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Logbook Example #25

Violations: There is a 30 minute break violation from 11:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. and again from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver was eligible to drive for up to 11 hours beginning at 4:00 a.m. The driver drove only 6 hours, within the legal limit.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: The driver went on-duty at 4:00 a.m. and was eligible to drive during the next 8 consecutive hours until noon. By that time, a 30 minute off duty break would be required. However, the driver never went off duty within that 8 hour period. Therefore, at noon, the driver was in violation of the 30-minute break provision. Since drivers may remain on duty without a 30 minute break, there is no violation during the on-duty hours of 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. However, at 5 p.m. the driver returned to driving but still never took 30 minutes off-duty. As such, this driver was in violation of the 30-minute break provision again from the hours of 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. To remain in compliance, the driver should have taken a 30 minute off duty break at 10:00 a.m. This would have kept the driver in compliance for both driving periods.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available beginning at 4:00 a.m. The driver stopped driving a CMV upon reaching the 14 hour limit at 6:00 p.m., so there are no violations.

Logging Example #26

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There are no violations.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 2:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver used those 11 hours by 3:00 p.m. when he or she entered the sleeper berth for 8 consecutive hours. Because the driver accumulated at least 10 hours of rest using a combination of at least 8 consecutive hours in a sleeper berth and another break of at least 2 consecutive hours, he or she was eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the calculation point to the end of the first of the two periods of rest, or 9:00 a.m. on Day 1. Starting the calculation from there, the driver accumulated another 11 hours of driving by 4:00 a.m. on Day 2. By 6:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver accumulated another pair of qualifying breaks totaling at least 10 hours. This moves the calculation point again, to the end of the first of the two breaks, or 11:00 p.m. on Day 1. From there, the driver accumulated another 11 hours of driving by noon on Day 2. This pattern continued, with no 11-hour violations.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: A 30 minute break is only required when a driver wants to drive a CMV after being on duty for longer than 8 hours without a 30 consecutive minute off duty break. On both days in this example, the driver was never on duty long enough to require a 30 minute break.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: Calculation of the 14 hour limit begins at 2:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver accumulates 13 hours by 3:00 p.m. before entering the sleeper berth. Because the driver then met the requirements for the split sleeper berth provision, the calculation point moves to the end of the first qualifying break, or 9:00 a.m. on Day 1. So at 11:00 p.m. on Day 1, the driver had accumulated 6 hours (any sleeper berth period of at least 8 but less than 10 consecutive hours is excluded from the 14 hour calculation). By 6:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver accumulated another pair of qualifying breaks totaling at least 10 hours and has not exceeded the 14 hour duty limit. This moves the calculation point again, to the end of the first of the two breaks, or 11:00 p.m. on Day 1. From there, the driver accumulated 13 of 14 hours by noon on Day 2 (any sleeper berth period of less than 8 hours is included in the 14 hour calculation). This pattern continued, with no violations.

Logging Example #27

Violations: There is a 14 hour rule violation from 10:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available starting at midnight. The driver completed 9 hours of driving by 11:00 p.m. and went off duty, so there are no violations of the 11 hour rule.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: Since the driver was never on duty longer than 8 consecutive hours, the 30-minute break provision was never a factor.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at midnight. The driver used 10 of those hours by 10:00 a.m. before entering the sleeper berth for 8 consecutive hours. The 8 consecutive hour sleeper berth period is excluded from the 14-hour limit, but the 1 hour off duty period connected to that sleeper berth period is not. So the 14 hour limit was reached at 10:00 p.m., 4 hours after the end of the sleeper berth period, and the driver violated the rule by continuing to drive for another hour. To remain in compliance, the driver should have either stopped driving at 10:00 p.m., or remained in the sleeper berth from 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Logging Example #28

