CDL Practice Tests For Weight Distribution Page 6

Weight Distribution Practice Questions

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Based on the following figures, how much fuel can you legally add while remaining legal on the drive axles?

Percentage of fuel weight to drive axles: 25%
Weight Before Fueling: Steer: 11,275, drives: 33,800, gross: 77,420
  • 119.75 gallons of fuel
  • 100 gallons of fuel
  • 122 gallons of fuel
  • 108.8 gallons of fuel
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Once you know your current axle weights and the percentage of fuel weight that goes on the drive axles, you can use this formula to calculate the amount of fuel you can take on:

TruckingTruth's Advice:

We know that 25% of the weight of fuel will go to the drive axles and you have 200 pounds you can add to the weight of the drive axles and remain legal. So plugging these numbers into the formula, you get:

200/25 = 8
8x100 = 800
800/8 = 100 gallons of fuel you can add
Next
Based on the following figures, how much fuel can you legally add while remaining legal on the drive axles?

Percentage of fuel weight to drive axles: 30%
Weight Before Fueling: Steer: 11,275, drives: 33,750, gross: 77,220
  • 112.75 gallons of fuel
  • 110 gallons of fuel
  • 104.13 gallons of fuel
  • 88.5 gallons of fuel
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Once you know your current axle weights and the percentage of fuel weight that goes on the drive axles, you can use this formula to calculate the amount of fuel you can take on:

TruckingTruth's Advice:

We know that 30% of the weight of fuel will go to the drive axles and you have 250 pounds you can add to the weight of the drive axles and remain legal. So plugging these numbers into the formula, you get:

250/30 = 8.33
8.33x100 = 833
833/8 = 104.13 gallons of fuel you can add
Prev
Next
Using 7 miles per gallon as your fuel mileage and 8 pounds per gallon for the weight of fuel, how much total fuel weight will you burn off in 210 miles?
  • 240 pounds
  • 270 pounds
  • 180 pounds
  • 210 pounds
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

To figure out how many gallons of fuel you'll burn off, simply divide the number of miles travelled by the miles per gallon

Number of miles travelled / miles per gallon = gallons of fuel burned off

TruckingTruth's Advice:

210 miles travelled / 7 miles per gallon = 30 gallons of fuel burned off

30 gallons x 8 pounds per gallon = 240 pounds of fuel burned off
Prev
Next
Using 6 miles per gallon as your fuel mileage and 8 pounds per gallon for the weight of fuel, how much total fuel weight will you burn off in 600 miles?
  • 600 pounds of fuel
  • 480 pounds of fuel
  • 850 pounds of fuel
  • 800 pounds of fuel
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

To figure out how many gallons of fuel you'll burn off, simply divide the number of miles travelled by the miles per gallon

Number of miles travelled / miles per gallon = gallons of fuel burned off

TruckingTruth's Advice:

600 miles travelled / 6 miles per gallon = 100 gallons of fuel burned off

100 gallons x 8 pounds per gallon = 800 pounds of fuel burned off
Prev
Next
Using the following numbers for your calculations, how much weight will come off your steer axle?

Miles per gallon: 7
Miles travelled: 280
Percenatage of fuel weight on steer axle: 80%
  • 256 pounds
  • 300 pounds
  • 310 pounds
  • 280 pounds
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

To calculate the percentage of a value, you simply multiply the total value times the percentage you're looking for, and then divide by 100.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

If you're getting 7 miles per gallon and you travel 280 miles:

280/7 = 40 gallons of fuel

40 gallons x 8 pounds per gallon = 320 pounds of total fuel burned off

Since 80% of the weight of fuel goes on our steer axle, we need to know what 80% of 320 is:

80 x 320 / 100 = 256 pounds coming off the steer axle
Prev
Next
Using the following numbers for your calculations, how much weight will come off your drive axles?

Miles per gallon: 6
Miles travelled: 360
Percentage of fuel weight on drive axles: 30%
  • 300 pounds
  • 210 pounds
  • 144 pounds
  • 200 pounds
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

To calculate the percentage of a value, you simply multiply the total value times the percentage you're looking for, and then divide by 100.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

If you're getting 6 miles per gallon and you travel 360 miles:

360/6 = 60 gallons of fuel

60 gallons x 8 pounds per gallon = 480 pounds of total fuel burned off

Since 30% of the weight of fuel goes on our drive axles, we need to know what 30% of 480 is:

