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Driver's Handbook on Cargo Securement - Chapter 4: Dressed Lumber and Similar Building Materials

Positioning and Securing Bundles Continued

Requirements for securing bundles in two or more tiers

There are four options for securing bundles of dressed lumber that are transported in two or more tiers. Choose one of the four.

Option #1:

To block side-to-side movement, block the bundles with stakes on the sides of the vehicle. Secure the bundles by tiedowns laid out over the top tier.

Option #2:

To block side-to-side movement, use blocking or high friction devices between the tiers. Secure the bundles by tiedowns laid out over the top tier, as outlined in Section 2.

High Friction Devices
  • Friction mat
  • Piece of wood with friction surface
  • Cleated mat
  • Other specialized equipment
Option #3:

Place bundles directly on top of other bundles or on spacers.

Tiedowns over the second tier of bundles or at 1.85 m (6 ft) above the trailer deck (whichever is greater).

Tiedowns for other multiple tiers not over 1.85 m (6 ft) above the trailer.

Tiedowns over the top tier of bundles with a minimum of 2 tiedowns over each top bundle longer than 1.52 m (5 ft).

Spacer Requirements
  • The length of spacers must provide support to all pieces in the bottom row of the bundle.
  • The width of each spacer must be equal or greater than the height.
  • Spacers must provide good interlayer friction.
  • If spacers are comprised of layers of material, the layers must be unitized or fastened together to ensure that the spacer performs as a single piece of material.
Option #4:

Secure the bundles by tiedowns over each tier of bundles in accordance with the general cargo securement requirements.

Use at least 2 tiedowns over each bundle on the top tier that is longer than 1.52 m (5 ft).

Suggestion to Increase Safety

Choose one of two options for stopping forward motion:

  • Option #1

    Place bundles against bulkhead/front end structure.

  • Option #2

    When different tiers need to be secured, use a combination of blocking equipment and tiedowns.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

When securing building materials, spacer requirements include all of the following except:
  • If spacers are comprised of layers of material, the layers must be unitized or fastened together to ensure that the spacer performs as a single piece of material.
  • Spacers must provide good interlayer friction.
  • The height of each spacer must be equal or greater than the width.
  • The length of spacers must provide support to all pieces in the bottom row of the bundle.

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Spacer Requirements
  • The length of spacers must provide support to all pieces in the bottom row of the bundle.
  • The width of each spacer must be equal or greater than the height.
  • Spacers must provide good interlayer friction.
  • If spacers are comprised of layers of material, the layers must be unitized or fastened together to ensure that the spacer performs as a single piece of material.
Next
When securing building materials, how many tiedowns are required for top tier bundles longer than 5 ft?
  • It depends on weight
  • 0
  • 2
  • 1

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Tiedowns over the top tier of bundles with a minimum of 2 tiedowns over each top bundle longer than 1.52 m (5 ft).

Prev
Next
Methods of securing building materials against forward motion include:
  • Employing blocking equipment.
  • Using tiedowns.
  • Placing bundles against the bulkhead or front end.
  • These are all valid methods.

Quote From The CDL Manual:

  • Option #1

    Place bundles against bulkhead/front end structure.

  • Option #2

    When different tiers need to be secured, use a combination of blocking equipment and tiedowns.

Prev
Next
High friction securement devices include:
  • These can all be used for securement.
  • Cleated mat
  • Friction mat
  • Piece of wood with friction surface

Quote From The CDL Manual:

High Friction Devices
  • Friction mat
  • Piece of wood with friction surface
  • Cleated mat
  • Other specialized equipment
Prev
Finish
Please select an option
[3,3,4,1]
4

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