not force anyone into an opposing traffic lane and a possible head-on collision.
  • All of these are good reasons
  • If the shoulder is clear, going right may be best. No one is likely to be driving on the shoulder, but someone may be passing you on the left.
  • If you have been using your mirrors, you will know which lane is empty and can be safely used.
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Where to steer:

If an oncoming driver has drifted into your lane, a move to your right is best. If that driver realizes what has happened, the natural response will be to return to his/her own lane. If something is blocking your path, the best direction to steer will depend on the situation.

  • If you have been using your mirrors, you will know which lane is empty and can be safely used.
  • If the shoulder is clear, going right may be best. No one is likely to be driving on the shoulder, but someone may be passing you on the left. You will know if you have been using your mirrors.
  • If you are blocked on both sides, a move to the right may be best. At least you will not force anyone into an opposing traffic lane and a possible head-on collision.
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Instead of stopping in an emergency, what is many times the safer action?
  • Steering away from it
  • Making a very fast u-turn
  • Using the horn to make people move
  • Do nothing and hope for the best
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Steering to Avoid a Crash —

Stopping is not always the safest thing to do in an emergency. When you do not have enough room to stop, you may have to steer away from what is ahead. Remember, you can almost always turn to miss an obstacle more quickly than you can stop. (However, top-heavy vehicles and tractors with multiple trailers may overturn.)

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If you are forced to leave the road in an emergency, all of these are good guidelines except:
  • Avoid braking if possible
  • Swerve to get off the road as soon as possible
  • If possible, keep one set of wheels on the road
  • Try to stay on the shoulder
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Leaving the road:

In some emergencies, you may have to drive off the road. It may be less risky than facing a collision with another vehicle. Most shoulders are strong enough to support the weight of a large vehicle and, therefore, offer an available escape route. Following are guidelines if you must leave the road:

  • Avoid braking – If possible, avoid using the brakes until your speed has dropped to about 20 mph. Then brake very gently to avoid skidding on a loose surface.
  • Keep one set of wheels on pavement if possible – This helps to maintain control of the vehicle.
  • Stay on the shoulder – If the shoulder is clear, stay on it until your vehicle has come to a complete stop. Signal and check your mirrors before pulling back onto the road.
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Using controlled braking, brakes are applied as hard as possible:
  • While steering hard-right
  • While steering hard-left
  • Without locking the wheels
  • While also stepping on the gas
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Controlled braking:

With this method, you apply the brakes as hard as you can without locking the wheels. Keep steering wheel movements very small while doing this. If you need to make a larger steering adjustment or if the wheels lock, release the brakes. Reapply the brakes as soon as you can.

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