TruckingTruth logo

9.1 Intent of Regulations

Transporting hazardous materials can be risky. The regulations are intended to protect you, those around you, and the environment. They tell shippers how to package the materials safely and drivers how to load, transport and unload the materials. These are called “containment rules.”

To communicate the risk, shippers must warn drivers and others about materials hazards. The regulations require shippers to put hazard warning labels on packages, provide proper shipping papers, emergency response information and placards. These steps communicate the hazard to the shipper , the carrier and the driver.

To obtain a Hazardous Materials Endorsement on a CDL you must initially and at each renewal pass a security background check and a written exam about transporting hazardous materials. To pass the exam, you must know how to:

  • Identify hazardous materials.
  • Safely load shipments.
  • Properly placard your vehicle in accordance with the rules.
  • Safely transport shipments.

Learn the rules and follow them. Following the rules reduces the risk of injury from hazardous materials. Taking shortcuts by breaking rules is unsafe and against the law.

Inspect your vehicle before and during each trip. Law enforcement officers may stop and inspect your vehicle. When stopped, they may check your shipping papers, vehicle placards, the hazardous materials endorsement on your driverʼs license, and your knowledge of hazardous materials.

9.2 Hazardous Materials Transportation

The shipper:
  • Sends products from one place to another by truck, rail, vessel or airplane.
  • Uses the hazardous materials regulations to decide the productʼs:
    • Proper shipping name
    • Hazard class
    • Identification number
    • Correct packaging
    • Correct label and markings
    • Correct placard
  • Must package, mark and label the materials, prepare shipping papers, provide emergency response information and supply placards.
  • Certify on the shipping paper that the shipment has been prepared according to the rules (unless you are pulling cargo tanks supplied by you or your employer).
The carrier:
  • Takes the shipment from the shipper to its destination.
  • Prior to transportation, checks that the shipper correctly described, marked, labeled and otherwise prepared the shipment for transportation.
  • Refuses improper shipments.
  • Reports accidents and incidents involving hazardous materials to the proper government agency.
The driver:
  • Makes sure the shipper has identified, marked and labeled the hazardous materials properly.
  • Refuses leaking packages and shipments.
  • Placards his vehicle when loading, if required.
  • Safely transports the shipment without delay.
  • Follows all special rules about transporting hazardous materials.
  • Keeps hazardous materials shipping papers and emergency response information in the proper place.

9.3 Communication Rules

Some words and phrases have special meanings when talking about hazardous materials. Some of these may differ from meanings you are used to. The words and phrases in this section may be on your exam. The meanings of other important words are in the glossary at the end of Section 9.

Hazard Class

A materialʼs hazard class reflects the risks associated with it. The hazard class of a hazardous material is indicated by its class (or division) number, its class name, or by the letters “ORM-D.” Figure 9-1 below lists class numbers, division numbers, class or division names and those sections of this subchapter that contain definitions for classifying hazardous materials, including forbidden materials.

Figure 9-1
Hazardous Materials Hazard Class/Division Table

Class #
Division #
Example
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
Dynamite
Flares
Display Fireworks
Ammunition
Blasting Agents
Explosive Devices
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
Propane
Helium
Fluorine, Compressed
3
-
Gasoline
4
4.1
4.2
4.3
Ammonium Picrate, Wetted
White Phosphorus
Sodium
5
5.1
5.2
Ammonium Nitrate
Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide
6
6.1
6.2
Potassium Cyanide
Anthrax Virus
7
-
Uranium
8
-
Battery Fluid
9
-
Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PBS)
-
-
Food Flavorings, Medicines
-
-
Fuel Oil
You may be asked what "containment rules" are on the written exam, so make sure you're familiar with the above paragraph.
The written exam very frequently asks about the different roles and responsibilities of the shipper, the carrier, and the driver. Make sure you are very familiar with each and how they differ, as listed below.
While you do not need to memorize the below table, you should familiarize yourself with it and understand how different classes of hazardous materials differ from each other.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

Which of these is a shipper's responsibility for HAZMAT placarded loads?
  • Report en-route accidents to proper government agencies
  • All of these are shipper responsibilities
  • Placard the vehicle
  • Package, mark and label the materials

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The shipper:

  • Sends products from one place to another by truck, rail, vessel or airplane.
  • Uses the hazardous materials regulations to decide the product's:
    • Proper shipping name
    • Hazard class
    • Identification number
    • Correct packaging
    • Correct label and markings
    • Correct placards
  • Must package, mark and label the materials, prepare shipping papers, provide emergency response information and supply placards.
  • Must certify on the shipping paper that the shipment has been prepared according to the rules (unless you are pulling cargo tanks supplied by you or your employer)

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Next
When stopped by law enforcement, they may:
  • Check for the hazardous materials endorsement on your driver's license
  • Law enforcement may do all of these things
  • Be sure your vehicle placards are properly displayed
  • Check your shipping papers

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Inspect your vehicle before and during each trip. Law enforcement officers may stop and inspect your vehicle. When stopped, they may check your shipping papers, vehicle placards, the hazardous materials endorsement on your driver's license, and your knowledge of hazardous materials.

Prev
Next
When transporting hazardous materials, the driver is responsible for:
  • Making sure the shipper has identified, marked and labeled the hazardous materials properly
  • The driver is responsible for all of these
  • Refusing leaking packages and shipments
  • Properly placarding the vehicle

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The driver:

  • Makes sure the shipper has identified, marked and labeled the hazardous materials properly.
  • Refuses leaking packages and shipments.
  • Placards his vehicle when loading, if required.
  • Safely transports the shipment without delay.
  • Follows all special rules about transporting hazardous materials.
  • Keeps hazardous materials shipping papers and emergency response information in the proper place

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Prev
Next
Shippers are responsible for putting which of the following information on shipping papers when shipping a HAZMAT load:
  • Proper shipping name
  • Identification number
  • All of these must be displayed on the shipping papers
  • Hazard class

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The shipper:

  • Sends products from one place to another by truck, rail, vessel or airplane.
  • Uses the hazardous materials regulations to decide the product's:
  • Proper shipping name
  • Hazard class
  • Identification number
  • Correct packaging
  • Correct label and markings
  • Correct placards
  • Must package, mark and label the materials, prepare shipping papers, provide emergency response information and supply placards.
  • Certify on the shipping paper that the shipment has been prepared according to the rules (unless you are pulling cargo tanks supplied by you or your employer).

TruckingTruth's Advice:

While it is the shippers responsibility to provide you with the correct paperwork (with the correct and required info) as well as the placards for your vehicle, it is up to you to make sure everything is correct.

Prev
Next
To obtain a Hazardous Materials Endorsement on a CDL, you must:
  • Pass an advanced driving test to prove your safe driving abilities
  • Receive a tanker endorsement first
  • Initially and at each renewal pass a security background check and a written exam about transporting hazardous materials
  • Initially and at each renewal date undergo a detailed HAZMAT specific DOT Physical exam

Quote From The CDL Manual:

To obtain a Hazardous Materials Endorsement on a CDL, you must initially and at each renewal pass a security background check and a written exam about transporting hazardous materials.

Prev
Next
When transporting hazardous materials, the carrier is responsible for which of the following?
  • Install proper placards on the vehicle
  • Reports accidents and incidents involving hazardous materials to the proper government agency
  • The carrier is not responsible for any of these
  • Must package, mark and label the materials, prepare shipping papers, provide emergency response information and supply placards

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The carrier:

  • Takes the shipment from the shipper to its destination.
  • Prior to transportation, checks that the shipper correctly described, marked, labeled and otherwise prepared the shipment for transportation.
  • Refuses improper shipments.
  • Reports accidents and incidents involving hazardous materials to the proper government agency

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Prev
Next
What is a Hazard Class?
  • Indicates how a product must be packaged
  • Reflects the risks associated with a hazardous material
  • Shows which type of CDL HAZMAT endorsement is needed
  • Determines whether the hazardous material can be transported with a tanker truck or not

Quote From The CDL Manual:

A material's hazard class reflects the risks associated with it. The hazard class of a hazardous material is indicated by its class (or division) number, its class name, or by the letters "ORM-D." Figure 9-1 below lists class numbers, division numbers, class or division names and those sections of this subchapter that contain definitions for classifying hazardous materials, including forbidden materials.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be mindful of the hazard classes you are carrying as that will determine which placards are required during transportation

Prev
Next
What are Containment Rules?
  • Require all different classes of hazardous materials to be shipped in separate trailers to avoid mixing of chemicals
  • Rules for isolating a spilled hazardous material
  • They tell shippers how to package the materials safely and drivers how to load, transport and unload the materials
  • Requirements that state trucks carrying hazardous materials are not allowed in residential neighborhoods

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Transporting hazardous materials can be risky. The regulations are intended to protect you, those around you, and the environment. They tell shippers how to package the materials safely and drivers how to load, transport and unload the materials. These are called "containment rules."