30 x 480 / 100 = 144 pounds coming off the drive axles
Prev
Next
Sliding the 5th wheel will change the weight distribution almost exclusively between which sets of axles?
  • The steer axle and the trailer tandems
  • The steer axle is the only one affected by fuel
  • The drive axles and the trailer tandems
  • The steer axle and the drive axles
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Sliding the 5th wheel will change the weight distribution almost exclusively between the steer axle and the drive axles.
Prev
Next
If you slide the 5th wheel toward the nose of the tractor, what will be the effect?
  • You will decrease the weight on the steer axle and take weight off the drive axles
  • You will decrease the weight on the steer axle and it will have no effect on the drive axles
  • You will increase the weight on the steer axle and increase the weight on the drive axles
  • You will increase the weight on the steer axle and take weight off the drive axles
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

If you slide the 5th wheel toward the nose of the tractor you will increase the weight on the steer axle and take weight off the drive axles.
Prev
Next
Using the following numbers, what would be the final result if you moved the 5th wheel forward two holes?

steer axle: 10,800 pounds
drive axles: 34,100 pounds
Weight transfer: 500 pounds per hole
  • steer axle: 10,300 pounds
    drive axles: 34,600 pounds
  • steer axle: 11,800 pounds
    drive axles: 33,100 pounds
  • steer axle: 9,800 pounds
    drive axles: 35,100 pounds
  • steer axle: 11,300 pounds
    drive axles: 33,600 pounds
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

If you slide the 5th wheel toward the nose of the tractor you will increase the weight on the steer axle and take weight off the drive axles.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

If you move it forward 2 holes, then:

2 holes x 500 pounds per hole = 1000 pounds of weight transfer from the drive axles to the steer axle.

10,800 + 1000 = 11,800 pounds on the steer axle after transfer

34,100 - 1000 = 33,100 pounds on the drive axles after transfer
Prev
Next
Using the following numbers, what would be the final result if you moved the 5th wheel back one hole?

steer axle: 12,300 pounds
drive axles: 33,100 pounds
Weight transfer: 500 pounds per hole
  • steer axle: 12,050 pounds
    drive axles: 33,350 pounds
  • steer axle: 12,800 pounds
    drive axles: 32,600 pounds
  • steer axle: 11,300 pounds
    drive axles: 34,100 pounds
  • steer axle: 11,800 pounds
    drive axles: 33,600 pounds
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

If you move the 5th wheel toward the rear of the tractor, you will increase the weight on the drive axles and decrease the weight on the steer axle.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

If you move it back 1 hole, then:

1 holes x 500 pounds per hole = 500 pounds of weight transfer from the steer axle to the drive axles.

12,300 - 500 = 11,800 pounds on the steer axle after transfer

33,100 + 500 = 33,600 pounds on the drive axles after transfer
Prev
Next
You're loaded heavy with 1/2 tank of fuel onboard. Using the following numbers, where should you move the 5th wheel to get it setup properly?

steer axle: 10,800 pounds
drive axles: 34,700 pounds
Weight transfer: 500 pounds per hole
  • Move the 5th wheel back 2 holes
  • Move the 5th wheel forward 1 hole
  • Move the 5th wheel forward 2 holes
  • Move the 5th wheel back 1 hole
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

The best way to make sure the 5th wheel is set properly is to scale the truck with a minimum of 1/2 tank of fuel and a very heavy load. Under those circumstances, you will want the 5th wheel positioned so that the steer tires are as close to 12,000 pounds as possible without going over, and the trailer tandems as close to 34,000 as possible without going over.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Moving the 5th wheel forward takes weight off the drive axles and puts it onto the steer axle. If we move it forward 2 holes and it transfers 500 pounds per hole, then we wind up moving 1000 pounds from the drive axles to the steer axle:

steer axle: 11,800 pounds
drive axles: 33,700 pounds
Prev
Next
You're loaded heavy with 1/2 tank of fuel onboard. Using the following numbers, where should you move the 5th wheel to get it setup properly?

steer axle: 12,300 pounds
drive axles: 33,100 pounds
Weight transfer: 500 pounds per hole
  • Move the 5th wheel back 1 hole
  • Move the 5th wheel forward 2 holes
  • Move the 5th wheel back 2 holes
  • Move the 5th wheel forward 1 hole
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

The best way to make sure the 5th wheel is set properly is to scale the truck with a minimum of 1/2 tank of fuel and a very heavy load. Under those circumstances, you will want the 5th wheel positioned so that the steer tires are as close to 12,000 pounds as possible without going over, and the trailer tandems as close to 34,000 as possible without going over.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

If you move the 5th wheel toward the rear of the tractor, you will increase the weight on the drive axles and decrease the weight on the steer axle. If we move it back 1 hole and it transfers 500 pounds per hole, then we wind up moving 500 pounds from the steer axle to the drive axles:

steer axle: 11,800 pounds
drive axles: 33,600 pounds
Prev
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