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4.2 Loading and Trip Start

Do not allow riders to leave carry-on baggage in a doorway or aisle. There should be nothing in the aisle that might trip other riders. Secure baggage and freight in ways that avoid damage and:

  • Allow the driver to move freely and easily.
  • Allow riders to exit by any window or door in an emergency.
  • Protect riders from injury if carryons fall or shift.

Hazardous Materials

Watch for cargo or baggage containing hazardous materials. Most hazardous materials cannot be carried on a bus. Riders sometimes board a bus with an unlabeled hazardous material. They may not know it is unsafe. Do not allow riders to carry on common hazards such as car batteries or gasoline.

The Federal Hazardous Materials Table shows which materials are hazardous. They pose a risk to health, safety and property during transportation. The rules require shippers to mark containers of hazardous material with the materialʼs name, ID number and hazard label. There are nine different 4-inch, diamond-shaped hazard labels like the examples shown in Figure 4-1. A chart showing all the labels is in the back of this manual. Watch for the diamond-shaped labels. Do not transport any hazardous material unless you are sure the rules allow it.

Figure 4-1
Examples of Labels

Forbidden Hazardous Materials

Buses may carry small-arms ammunition, emergency shipments of drugs, chemicals and hospital supplies. You can carry small amounts of some other hazardous materials if the shipper cannot send them any other way. Buses must never carry:

  • Division 2.3 POISONOUS (Toxic) GAS.
  • Division 6.1 EXTREMELY DANGEROUS POISONOUS (Toxic) LIQUID.
  • Paranitroaniline.
  • More than 45 kg (100 pounds) of a solid Division 6.1 Poison.
  • More than 225 kg (500 pounds) total of allowable hazardous materials and no more than 45 kg (100 pounds) of any one class.

Standee Line

No rider may stand forward of the rear of the driverʼs seat. Buses designed to allow standing must have a 2-inch line on the floor or some other means of showing riders where they cannot stand. This is called the standee line. All standing riders must stay behind it.

When arriving at the destination or intermediate stops, announce:

  • The location.
  • Reason for stopping.
  • Next departure time.
  • Bus number.

Remind riders to take carry-ons with them if they get off the bus. If the aisle is on a lower level than the seats, remind riders of the step down. It is best to tell them before coming to a complete stop.

Charter bus drivers should not allow riders on the bus until departure time. This will help prevent theft or vandalism of the bus.

Test Your Knowledge

  • Name some things to check in the interior of a bus during pre-trip inspection?
  • What are some hazardous materials you can transport by bus?
  • What are some hazardous materials you cannot transport by bus?
  • What is a standee line?
  • What three kinds of emergency equipment must you have?
  • What is the minimum tread depth for front tires?
  • For other tires?

Study sections 4.1 and 4.2 if you can't answer all of these questions.

Proper storage of carry-on luggage is something you'll need to know for the written exam. Pay special attention to the previous two sentences as well as the list below.
While you should be aware of hazardous materials which are prohibited on busses, you should especially pay attention to which hazardous materials are allowed on busses.
Make sure you are very familiar with what the standee line is. This will very likely appear on your written exam. Especially remember that no rider may stand in front of the standee line.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

When transporting passengers on a bus, when may passengers leave carry-on baggage in a doorway or aisle?
  • Baggage can only be placed in an aisle if it is tied or secured to a seat
  • No obstacles should ever block an aisle or doorway which may trip other riders.
  • Baggage may block doors as long as it is moved when the bus is loading or unloading passengers
  • Baggage can only be placed in the aisle if the owner of the baggage is available to move it when necessary

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Do not allow riders to leave carry-on baggage in a doorway or aisle. There should be nothing in the aisle that might trip other riders. Secure baggage and freight in ways that avoid damage and:

  • Allow the driver to move freely and easily.
  • Allow riders to exit by any window or door in an emergency.
  • Protect riders from injury if carryons fall or shift.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Even if you don't plan on obtaining a CDL passenger endorsement, you will still required to have an understanding of some basic passenger rules and regulations for the written exam.

Next
Buses are prohibited from carrying all of the following hazardous materials except:
  • Paranitroaniline
  • Extremely dangerous poisonous (toxic) liquid
  • Poisonous (toxic) gas
  • Small-arms ammunition

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Buses may carry small-arms ammunition, emergency shipments of drugs, chemicals and hospital supplies. You can carry small amounts of some other hazardous materials if the shipper cannot send them any other way. Buses must never carry:

  • Division 2.3 POISONOUS (Toxic) GAS.
  • Division 6.1 EXTREMELY DANGEROUS POISONOUS (Toxic) LIQUID.
  • Paranitroaniline.
  • More than 45 kg (100 pounds) of a solid Division 6.1 Poison.
  • More than 225 kg (500 pounds) total of allowable hazardous materials and no more than 45 kg (100 pounds) of any one class.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Even if you don't plan to obtain a passenger endorsement for your CDL, you will still be required to have a basic understanding of some general rules and regulations for transporting passengers.

Prev
Next
Which of the following hazardous materials is a bus allowed to transport?
  • Small-arms ammunition
  • All of these can legally be carried on a commercial bus
  • Emergency shipments of medical drugs or chemicals
  • Hospital supplies

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Buses may carry small-arms ammunition, emergency shipments of drugs, chemicals and hospital supplies. You can carry small amounts of some other hazardous materials if the shipper cannot send them any other way.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Even if you don't plan to obtain a passenger endorsement for your CDL, you will still be required to have a basic understanding of some general rules and regulations for transporting passengers.

Prev
Next
When arriving at the destination or intermediate stops, bus drivers should announce several things including:
  • The current date
  • The temperature
  • The bus number
  • The drivers first name

Quote From The CDL Manual:

When arriving at the destination or intermediate stops, announce:

  • The location,
  • Reason for stopping,
  • Next departure time, and
  • Bus number.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Even if you don't plan to obtain a passenger endorsement for your CDL, you will still be required to have a basic understanding of some general rules and regulations for transporting passengers.

Prev
Next
On a commercial bus what is the standee line?
  • A line at the back of the bus, indicating an area where passengers may not stand
  • A line around each passenger seat to make sure standees don't stand too close to seated passengers
  • A line at the front of the bus that all passengers must stay behind
  • A bright line on the exit steps to help ensure people don't fall

Quote From The CDL Manual:

No rider may stand forward of the rear of the driver's seat. Buses designed to allow standing must have a 2-inch line on the floor or some other means of showing riders where they cannot stand. This is called the standee line. All standing riders must stay behind it.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Even if you don't plan to obtain a passenger endorsement for your CDL, you will still be required to have a basic understanding of some general rules and regulations for transporting passengers.

Prev
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