Prev
Next
When transporting hazardous materials, all of the following are the driver's responsibility, except:
  • Refuse leaking packages and shipments
  • Keep hazardous materials shipping papers and emergency response information in the proper place
  • Placard the vehicle
  • Prepare shipping papers

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The driver:

  • Makes sure the shipper has identified, marked and labeled the hazardous materials properly.
  • Refuses leaking packages and shipments.
  • Placards his vehicle when loading, if required.
  • Safely transports the shipment without delay.
  • Follows all special rules about transporting hazardous materials.
  • Keeps hazardous materials shipping papers and emergency response information in the proper place

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Prev
Next
Which of the following is NOT the carrier's responsibility?
  • Package, mark, and label the materials
  • Prior to transportation, checks that the shipper correctly described, marked, labeled and otherwise prepared the shipment for transportation
  • Refuse improper shipments
  • Report accidents and incidents involving hazardous materials to the proper government agency

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The carrier:

  • Takes the shipment from the shipper to its destination.
  • Prior to transportation, checks that the shipper correctly described, marked, labeled and otherwise prepared the shipment for transportation.
  • Refuses improper shipments.
  • Reports accidents and incidents involving hazardous materials to the proper government agency

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Prev
Next
By obtaining a hazardous materials endorsement, you must be able to do all of these things except:
  • Identify hazardous materials
  • Safely load shipments
  • Know how to clean a HAZMAT spill
  • Properly placard your vehicle in accordance with the rules

Quote From The CDL Manual:

To obtain a Hazardous Materials Endorsement on a CDL, you must initially and at each renewal pass a security background check and a written exam about transporting hazardous materials. To pass the exam, you must know how to:

  • Identify hazardous materials.
  • Safely load shipments.
  • Properly placard your vehicle in accordance with the rules.
  • Safely transport shipments.

Learn the rules and follow them. Following the rules reduces the risk of injury from hazardous materials. Taking shortcuts by breaking rules is unsafe and against the law.

Prev
Next
Shippers use hazardous materials regulations to decide the product's:
  • Health tag
  • Shipping route
  • All of these answers are correct
  • Hazard class and identification number

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The shipper:

  • Sends products from one place to another by truck, rail, vessel or airplane.
  • Uses the hazardous materials regulations to decide the product's:
    • Proper shipping name
    • Hazard class
    • Identification number
    • Correct packaging
    • Correct label and markings
    • Correct placards
  • Must package, mark and label the materials, prepare shipping papers, provide emergency response information and supply placards.
  • Must certify on the shipping paper that the shipment has been prepared according to the rules (unless you are pulling cargo tanks supplied by you or your employer)

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Prev
Next
Shippers have the following responsibility in regards to hazardous cargo:
  • Provide proper shipping papers, emergency response information and placards to the carrier or driver
  • Must warn drivers and others about materials hazards
  • Shippers must do all of these things in regards to hazardous materials
  • Put hazard warning labels on packages

Quote From The CDL Manual:

To communicate the risk, shippers must warn drivers and others about materials hazards. The regulations require shippers to put hazard warning labels on packages, provide proper shipping papers, emergency response information and placards. These steps communicate the hazard to the shipper, the carrier and the driver.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Prev
Next
When sending a hazardous material, the shipper is NOT responsible for:
  • Supplying placards
  • preparing shipping papers
  • Marking and labeling the materials
  • Reporting en-route accidents and incidents involving hazardous materials to the proper government agency

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The shipper:

  • Sends products from one place to another by truck, rail, vessel or airplane.
  • Uses the hazardous materials regulations to decide the product's:
    • Proper shipping name
    • Hazard class
    • Identification number
    • Correct packaging
    • Correct label and markings
    • Correct placards
  • Must package, mark and label the materials, prepare shipping papers, provide emergency response information and supply placards.
  • Must certify on the shipping paper that the shipment has been prepared according to the rules (unless you are pulling cargo tanks supplied by you or your employer)

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Prev
Finish
Please select an option
[4,2,2,3,3,2,2,3,4,1,3,4,3,4]
14

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More