CDL Practice Tests For Logbook Rules Page 3

Logbook Rules Practice Questions

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If you have used up all of your 14 hour on duty time, how many hours would you regain after an 8 hour break in the sleeper berth?
  • You would regain half of your hours (7 hours total)
  • None of these answers are correct
  • Your 14 hour limit would reset
  • You will still have no hours remaining
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Eight hours of sleeper berth time:

You may also use the sleeper berth to extend the 14 hour limit. Any period in the sleeper berth of at least 8 consecutive hours will not count as part of the 14 hours, and, therefore, would allow you to extend the time during which you could use your maximum 11 hours of driving.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

An 8 hour break will never add more hours to any of your limits. Rather, an 8 hour break simply extends your time by not counting the break against your 14 hour duty clock. The concept is confusing, but it's actually very simple. Here are some examples.

  • If you have 5 hours remaining on your 14 hour duty clock then go into the sleeper berth for 8 hours, at the end of your break you will still have 5 hours remaining.
  • If you have 1 hour remaining on your 14 hour duty clock then go into the sleeper berth for 8 hours, at the end of your break you will still have 1 hour remaining.
  • If you have 0 hours remaining on your 14 hour duty clock then go into the sleeper berth for 8 hours, at the end of your break you will still have 0 hours remaining.
  • As you can see, you will not gain any hours back after taking an 8 hour break. Instead, your available hours have simply been extended.

    So why would you ever want to take an 8 hour break instead of a 10 hour break? Here's an example:

    Let's say you have a delivery in the morning, but you are not allowed to park at your delivery location overnight. Instead, you have to stop at a truck stop 20 miles away to park for the night. In order to make your appointment on time, you must leave after only resting for 8 hours. If that's the case, you can still make the delivery on time by taking an 8 hour break instead of a full 10 hour break.

    Little situations like this will come up frequently as a truck driver. That's why it's so important to understand these little loopholes and tricks. We'll go through more examples later on in this section, but try to have a full understanding of the 10, 8 and split sleeper rules.

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Who must complete a log?
  • Only drivers who drive a passenger carrying vehicle
  • Any person who is subject to the safety regulations and drives a commercial motor vehicle
  • Only drivers who cross state lines
  • Logs are completely voluntary for commercial drivers
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Any person who is subject to the safety regulations and drives a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) must complete a logbook page for any day that includes CMV driving and for the prior 7 days (unless under an exception on some of those days).

TruckingTruth's Advice:

If you are planning on becoming an OTR truck driver, you will not qualify for any logbook exceptions and will be expected to maintain an updated and current logbook at all times.
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What hours must your logbook show?
  • The logbook only needs to show a 12 consecutive hour time frame each day
  • All 24 hours of every day
  • Only your resting hours
  • Only the hours you are on duty or driving
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

You must account for every day on your log, even days off, unless you are covered by a logbook exception on any of the days. The log must cover all 24 hours of every day.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

All logbooks must show 24 hours for each day and each hour must be accounted for. Even if you were off duty for an entire 24 hour stretch, you must log the entire day as off duty.
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When you change your duty status, you must document all of the following except:
  • The state you are in
  • All of these must be documented
  • The city or town you are in
  • The county you are in
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Remarks: This is the area where you must list the city, town, or village, and state abbreviation when a change of duty status occurs. You should also explain any unusual circum­stances or log entries that may be unclear when reviewed later, such as encountering adverse driving conditions.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Law enforcement officers will check all of your paperwork, including receipts or toll records, to make sure your logs are showing the correct locations at the correct times.

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Your log must include all of the following except:
  • Your home address
  • Your signature
  • Total driving miles
  • Truck or tractor and trailer number
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

The regulations do not say what the log form must look like. However, it must include a 24-hour graph grid, which is shown in the regulations, and the following information on each page:

  • Total driving miles: You must write down the total number of miles you drove during the 24-hour period.
  • Main office address: You must write down your carrier’s main office address.
  • Truck or tractor and trailer number: You must write down either the vehicle number(s) assigned by your company, or the license number and licensing state for each truck (and trailer, if any) you drove during the 24-hour period.
  • Your signature: You must certify that all of your entries are true and correct by signing your log with your legal name or name of record.
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How current must your logbook be?
  • You must show what time you went on duty, then the rest of the log can be filled out when you go off duty for the day
  • Logs must be filled out at the end of each driving day
  • Your current day log must be filled out within' 48 hours
  • It must show your last duty change
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

The current days log must be current to your last change of duty status.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Quite a few truck drivers are written citations or are placed out of service because their logbooks aren't current. These citations are the result of laziness. You must be current to your last duty status change. So if you are randomly stopped by a police officer and your logbook is checked, it should when you last changed into the driving status.

