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Tankers Free CDL Practice Tests
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Prepare For The Tankers Portion Of Your CDL Written Exams

Tankers Questions

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The dividers that split some liquid tanks into several smaller tanks are called:
  • Splitters
  • Bulkheads
  • Dividers
  • Baffles
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From The CDL Manual

Bulkheads:

Some liquid tanks are divided into several smaller tanks by bulkheads. When loading and unloading the smaller tanks, the driver must pay attention to weight distribution. Do not put too much weight on the front or rear of the vehicle.

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Bulkheads with holes in them designed control liquid surge are:
  • Scrabbles
  • Perforations
  • Biffles
  • Baffles
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From The CDL Manual

Baffled tanks:

Baffled liquid tanks have bulkheads in them with holes that let the liquid flow through. The baffles help to control the forward and backward liquid surge. Side-to-side surge can still occur. This can cause a roll over.

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Baffled tanks are prohibited for transporting:
  • Gasoline
  • Food products
  • Heating oil
  • Sand
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From The CDL Manual

Unbaffled tanks:

Unbaffled liquid tankers (sometimes called “smooth bore” tanks) have nothing inside to slow down the flow of the liquid. Therefore, forward-and-back surge is very strong. Unbaffled tanks are usually those that transport food products (e.g., milk). (Sanitation regulations forbid the use of baffles because of the difficulty in cleaning the inside of the tank.)

Be extremely cautious (slow and careful) in driving smooth bore tanks, especially when starting and stopping.

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When should you load a liquid tank vehicle completely full?
  • Only when it's below 65 degrees outside
  • You should never fully load a cargo tank
  • Only on trips of less than 500 miles
  • When carrying food products
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From The CDL Manual

How Much to Load —

Never load a cargo tank totally full. Liquids expand as they warm and you must leave room for the expanding liquid. This is called “outage.” Since different liquids expand by different amounts, they require different amounts of outage. You must know the outage requirement when hauling liquids in bulk.

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The empty space in tanks that must be left to account for expansion is called:
  • Clearance
  • Storage space
  • Outage
  • Headroom
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From The CDL Manual

How Much to Load —

Never load a cargo tank totally full. Liquids expand as they warm and you must leave room for the expanding liquid. This is called “outage.” Since different liquids expand by different amounts, they require different amounts of outage. You must know the outage requirement when hauling liquids in bulk.

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The amount of liquid depends on all of the following except:
  • The legal weight limits
  • How much the liquid will expand
  • The viscosity of the liquid
  • The liquid's weight
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From The CDL Manual

A full tank of dense liquid (such as some acids) may exceed legal weight limits. For that reason, you often may only partially fill tanks with heavy liquids. The amount of liquid to load into a tank depends on:

  • The amount the liquid will expand in transit.
  • The weight of the liquid.
  • Legal weight limits.
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Un-baffled tanks are also known as:
  • Smooth tank
  • Smooth bore
  • Clean bore
  • Hollow bore
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From The CDL Manual

8.2.5 – Un-baffled Tanks

Unbaffled liquid tankers (sometimes called "smooth bore" tanks) have nothing inside to slow down the flow of the liquid. Therefore, forward-and-back surge is very strong. Unbaffled tanks are usually those that transport food products (e.g., milk). (Sanitation regulations forbid the use of baffles because of the difficulty in cleaning the inside of the tank.) Be extremely cautious (slow and careful) in driving smooth bore tanks, especially when starting and stopping.

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Next
Driving a tank vehicle on wet roads requires:
  • Special permits
  • Double the normal stopping distance
  • A wet pavement endorsement
  • Re-routing around towns
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

8.3.4 – Stopping Distance

Keep in mind how much space you need to stop your vehicle. Remember that wet roads double the normal stopping distance. Empty tank vehicles may take longer to stop than full ones.

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How many baffles are found in a smooth bore tank?
  • 4
  • 5 or more
  • 2
  • 0
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Unbaffled liquid tankers (sometimes called "smooth bore" tanks) have nothing inside to slow down the flow of the liquid. Therefore, forward-and-back surge is very strong.

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Next
The amount of liquid to load into a tank does not depend upon:
  • The pumping capacity of the rear pump
  • The weight of the liquid
  • The amount the liquid will expand in transit
  • Legal weight limits
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

A full tank of dense liquid (such as some acids) may exceed legal weight limits. For that reason, you may often only partially fill tanks with heavy liquids. The amount of liquid to load into a tank depends on:

  • The amount the liquid will expand in transit.
  • The weight of the liquid.
  • Legal weight limits
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