CDL Practice Tests For Weight Distribution Page 5

Weight Distribution Practice Questions

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If you load cargo into the overhang portion of the trailer, what will be the result?
  • You will put less weight on the trailer tandems than the cargo itself weighs, and you will actually add a little bit of weight to the drive axles at the same time.
  • You will put more weight on the trailer tandems than the cargo itself weighs, and you will actually take a little bit of weight off the drive axles at the same time.
  • The center of gravity will be moved toward the front of the trailer and you will have to slide the trailer tandems all the way to the rear of the 53 foot trailer
  • You will evenly distribute the load across the drive axles and trailer tandems, but the steer axle could now be overweight
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From The CDL Manual

Because the trailer pivots up and down at the kingpin above the drive axles, the floor of the trailer acts as a lever pushing down against the trailer tandems when freight is loaded into the overhang portion of the trailer. The further back you load the freight into the overhang portion of the trailer, the more leverage it creates. The net effect of this leverage is that you're putting more weight on the trailer tandems than the cargo itself weighs, and you will actually take a little bit of weight off the drive axles at the same time.
Next
What is the safe number to use in calculations for the weight of fuel?
  • 10 pounds per gallon
  • 6 pounds per gallon
  • 8 pounds per gallon
  • 7.25 pounds per gallon
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From The CDL Manual

The precise weight of diesel fuel will vary based on temperature and humidity, but is generally around 7.25-7.5 pounds per gallon. So the safest bet is to use 8 pounds per gallon as the number you'll plug into your calculations, and that's what we're going to use here.
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What is the best way to determine what percentage of the weight of fuel will go to each set of axles?
  • The percentage is standardized amongst manufacturers and is the same for every truck
  • Ask another driver what their numbers are
  • Simply go by the number of gallons of fuel each tank holds
  • Weigh the truck immediately before and after fueling, and do a simple calculation
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From The CDL Manual

The best way to determine what percentage of your fuel will go to each set of axles is to weigh the truck immediately before and after fueling, and do a simple calculation
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Where will the weight of fuel be distributed?
  • Mostly to your drive axles, with some going onto the steer axle.
  • Mostly to your steer axle, with some going onto the drive axles.
  • Entirely on your steer axle
  • Entirely on your drive axles
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From The CDL Manual

The weight of the fuel in your tanks will be distributed mostly to your steer axle, with some going onto the drive axles.
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What is the correct method of determining what percentage of fuel is distributed between the steer axle and the drive axles?
  • Weigh the truck, then drive exactly 100 miles, and then re-weigh the truck to see what percentage of the added weight went to the steer axle, and what percentage went to the drive axles.
  • Weigh the truck immediately after fueling, then run exactly 100 miles, and then re-weigh the truck to see what percentage of the added weight came off the steer axles.
  • Weigh the truck after running 100 miles, then immediately fuel up, and then re-weigh the truck to see what percentage of the added weight went to the steer axle, and what percentage went to the drive axles.
  • Weigh the truck, then immediately fuel up, and then immediately re-weigh the truck to see what percentage of the added weight went to the steer axle, and what percentage went to the drive axles.
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

In order to accurately determine what percentage of fuel weight goes to your steer axle versus your drive axles you can simply weight the truck, then immediately fuel up, and then immediately re-weigh the truck to see what percentage of the added weight went to the steer axle, and what percentage went to the drive axles.
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Next
You weigh the truck immediately before and after fueling. Based on the following, determine what percentage of the weight goes to each set of axles:

Before fueling:
steer: 11,450, drives: 33,100, gross: 76,700
After fueling:
steer:11,850, drives: 33,300, gross: 77,300
  • 88% went on the steer axle
    12% went on the drive axles
  • 75% went on the steer axle
    25% went on the drive axles
  • 73% went on the steer axle
    27% went on the drive axles
  • 67% went on the steer axle
    33% went on the drive axles
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

To determine the percentage of fuel weight added to the steer axle, take the weight added to the steer axle, divide it by the total fuel weight added (determined by the change in the gross weight), and then multiply that times 100

TruckingTruth's Advice:

To determine the percentage of fuel weight added to the steer axle, take the weight added to the steer axle (400 pounds), divide it by the total fuel weight added (600 pounds), and then multiply that times 100

400/600 = .67

.67 * 100 = 67% fuel weight to the steer tires

100% - 67% = 33% went on the drive axles.
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Next
You weigh the truck immediately before and after fueling. Based on the following, determine what percentage of the weight goes to each set of axles:

