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Hazardous Materials Free CDL Practice Tests
Page 10

Prepare For The Hazardous Materials Portion Of Your CDL Written Exams

Hazardous Materials Questions

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One requirement of loading Class 8 materials would be:
  • Load breakable containers of corrosive liquid one-by-one if loading by hand
  • Stack them laying down
  • Roll them if they will roll
  • Keep the lighter packages on the bottom
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Class 8 (corrosive) materials –

If loading by hand, load breakable containers of corrosive liquid one by one. Keep them right-side up. Do not drop or roll the containers. Load them onto an even floor surface. Stack carboys only if the lower tiers can bear the weight of the upper tiers safely.

Next
Nitric acid of what concentration should never be above any other product?
  • Nitric acid should not be loaded above any other product at all
  • 30%
  • 80% or more
  • 25%
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From The CDL Manual

Do not load nitric acid with 50% or greater concentration above any other product or stack more than two high.

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Next
Corrosive liquids should never be loaded with:
  • Division 1.2 explosives
  • Any of these things
  • Poisonous gases
  • Blasting agents
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From The CDL Manual

Never load corrosive liquids with:

  • Division 1.1 or 1.2 (explosives A)
  • Division 1.2 or 1.3 (explosives B)
  • Division 1.5 (blasting agents)
  • Division 2.3, Zone A (poisonous gases)
  • Division 4.2 (spontaneously combustible materials)
  • Division 6.1, PG I, Zone A (poison liquids)
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Next
A radioactive package with a transport index of 6.9 must be kept a minimum of how many feet from people?
  • 3
  • 4
  • 0.6
  • 0.9
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From The CDL Manual

See "Radioactive Separation Table A" in Hazmat section of CDL manual

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If transporting undeveloped film on a 5-hour trip, a radioactive package with a transport index of 3.9 must be kept how far away, at minimum?
  • 1.8 feet
  • 6 meters
  • 5 feet
  • 6 feet
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

See "Radioactive Separation Table A" in Hazmat section of CDL manual

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Next
All of the following are true of portable tanks except:
  • They are loaded and unloaded while off the truck
  • They are bulk tanks
  • They are not permanently attached to the vehicle
  • They are bulk tanks permanently attached to the vehicle
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From The CDL Manual

The glossary at the end of this section gives the meaning of the word “bulk.” Cargo tanks are bulk packagings permanently attached to a vehicle. Cargo tanks remain on the vehicle when you load and unload them. Portable tanks are bulk containers not permanently attached to a vehicle.

The product is loaded or unloaded while the portable tanks are off the vehicle. Portable tanks are then put on a vehicle for transportation. There are many types of cargo tanks in use. The most common cargo tanks are MC406 for liquids and MC331 for gases.

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Portable tanks must display the shipping name on two opposite sites, and also display:
  • Specific packing instructions
  • The gross weight
  • The owner's or lessee name
  • The destination
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Portable tanks also must show the lessee or owner’s name and display the shipping name of the contents on two opposing sides. The letters of the shipping name must be at least 2-inches tall on portable tanks with capacities of more than 1,000 gallons and 1-inch tall on portable tanks with capacities of less than 1,000 gallons.

The ID number must appear on each side and each end of a portable tank or other bulk packaging that holds 1,000 gallons or more and on two opposing sides, if the portable tank holds less than 1,000 gallons. The ID numbers must still be visible when the portable tank is on the motor vehicle. If they are not visible, you must display the ID number on both sides and ends of the motor vehicle.

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Next
A portable tank with a capacity of more than 1,000 gallons requires the ID number to be marked in how many places?
  • 1
  • 3
  • 4
  • 2
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Portable tanks also must show the lessee or owner’s name and display the shipping name of the contents on two opposing sides. The letters of the shipping name must be at least 2-inches tall on portable tanks with capacities of more than 1,000 gallons and 1-inch tall on portable tanks with capacities of less than 1,000 gallons.

The ID number must appear on each side and each end of a portable tank or other bulk packaging that holds 1,000 gallons or more and on two opposing sides, if the portable tank holds less than 1,000 gallons. The ID numbers must still be visible when the portable tank is on the motor vehicle. If they are not visible, you must display the ID number on both sides and ends of the motor vehicle.

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Next
The letters of the shipping name on a portable container with a capacity of less than 1,000 gallons must be:
  • At least 2 inches tall
  • At least 1 inch high
  • Painted in red ink
  • At least 3 inches high
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Portable tanks also must show the lessee or owner’s name and display the shipping name of the contents on two opposing sides. The letters of the shipping name must be at least 2-inches tall on portable tanks with capacities of more than 1,000 gallons and 1-inch tall on portable tanks with capacities of less than 1,000 gallons.

The ID number must appear on each side and each end of a portable tank or other bulk packaging that holds 1,000 gallons or more and on two opposing sides, if the portable tank holds less than 1,000 gallons. The ID numbers must still be visible when the portable tank is on the motor vehicle. If they are not visible, you must display the ID number on both sides and ends of the motor vehicle.

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Next
Loading a tank requires a minimum of how many people?
  • 4
  • 2
  • 3
  • 1
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Tank Loading —

The person in charge of loading and unloading a cargo tank must be sure a qualified person is always watching. The person watching the loading or unloading must:

  • Be alert.
  • Have a clear view of the cargo tank and delivery hose.
  • Be within 25 feet of the tank.
  • Know of the hazards of the materials involved.
  • Know the procedures to follow in an emergency.
  • Be authorized to move the cargo tank and able to do so.
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