Driver's Handbook on Cargo Securement - Chapter 8: Intermodal Containers

What Does This Section Cover?

The requirements in this section apply to the transportation of all intermodal containers.

Note: When securing cargo contained within an intermodal container, follow general cargo securement requirements (Section 2) or, if applicable, follow the commodity specific requirements.

Special Circumstances: Securing Loaded Intermodal Containers on Container Chassis Vehicles

Requirements for securing the container

Secure each intermodal container to the container chassis with securement or integral locking devices that cannot accidentally become unfastened. Integral locking devices do not have to be adjustable.

Note: If necessary, use secondary attachments to ensure that latches remain fastened in transit.

Securing devices must restrain the container from moving more than:

  • 1.27 cm (1/2 in) forward.
  • 1.27 cm (1/2 in) rearward.
  • 1.27 cm (1/2 in) to the right.
  • 1.27 cm (1/2 in) to the left.
  • 2.54 cm (1 in) vertically.

Secure the front and rear of the container independently.

  • 2 latches on the chassis engage anchor points towards or at the front of the container.
  • 2 latches on the chassis engage anchor points towards or at the rear of the container.

If a latch is missing or broken, secure the corner by an alternative means, such as chain or wire rope.

Special Circumstances: Securing Loaded Intermodal Containers on Non-Chassis Vehicles

Requirements for positioning the container
Position the intermodal container so that:

Either all lower corners rest upon the vehicle.

Or the corners are supported by a structure capable of bearing the weight of the container. Independently secure the support structure to the vehicle.

Requirements for securing the container

Secure each container to the vehicle by:

  • Either chains, wire ropes, or integral devices that are fixed to all lower corners.
  • Or crossed chains that are fixed to all upper corners.
  • Or both.

Secure the front and rear of the loaded container independently.

Secure the four corners using tiedowns that are attached to the loaded container.

The tiedowns must have an aggregate working load limit of at least 50% of the loaded weight of the loaded container.

Attach each chain, wire rope, or integral locking device to the container in a manner that prevents it from becoming unfastened while in transit.

Special Circumstances: Securing Empty Intermodal Containers on Non-Chassis Vehicles

Empty intermodal containers transported on non-chassis vehicles do not have to have all lower corners resting upon the vehicle or supported by a structure if they meet each of the following four requirements:

  • Requirement 1:

    The container is balanced and positioned on the vehicle so it is stable before adding tiedowns or other securing devices.

  • Requirement 2:

    The container does not hang over the front or rear of the trailer by more than 1.5 m (5 ft).

  • Requirement 3:

    The container does not interfere with the vehicles maneuverability.

  • Requirement 4:

    The container is secured to prevent side-to-side, forward, rearward, and upward movement by:

    • Either by following the requirements for loaded containers.
    • Or by following the general cargo securement requirements for tiedowns.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

How many anchor points should be used to secure an intermodal container on a chassis vehicle?
  • 2 latches each at or near both the front and rear.
  • 2 latches in the middle, and 2 at the rear.
  • 2 latches in the front and 2 in the middle.
  • 4 latches total, anywhere on the trailer.

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Secure the front and rear of the container independently.

  • 2 latches on the chassis engage anchor points towards or at the front of the container.
  • 2 latches on the chassis engage anchor points towards or at the rear of the container.
Next
When securing an intermodal container on a chassis, what is the maximum allowable vertical travel when secured?
  • 1 inch
  • 2 inches
  • 1/2 inch
  • 2 1/2 inches

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Securing devices must restrain the container from moving more than:

  • 1.27 cm (1/2 in) forward.
  • 1.27 cm (1/2 in) rearward.
  • 1.27 cm (1/2 in) to the right.
  • 1.27 cm (1/2 in) to the left.
  • 2.54 cm (1 in) vertically.
Prev
Next
What is the minimum WLL required of tiedowns securing loaded intermodal containers on non-chassis vehicles?
  • 20% of the loaded weight of the container.
  • 80% of the loaded weight of the container.
  • 50% of the loaded weight of the container.
  • It depends on the length of the container.

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Secure each container to the vehicle by:

  • Either chains, wire ropes, or integral devices that are fixed to all lower corners.
  • Or crossed chains that are fixed to all upper corners.
  • Or both.

Secure the front and rear of the loaded container independently.

Secure the four corners using tiedowns that are attached to the loaded container.

The tiedowns must have an aggregate working load limit of at least 50% of the loaded weight of the loaded container.

Attach each chain, wire rope, or integral locking device to the container in a manner that prevents it from becoming unfastened while in transit.

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