Before fueling:
steer: 11,100, drives: 32,600, gross: 71,400
After fueling:
steer:11,850, drives: 32,850, gross: 72,400
  • 80% went on the steer axle
    20% went on the drive axle
  • 67% went on the steer axle
    33% went on the drive axles
  • 75% went on the steer axle
    25% went on the drive axles
  • 65% went on the steer axle
    35% went on the drive axles
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

To determine the percentage of fuel weight added to the steer axle, take the weight added to the steer axle, divide it by the total fuel weight added (determined by the change in the gross weight), and then multiply that times 100

TruckingTruth's Advice:

To determine the percentage of fuel weight added to the steer axle, take the weight added to the steer axle (750 pounds), divide it by the total fuel weight added (1000 pounds), and then multiply that times 100

750/1000 = .75

.75 * 100 = 75% fuel weight to the steer tires

100% - 75% = 25% went on the drive axles.
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Next
You weigh the truck immediately before and after fueling. Based on the following, determine what percentage of the weight goes to each set of axles:

Before fueling:
steer: 10,200, drives: 31,300, gross: 71,700
After fueling:
steer:11,000, drives: 31,500, gross: 72,700
  • 80% went on the steer axle
    20% went on the drive axles
  • 75% went on the steer axle
    25% went on the drive axles
  • 67% went on the steer axle
    33% went on the drive axles
  • 70% went on the steer axle
    30% went on the drive axles
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

To determine the percentage of fuel weight added to the steer axle, take the weight added to the steer axle, divide it by the total fuel weight added (determined by the change in the gross weight), and then multiply that times 100

TruckingTruth's Advice:

To determine the percentage of fuel weight added to the steer axle, take the weight added to the steer axle (800 pounds), divide it by the total fuel weight added (1000 pounds), and then multiply that times 100

800/1000 = .8

.8 * 100 = 80% fuel weight to the steer tires

100% - 80% = 20% went on the drive axles.
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Next
Based on the following figures, how much fuel can you legally add while remaining legal on the steer axle?

Load rating of steer tires: 6,150 pounds
Percentage of fuel weight to steer axle: 80%
Steer axle weight limit in states you're travelling: 20,000 pounds
Weight Before Fueling: Steer: 11,450, drives: 33,100, gross: 76,700
  • 121.25 gallons
  • 146 gallons
  • 119.5 gallons
  • 132.81 gallons
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From The CDL Manual

Once you know your current axle weights and the percentage of fuel weight that goes on the steer axle, you can use this formula you can calculate the amount of fuel you can take on:

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Because your steer tires are rated at 6,150 and the legal weight limit is 20,000 pounds for the steer axle in the states you're travelling in, the most restrictive law would be to not exceed the tire load rating. In this case, you can have 12,300 on your steer axle. Right now you have 11,450 on your steer axle, which means you can add 850 pounds to your steer axle and still be legal.

Because we know that 80% of the weight of fuel will go to the steer axle and you can add 850 pounds to your steer axle, we can plug the numbers into the formula above.

850/80 = 10.62
10.62 x 100 = 1062
1062/8 = 132.75 gallons of fuel you can add
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Based on the following figures, how much fuel can you legally add while remaining legal on the steer axle?

Load rating of steer tires: 6,150 pounds
Percentage of fuel weight to steer axle: 85%
Steer axle weight limit in states you're travelling: 20,000 pounds
Weight Before Fueling: Steer: 11,500, drives: 33,100, gross: 76,700
  • 133 gallons of fuel
  • 129.5 gallons of fuel
  • 110.75 gallons of fuel
  • 117.64 gallons of fuel
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Once you know your current axle weights and the percentage of fuel weight that goes on the steer axle, you can use this formula you can calculate the amount of fuel you can take on:

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Because your steer tires are rated at 6,150 and the legal weight limit is 20,000 pounds for the steer axle in the states you're travelling in, the most restrictive law would be to not exceed the tire load rating. In this case, you can have 12,300 on your steer axle. Right now you have 11,500 on your steer axle, which means you can add 800 pounds to your steer axle and still be legal.

Because we know that 85% of the weight of fuel will go to the steer axle and you can add 850 pounds to your steer axle, we can plug the numbers into the formula above.

800/85 = 9.41
9.41 x 100 = 941
941/8 = 117.63 gallons of fuel you can add
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