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How many days are you required to keep your completed logs?
  • 12 days
  • 8 days
  • 10 days
  • 14 days
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Authorized government inspectors may check your logs at any time. You will be required to keep a log for each of the previous 8 days. The current days log must be current to your last change of duty status. Inspectors check your logs to see if you have violated the hours of service regulations. Violations of the HOS regulations can result in being fined and/or placed out of service.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

You must have a total of 8 logs at all times:

  • Your current day's log.
  • Logs for each of the previous 7 days.

Law enforcement officers and DOT inspectors will usually issue a citation if you do not have all of those logs to show them.

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Why Do HOS Regulations Exist?
  • All of these answers are true
  • To reduce accidents caused by driver fatigue
  • To keep drivers from sitting too long between load assignments
  • To ensure drivers are being paid at least minimum wage
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Why Do HOS Regulations Exist?

The purpose of HOS regulations is to reduce accidents caused by driver fatigue. Many drivers don't like being told when they can and can't drive, but as you can see in Figure 13-1 below, the risk of an accident is directly related to how many hours a driver has been behind the wheel. HOS regulations were designed so that drivers wouldn't push themselves too far and also so that carriers can't force drivers to drive beyond their limits.

Figure 13-1

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HOS regulations were designed to do all of the following except:
  • To require drivers to keep an updated log showing all of their working and resting hours
  • To regulate the maximum amount of time drivers can spend resting between driving shifts
  • To ensure drivers wouldn't push themselves too far
  • So that carriers can't force drivers to drive beyond their limits
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

What Are Hours Of Service Regulations?

HOS regulations are rules issued by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) which is a division within the Department of Transportation (DOT). The regulations limit the number of daily and weekly hours which can be spent driving and working. They also regulate the minimum amount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. Drivers are required to keep an updated log showing all of their working and resting hours.

Why Do HOS Regulations Exist?

The purpose of HOS regulations is to reduce accidents caused by driver fatigue. Many drivers don't like being told when they can and can't drive, but as you can see in Figure 13-1 below, the risk of an accident is directly related to how many hours a driver has been behind the wheel. HOS regulations were designed so that drivers wouldn't push themselves too far and also so that carriers can't force drivers to drive beyond their limits.

Figure 13-1

TruckingTruth's Advice:

The required resting periods are minimum requirements, not maximum requirements. The same can be said about working hours. Bottom line, if you're too tired to drive, don't drive!

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Which statement below is false?
  • Your logbook can be checked by your carrier at anytime
  • Non-DOT law enforcement officers need probable cause to inspect your logbook
  • Your logbook can be randomly checked anytime you go through a weigh station
  • The increased use of electronic logging devices has forced carriers to crack down on HOS violations
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Who Enforces HOS Regulations?

Law enforcement:

Generally, DOT officers are the ones who enforce HOS rules, although any police officer may inspect a driver's logbook. Individual states are responsible for maintaining weigh stations where drivers are pulled in for random vehicle and logbook inspections. Drivers may also be pulled over for random checks by police officers or DOT officials at any time and have their logbooks inspected. While it's not a frequent occurrence, chances are your logbook will be checked every now and then. Be ready for it at all times!

Carriers:

In addition to law enforcement and DOT officials, most carriers have their own company policies regarding logbooks. A drivers logs are frequently reviewed by internal auditors for discrepancies or violations. A driver with too many violations might be warned, disciplined, or terminated (terminating a driver usually only occurs after several violations). The increased use of electronic logging devices (discussed later) has forced carriers to crack down on HOS violations even more.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Your logbook could be checked at anytime for any reason. Make sure it is always updated!

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