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Hazardous Materials Free CDL Practice Tests
Page 13

Prepare For The Hazardous Materials Portion Of Your CDL Written Exams

Hazardous Materials Questions

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All of the following are true of shipping papers except:
  • When you are behind the wheel, keep shipping papers within your reach
  • The driver should put them in his/her pocket when leaving the vehicle
  • Clearly distinguish hazardous material shipping papers from others by tabbing them or keeping them on top of the stack of papers
  • Leave shipping papers in the driver’s door pouch or on the driver’s seat when not in the vehicle
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From The CDL Manual

Displaying Shipping Papers and Emergency Response Information —

Do not accept a hazardous materials shipment without a properly prepared shipping paper. A shipping paper for hazardous material must always be easily recognized. Other people must be able to find it quickly after an accident.

  • Clearly distinguish hazardous material shipping papers from others by tabbing them or keeping them on top of the stack of papers.
  • When you are behind the wheel, keep shipping papers within your reach (with your seat belt on) or in a pouch on the driver’s door. They must be easily seen by someone entering the cab.
  • When not behind the wheel, leave shipping papers in the driver’s door pouch or on the driver’s seat.
  • Emergency response information must be kept in the same location as the shipping paper.
Next
A carrier must give to the driver transporting Division 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 (Class A or B) explosives:
  • The carrier is responsible for providing all of these things to the driver
  • Written instructions in the event of an accident or delay
  • A copy of Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR), Part 397
  • The nature of the explosives being transported
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Papers for Division 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3 Explosives —

A carrier must give each driver transporting Division 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3 (Class A or B) explosives a copy of Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR), Part 397. The carrier also must give written instructions on what to do if delayed or in an accident. The written instructions must include:

  • Names and telephone numbers of people to contact (including carrier agents or shippers).
  • Nature of the explosives transported.
  • Precautions to take in emergencies such as fires, accidents, or leaks.
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When transporting Division 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3 Explosives, driver must have and be familiar with all of these except:
  • Copy of FMCSR, Part 397
  • You must have all of these things
  • Shipping papers
  • Written route plan and emergency instructions
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

You must be familiar with and have in your possession while driving:

  • Shipping papers.
  • Written emergency instructions.
  • Written route plan.
  • Copy of FMCSR, Part 397.
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Next
When transporting chlorine, a driver must have an emergency leak control kit and also:
  • A gas mask
  • Rubber boots
  • A safety net
  • A hazmat suit
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From The CDL Manual

Equipment for Chlorine —

A driver transporting chlorine in cargo tanks must have an approved gas mask in the vehicle. The driver also must have an emergency kit for controlling leaks in dome cover plate fittings on the cargo tank.

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A placarded vehicle, or one that has cargo tanks used for hazmat, must do what at a railroad crossing?
  • Cross as quickly as possible without stopping
  • Turn around and avoid them entirely
  • Come to a complete stop before crossing
  • Get a police escort to cross
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Stop Before Railroad Crossings —

Stop before a railroad crossing if your vehicle:

  • Is placarded; or
  • Carries any amount of chlorine; or
  • Has cargo tanks, whether loaded or empty, used for hazardous materials.

You must stop 15 to 50 feet before the nearest rail. Proceed only when you are sure no train is coming. Do not shift gears while crossing the tracks.

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Next
It is crucial that the shipping papers, labels, and placards are correct because:
  • In an emergency, response personnel use that information to respond correctly
  • The driver should just be able to concentrate on driving
  • Accuracy is a desirable goal
  • The shipper doesn't have time to redo everything
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Emergency Response Guidebook —

The Department of Transportation has an Emergency Response Guidebook for firefighters, police and industry workers on how to protect themselves and the public from hazardous materials.

The guide is indexed by proper shipping name and hazardous materials identification number. Emergency personnel can obtain these things from the shipping paper. That is why it is vital that the proper ID number, shipping name, label and placards are correct.

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In the event of a hazmat incident or accident, the driver should do all of the following except:
  • Try to keep people away from the scene
  • Make sure to give emergency responders the shipping papers and emergency response information
  • If safe to do so, limit the spread of the material
  • Leave his or her truck and get as far away as possible
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Accidents/Incidents —

As a professional driver, your job at the scene of an accident is to:

  • Keep people away from the scene.
  • Limit the spread of material, only if you can safely do so.
  • Communicate the danger of the hazardous materials to emergency response personnel.
  • Provide emergency responders with the shipping papers and emergency response information.
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Next
In an emergency, the first thing you should do after checking on your partner is:
  • Make sure you keep shipping papers with you
  • Send for help
  • Warn others of the danger
  • Call your employer for instructions
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Accidents/Incidents —

As a professional driver, your job at the scene of an accident is to:

  • Keep people away from the scene.
  • Limit the spread of material, only if you can safely do so.
  • Communicate the danger of the hazardous materials to emergency response personnel.
  • Provide emergency responders with the shipping papers and emergency response information.

Follow this checklist:

  • Check to see that your driving partner is OK.
  • Keep shipping papers with you.
  • Keep people far away and upwind.
  • Warn others of the danger.
  • Send for help.
  • Follow your employer’s instructions.
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Next
In case of a fire, if the trailer doors are hot:
  • Open them a small amount to let air in
  • Make sure that they are unlocked
  • Do not open them
  • Open them as wide as possible
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From The CDL Manual

When you discover a fire, send someone for help. You may use the fire extinguisher to keep minor truck fires from spreading to cargo before firefighters arrive. Feel trailer doors to see if they are hot before opening them. If hot, you may have a cargo fire and should not open the doors.

Opening doors lets air in and may make the fire flare up. Without air, many fires only smolder until firemen arrive, doing less damage. If your cargo is already on fire, it is not safe to fight the fire. Keep the shipping papers with you to give to emergency personnel as soon as they arrive. Warn other people of the danger and keep them away.

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In order to properly fight a hazmat fire, the driver must:
  • You should never fight hazmat fires
  • Call emergency personnel first
  • Use two fire extinguishers
  • Put out the cargo fire first
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Fires —

You might have to control minor truck fires on the road. However, unless you have the training and equipment to do so safely, do not fight hazardous material fires. Dealing with hazardous material fires requires special training and protective gear.

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