CDL Practice Tests For Flatbed Cargo Securement Page 11

Flatbed Cargo Securement Practice Questions

Click On The Picture To Begin

Good Luck!

Given that general cargo securement requires a WLL of at least 50% of cargo weight, how many 11mm wire rope tiedowns would be required for a load of 26,000 lbs?
  • 2
  • 1
  • 4
  • 3
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

WIRE ROPE (6 x 37, Fiber Core)
  • Diameter:
  • 7 mm (1/4 in)
  • 8 mm (5/16 in)
  • 10 mm (3/8 in)
  • 11 mm(7/16in)
  • 13 mm (1/2 in)
  • 16 mm (5/8 in)
  • 20 mm (3/4 in)
  • 22 mm (7/8 in)
  • 25 mm (1 in)
  • WLL:
  • 640 kg (1400 lb.)
  • 950 kg (2100 lb.)
  • 1360 kg (3000 lb.)
  • 1860 kg (4100 lb.)
  • 2400 kg (5300 lb.)
  • 3770 kg (8300 lb.)
  • 4940 kg(10900 lb.)
  • 7300 kg(16100 lb.)
  • 9480 kg(20900 lb.)
Next
The North American Cargo Securement Standard cover vehicles weighing:
  • 26,001 lbs
  • Over 4,500 lbs
  • Over 10,000 lbs
  • Less than 10,000 lbs
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

North American Cargo Securement Standard

What does the Standard cover? (Section 1.1)

    Vehicles

  • Commercial vehicles (including a combination of vehicles) that are operated on a highway and have a gross vehicle rating over 4,500 kg (10,000 lb.)
Prev
Next
The load carrying area of a truck, trailer, or intermodal container is referred to as the:
  • Deck
  • Bulkhead
  • Well
  • Headboard
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Deck:

The load carrying area of a truck, trailer, or intermodal container.

Prev
Next
An anchor point is defined as:
  • A vertical barrier across the front of the deck of a vehicle to prevent forward movement of cargo.
  • Part of the structure, fitting, or attachment on a vehicle or cargo to which a tiedown is attached.
  • A rail along the side of a vehicle that protects the side of the vehicle from impacts.
  • The load carrying area of a truck, trailer, or intermodal container.
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Anchor point:

Part of the structure, fitting, or attachment on a vehicle or cargo to which a tiedown is attached.

Prev
Next
In cargo securement, a wedge is defined as:
  • The depression formed between two cylindrical articles when they are laid with their eyes horizontal and parallel against each other.
  • A short piece of material, usually wood, nailed to the deck to reinforce blocking.
  • A rail along the side of a vehicle that protects the side of the vehicle from impacts.
  • A tapered piece of material, thick at one end and thin at the other, used to help keep cargo from moving.
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Wedge:

A tapered piece of material, thick at one end and thin at the other, used to help keep cargo from moving.

Prev
Next
Cargo securement for a load weighing 37,000 lbs must be able to withstand a minimum forward braking force of:
  • 7,400 lbs
  • 18,500 lbs
  • 29,600 lbs
  • 10,000 lbs
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

How well must the securement system work? (Section 1.3)

Each cargo securement system must be able to withstand a minimum amount of force in each direction.

  • Forward Force = 80% of cargo weight when braking while driving straight ahead.
  • Rearward Force = 50% of cargo weight when accelerating, shifting gears while climbing a hill, or braking in reverse.
  • Sideways Force = 50% of cargo weight when turning, changing lanes, or braking while turning.
  • Upward Force = 20% of cargo weight when traveling over bumps in the road or cresting a hill.
    • This requirement is satisfied when the cargo is "Fully Contained."

TruckingTruth's Advice:

37,000 x 80% = 29,600 lbs.
Prev
Next
When calculating directional forces, 'g' is expressed as:
  • The maximum load that may be applied to a component of a cargo securement system during normal service, usually assigned by the manufacturer of the component.
  • The acceleration due to gravity, 9.823 m/sec2 (32.2 ft/sec2). For cargo securement purposes it is expressed as a percentage of cargo weight, i.e. .5g is 50% of force of gravity or 50% of cargo weight.
  • The maximum load that may be applied to a component of a cargo securement system during normal service, usually assigned by the manufacturer of the component.
  • The summation of the working load limits or restraining capacity of all devices used to secure an article on a vehicle.
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

g:

The acceleration due to gravity, 9.823 m/sec2 (32.2 ft/sec2). For cargo securement purposes it is expressed as a percentage of cargo weight, i.e. .5g is 50% of force of gravity or 50% of cargo weight.

Prev
Next
If you were instructed to 'tarp' a load, what would you be using?
  • A platform or tray on which cargo is placed so that it can be handled as an article.
  • A strip of material that may be used to unitize articles and is tensioned and clamped or crimped back upon itself.
  • A waterproof sheet used to cover cargo.
  • A short piece of material, usually wood, nailed to the deck to reinforce blocking.
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Tarp:

A waterproof sheet used to cover cargo.

Prev
Next
What is a headboard?
  • A vertical barrier across the front of the deck of a vehicle to prevent forward movement of cargo.
  • A transverse load bearing structural component, particularly a part of a log bunk.
  • A vertical barrier across a vehicle to prevent forward movement of cargo.
  • A vertical barrier placed directly behind the cab of a tractor to protect the cab in the event cargo should shift forward.
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Headboard:

A vertical barrier across the front of the deck of a vehicle to prevent forward movement of cargo.

Prev
Next
Load securement for cargo weighing 29,650 lbs must be able to withstand upward force of how many lbs?
  • 14,825 lbs
  • 5,930 lbs
  • 29,650 lbs
  • 30,000 lbs
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

How strong must the vehicle structure and anchor points be?

All elements of the vehicle structure and anchor points must be strong enough to withstand the forces described on page 7.

  • Forward force: 0.8 g (80%)
  • Rearward force: 0.5.g (50%)
  • Sideways force: 0.5 g (50%)
  • Upward force: 0.2 g (20%)

TruckingTruth's Advice:

29,650 x 20% = 5,930
Prev
Finish
Please select an option
[3,3,1,2,4,3,2,3,1,2]
10

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More