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is a 30 minute break violation on Day 1 which occurred from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Then, on Day 2, there is another 30 minute break violation from 4:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. as well as an 11 hour rule violation from 4:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. and a 14-hour rule violation from 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. After driving 8 hours (3 + 2 + 3), the driver took 8 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth, which, combined with the earlier 2 consecutive hours in the sleeper from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Day 1, made the driver eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the 11 hour calculation point to the end of the first of the two qualifying breaks, or 9:00 p.m. on Day 1. Between 9:00 p.m. on Day 1 and 8:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had 3 hours of driving, so at 8:00 a.m. there were 8 hours remaining (11 - 3), but he or she continued to drive for an additional 5 hours, after reaching the 11-hour limit at 4:00 p.m.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On Day 1, the driver remained on duty for more than 8 consecutive hours. While remaining on duty for longer than 8 consecutive hours is perfectly legal, the driver may not operate a CMV after being on duty for more than 8 consecutive hours unless a 30 minute break is taken. In the Day 1 example, the driver didn't meet that requirement until being on duty for 9 hours (1 hour beyond the limit), thereby violating the 30 minute break provision from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The driver also failed to take a 30 minute break on Day 2. Since the driver was on-duty (driving) for more than 8 hours beginning at 4:00 p.m., all drive time after 4:00 p.m. was in violation of the 30 minute break provision.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver reached the 14-hour limit at midnight (the 2 hour sleeper berth period is included in the 14-hour calculation because it is less than 8 hours). The driver then entered the sleeper berth for 8 consecutive hours and took advantage of the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the 14 hour calculation point to 9:00 p.m. on Day 1, the end of the first of the two qualifying breaks. Counting forward from there (and excluding the 8-hour sleeper period), the driver had 11 hours remaining as of 8:00 a.m. on Day 2. Those 11 hours were used up by 7:00 p.m. and the driver drove for 2 hours past the 14-hour on-duty limit. To remain in compliance, the driver should have stopped driving at 4:00 p.m. on Day 2. If he or she had gone off duty or in the sleeper berth for at least 2 consecutive hours at that time, the calculation point would have moved to 8:00 a.m. on Day 2 and the driver would have remained in compliance.

The 30 minute off duty break does not have to occur at exactly 8 hours since first going on duty. The rule simply states that a driver may not drive a CMV if it has been longer than 8 hours since at least a 30 minute period off duty.
You may continue to work and/or drive a non-commercial motor vehicle after reaching the 14 hour limit, as long as you do not drive a CMV. After 6:00 p.m., this driver would need 10 consecutive hours off duty before again driving a CMV.
If the off duty period from 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. had been spent in a sleeper berth, it would have been excluded from the 14 hour calculation.
When using the sleeper berth provision, the 2 hour break can fall before or after the 8 hour sleeper berth break.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Commercial Motor Vehicle:

A commercial motor vehicle is any vehicle used in commerce to transport passengers or property with either:

  • A gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more
  • A gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more which includes a towed unit with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds
  • CMV:

    Commercial Motor Vehicle

    A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

    • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
    • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
    • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
    • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
    • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

    HOS:

    Hours Of Service

    HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

What time does a 14 hour rule violation occur?

  • At 6:00 p.m.
  • At 3:00 p.m.
  • At 5:00 p.m.
  • There is no 14 hour rule violation in this example

Quote From The CDL Manual:


Violations: There is a 30 minute break violation from 11:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. and again from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.



Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver was eligible to drive for up to 11 hours beginning at 4:00 a.m. The driver drove only 6 hours, within the legal limit.



Explanation - 30 Minute Break: The driver went on duty at 4:00 a.m. and was eligible to drive during the next 8 consecutive hours until noon. By that time, a 30 minute off duty break would be required. However, the driver never went off duty within that 8 hour period. Therefore, at noon, the driver was in violation of the 30 minute break provision. Since drivers may remain on duty without a 30 minute break, there is no violation during the on duty hours of 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. However, at 5 p.m. the driver returned to driving but still never took 30 minutes off duty. As such, this driver was in violation of the 30 minute break provision again from the hours of 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. To remain in compliance, the driver should have taken a 30 minute off duty break at 10:00 a.m. This would have kept the driver in compliance for both driving periods.



Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available beginning at 4:00 a.m. The driver stopped driving a CMV upon reaching the 14 hour limit at 6:00 p.m., so there are no violations.

Next

At what time does a violation occur on this log?

  • 9:00 p.m.
  • 8:00 p.m.
  • 10:00 p.m.
  • 7:00 p.m.

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Violations: There is a 14 hour rule violation from 10:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available starting at midnight. The driver completed 9 hours of driving by 11:00 p.m. and went off duty, so there are no violations of the 11 hour rule.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: Since the driver was never on duty longer than 8 consecutive hours, the 30 minute break provision was never a factor.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at midnight. The driver used 10 of those hours by 10:00 a.m. before entering the sleeper berth for 8 consecutive hours. The 8 consecutive hour sleeper berth period is excluded from the 14 hour limit, but the 1 hour off duty period connected to that sleeper berth period is not. So the 14 hour limit was reached at 10:00 p.m., 4 hours after the end of the sleeper berth period, and the driver violated the rule by continuing to drive for another hour. To remain in compliance, the driver should have either stopped driving at 10:00 p.m., or remained in the sleeper berth from 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

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Next

Which day below contains at least 1 violation?

