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School Bus Free CDL Practice Tests
Page 6

Prepare For The School Bus Portion Of Your CDL Written Exams

School Bus Questions

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When stopped at a railroad crossing, you should always:
  • Turn of all noisy equipment and radios
  • You should do all of these things
  • Open the service door and driver's window
  • Silence the passengers
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From The CDL Manual

At the Crossing:

  • Stop no closer than 15 feet and no farther than 50 feet from the nearest rail, where you have the best view of the tracks.
  • Place the transmission in Park or if there is no Park shift point, place in Neutral and press down on the service brake or set the parking brakes.
  • Turn off all radios and noisy equipment and silence the passengers.
  • Open the service door and driver’s window. Look and listen for an approaching train.
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When crossing the railroad tracks, if the gate comes down after you have started across:
  • Stop immediately
  • Drive right through it, even if you have to break it
  • Keep driving, but try to avoid damaging the gates
  • Back up off of the tracks
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Crossing the Track:

  • Check the crossing signals again before proceeding.
  • At a multiple-track crossing, stop only before the first set of tracks. When you are sure no train is approaching on any track, proceed across all of the tracks until you have completely cleared them.
  • Cross the tracks in a low gear. Do not change gears while crossing.
  • If the gate comes down after you have started across, drive through it even if it means you will break the gate.
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When going over multiple-track crossings, you should:
  • Only stop at the first one, and cross all tracks without stopping
  • Stop before every track
  • Get out and look down every track both ways, then cross immediately
  • Drive across all of them as fast as possible
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Crossing the Track:

  • Check the crossing signals again before proceeding.
  • At a multiple-track crossing, stop only before the first set of tracks. When you are sure no train is approaching on any track, proceed across all of the tracks until you have completely cleared them.
  • Cross the tracks in a low gear. Do not change gears while crossing.
  • If the gate comes down after you have started across, drive through it even if it means you will break the gate.
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When crossing railroad tracks, do not:
  • Cross in low gear
  • Change gears
  • Cross multiple tracks
  • Double-check the crossing signals
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Crossing the Track:

  • Check the crossing signals again before proceeding.
  • At a multiple-track crossing, stop only before the first set of tracks. When you are sure no train is approaching on any track, proceed across all of the tracks until you have completely cleared them.
  • Cross the tracks in a low gear. Do not change gears while crossing.
  • If the gate comes down after you have started across, drive through it even if it means you will break the gate.
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If the bus gets stuck or stalls while crossing the tracks:
  • Call your dispatcher for instructions
  • Get out to see if a train is coming, then call dispatch
  • Evacuate the bus and get away from the tracks immediately
  • Wait for emergency personnel to arrive
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Bus Stalls or Trapped on Tracks:

If your bus stalls or is trapped on the tracks, get everyone out and off the tracks immediately. Move everyone far from the bus at an angle, which is both away from the tracks and toward the train.

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When faced with a railroad crossing that has a signal or stop sign on the opposite side:
  • Add 15 feet to the length of the bus to determine if you have room to cross
  • Honk the horn repeatedly to let the cars in front of you know you're coming through
  • Find another way around the tracks
  • Block the tracks with the bus until you can safely cross
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Containment or Storage Areas:

If it won’t fit, do not commit! Know the length of your bus and the size of the containment area at highway-rail crossings on the school bus route, as well as any crossing you encounter in the course of a school activity trip. When approaching a crossing with a signal or stop sign on the opposite side, pay attention to the amount of room there.

Be certain the bus has enough containment or storage area to completely clear the railroad tracks on the other side if there is a need to stop. As a general rule, add 15 feet to the length of the school bus to determine an acceptable amount of containment or storage area.

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Whether the railroad crossing is passive or active, when driving a school bus you must always:
  • Cross very quickly
  • Get out and look
  • Look and listen
  • Sound your horn
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From The CDL Manual

Obstructed View of Tracks:

Plan your route so it provides maximum sight distance at highway-rail grade crossings. Do not attempt to cross the tracks unless you can see far enough down the track to know for certain that no trains are approaching. Passive crossings are those that do not have any type of traffic control device. Be especially careful at “passive” crossings. Even if there are active railroad signals that indicate the tracks are clear, you must look and listen to be sure it is safe to proceed.

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When handling serious student problems, always do the following except:
  • Proper student management includes all of these things
  • Stop the bus in a safe location
  • Secure the bus, and take the key with you, if you leave your seat
  • Call the school or police if a student needs to be removed
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

10.5.2 – Handling Serious Problems

Tips on handling serious problems:

  • Follow your school’s procedures for discipline or refusal of rights to ride the bus.
  • Stop the bus. Park in a safe location off the road, perhaps a parking lot or a driveway.
  • Secure the bus. Take the ignition key with you if you leave your seat.
  • Stand up and speak respectfully to the offender or offenders. Speak in a courteous manner with a firm voice. Remind the offender of the expected behavior. Do not show anger but do show that you mean business.
  • If a change of seating is needed, request that the student move to a seat near you.
  • Never put a student off the bus except at school or at his or her designated school bus stop. If you feel that the offense is serious enough that you cannot safely drive the bus, call for a school administrator or the police to come and remove the student. Always follow your state or local procedures for requesting assistance.
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All of the following are good tips on handling serious student issues except:
  • Problem students should be removed as soon as possible, regardless of whether or not it is their stop
  • Show the offender that you mean business, but in a calm, firm, courteous way
  • Stop and park the bus in a safe location
  • Only remove a problem student at their stop, or call school administration or police to remove them
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

10.5.2 – Handling Serious Problems

Tips on handling serious problems:

  • Follow your school’s procedures for discipline or refusal of rights to ride the bus.
  • Stop the bus. Park in a safe location off the road, perhaps a parking lot or a driveway.
  • Secure the bus. Take the ignition key with you if you leave your seat.
  • Stand up and speak respectfully to the offender or offenders. Speak in a courteous manner with a firm voice. Remind the offender of the expected behavior. Do not show anger but do show that you mean business.
  • If a change of seating is needed, request that the student move to a seat near you.
  • Never put a student off the bus except at school or at his or her designated school bus stop. If you feel that the offense is serious enough that you cannot safely drive the bus, call for a school administrator or the police to come and remove the student. Always follow your state or local procedures for requesting assistance.
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What does ABS stand for?
  • Antilock Braking System
  • Antilock Braking Shoes
  • Aerodynamic Braking System
  • Antilock Bus System
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

10.6.1 – Vehicles Required to Have Antilock Braking Systems

The Department of Transportation requires that antilock braking systems be on:

Air brakes vehicles (trucks, buses, trailers and converter dollies) built on or after March 1, 1999. Hydraulically braked trucks and buses with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 lbs or more built on or after March 1, 1999.

Many buses built before these dates have been voluntarily equipped with ABS. Your school bus will have a yellow ABS malfunction lamp on the instrument panel if it is equipped with ABS.

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