Day 1

Day 2

  • Day 2 contains at least 1 violation
  • There are no violations on either day
  • Both days contain violations
  • Day 1 contains at least 1 violation

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations:There are no violations.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 2:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver used those 11 hours by 3:00 p.m. when he or she entered the sleeper berth for 8 consecutive hours. Because the driver accumulated at least 10 hours of rest using a combination of at least 8 consecutive hours in a sleeper berth and another break of at least 2 consecutive hours, he or she was eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the calculation point to the end of the first of the two periods of rest, or 9:00 a.m. on Day 1. Starting the calculation from there, the driver accumulated another 11 hours of driving by 4:00 a.m. on Day 2. By 6:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver accumulated another pair of qualifying breaks totaling at least 10 hours. This moves the calculation point again, to the end of the first of the two breaks, or 11:00 p.m. on Day 1. From there, the driver accumulated another 11 hours of driving by noon on Day 2. This pattern continued, with no 11 hour violations.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: A 30 minute break is only required when a driver wants to drive a CMV after being on duty for longer than 8 hours without a 30 consecutive minute off duty break. On both days in this example, the driver was never on duty long enough to require a 30 minute break.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: Calculation of the 14 hour limit begins at 2:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver accumulates 13 hours by 3:00 p.m. before entering the sleeper berth. Because the driver then met the requirements for the split sleeper berth provision, the calculation point moves to the end of the first qualifying break, or 9:00 a.m. on Day 1. So at 11:00 p.m. on Day 1, the driver had accumulated 6 hours (any sleeper berth period of at least 8 but less than 10 consecutive hours is excluded from the 14 hour calculation). By 6:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver accumulated another pair of qualifying breaks totaling at least 10 hours and has not exceeded the 14 hour duty limit. This moves the calculation point again, to the end of the first of the two breaks, or 11:00 p.m. on Day 1. From there, the driver accumulated 13 of 14 hours by noon on Day 2 (any sleeper berth period of less than 8 hours is included in the 14 hour calculation). This pattern continued, with no violations.

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Next

Which day below contains a 30 minute break violation?

Day 1

Day 2

  • There are no 30 minute break violations on either day
  • Both days contain at least one 30 minute break violation
  • Day 2 contains at least one 30 minute break violation
  • Day 1 contains at least one 30 minute break violation

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is a 30 minute break violation on Day 1 which occurred from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Then, on Day 2, there is another 30 minute break violation from 4:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. as well as an 11 hour rule violation from 4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. and a 14 hour rule violation from 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. After driving 8 hours (3 + 2 + 3), the driver took 8 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth, which, combined with the earlier 2 consecutive hours in the sleeper from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Day 1, made the driver eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the 11 hour calculation point to the end of the first of the two qualifying breaks, or 9:00 p.m. on Day 1. Between 9:00 p.m. on Day 1 and 8:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had 3 hours of driving, so at 8:00 a.m. there were 8 hours remaining (11 - 3), but he or she continued to drive for an additional 5 hours, after reaching the 11 hour limit at 4:00 p.m.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On Day 1, the driver remained on duty for more than 8 consecutive hours. While remaining on duty for longer than 8 consecutive hours is perfectly legal, the driver may not operate a CMV after being on duty for more than 8 consecutive hours unless a 30 minute break is taken. In the Day 1 example, the driver didn't meet that requirement until being on duty for 9 hours (1 hour beyond the limit), thereby violating the 30 minute break provision from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The driver also failed to take a 30 minute break on Day 2. Since the driver was on duty (driving) for more than 8 hours beginning at 4:00 p.m., all drive time after 4:00 p.m. was in violation of the 30 minute break provision.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver reached the 14 hour limit at midnight (the 2 hour sleeper berth period is included in the 14 hour calculation because it is less than 8 hours). The driver then entered the sleeper berth for 8 consecutive hours and took advantage of the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the 14 hour calculation point to 9:00 p.m. on Day 1, the end of the first of the two qualifying breaks. Counting forward from there (and excluding the 8-hour sleeper period), the driver had 11 hours remaining as of 8:00 a.m. on Day 2. Those 11 hours were used up by 7:00 pm

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