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Hazardous Materials Table

Figure 9-4 shows part of the Hazardous Materials Table. Column 1 tells which shipping mode(s) the entry affects and other information concerning the shipping description. The next five columns show each materialʼs shipping name, hazard class, ID number, packing group and required labels.

Figure 9-4
Part of Hazardous Materials Table

§ 172.101 Hazardous Materials Table
Symbols
(1)
Hazardous Materials Descriptions and Proper Shipping Names
(2)
Hazard Class or Division (3)
Identification Numbers
(4)
PG
(5)
Label Codes
(6)
Special Provisions
(7)
(B)
Packaging Authorizations
(BA) | (BB) | (BC)
G
Toxic solids, self heating, n.o.s.
6.1
UN3124
I
6.1, 4.2
AB, TB, TP33
(BA)
None
(BB)
211
(BC)
242

Column 1

Six different symbols may appear in Column 1:

  • (+) Fixes the proper shipping name, hazard class and packing group to use, even if the material does not meet the hazard class definition
  • (A) Means the hazardous material described in Column 2 is subject to the HMR only when offered or intended for transport by air unless it is a hazardous substance or hazardous waste.
  • (W) Means the hazardous material described in Column 2 is subject to the HMR only when offered or intended for transportation by water unless it is a hazardous substance, hazardous waste.
  • (D) Means the proper shipping name is appropriate for describing materials for domestic transportation, but may not be proper for international transportation.
  • (I) Identifies a proper shipping name that is used to describe materials in international transportation. A different shipping name may be used when only domestic transportation is involved.
  • (G) Identifies the proper shipping names for which one or more technical names of the hazardous material must be entered in parentheses in association with the basic description.

Column 2

Lists the proper shipping names and descriptions of regulated materials. Entries are in alphabetical order so you can more quickly find the right entry. Use the name of the material from the shipping paper. The table shows proper shipping names in Roman type. The shipping paper must show proper shipping names. Names shown in italics are not proper shipping names.

Column 3

Shows a materialʼs hazard class or division, or the entry “Forbidden.” Never transport a “Forbidden” material. Placard shipments are based on the quantity and hazard class. You can decide which placards to use if you know these three things:

  • Materialʼs hazard class.
  • Amount being shipped.
  • Amount of all hazardous materials of all classes on your vehicle.

Column 4

Lists the identification number for each proper shipping name. Identification numbers are preceded by the letters “UN” or “NA.” The letters “NA” are associated with proper shipping names used only within the United States and to and from Canada. The identification number must appear on the shipping paper as part of the shipping description and also appear on the package. It also must appear on cargo tanks and other bulk packaging. Police and firefighters use this number to quickly identify the hazardous materials.

Column 5

Shows the packaging group assigned to a material.

Column 6

Shows the hazard warning label codes shippers must use to determine the proper labels for packages of hazardous materials. Some products require more than one label due to a subsidiary hazard being present. The first label code represents the primary hazard of the material. No label is needed where the table shows the word NONE.

Column 7

Lists the additional (special) provisions that apply to this material. When there is an entry in this column, refer to Section 172.102 of the federal regulations for specific information.

Column 8

A three-part column showing the section numbers covering the exceptions, non-bulk packaging and bulk packaging requirements for each hazardous material.

NOTE: Columns 9 and 10 do not apply to transportation by highway.

Appendix A to §172.101–Hazardous Substances and Reportable Quantities:

DOT and EPA need to know about any spills of hazardous substances named in the List of Hazardous Substances and Reportable Quantities (see Figure 9-5). Column 2 shows each productʼs reportable quantity (RQ). When these materials are being transported in a reportable quantity or greater in one package, the shipper displays the letters RQ on the shipping paper and package. The letters RQ may appear before or after the basic description. You or your employer must report any spill of these materials that occurs in a reportable quantity.

Figure 9-5
Hazardous Substances and Reportable Quantities

If the words POISON INHALATION or TOXIC INHALATION HAZARD appear on the shipping paper, package or label, the rules require that the transport vehicle be placarded with a POISON INHALATION HAZARD or POISON GAS placard, as appropriate. These placards must be used in addition to other placards that may be required by the productʼs hazard class. INHALATION HAZARD materials always require the appropriate placard, even for small amounts of these materials.

Test Your Knowledge

  1. Shippers package in order to (fill in the blank) the material.
  2. Drivers placard their vehicle to (fill in the blank) the risk.
  3. What three things do you need to know to decide which placards (if any) you need?
  4. A hazardous materials ID number must appear on the (fill in the blank) and on the (fill in the blank). The identification number also must appear on cargo tanks and other bulk packagings.
  5. What is outage?
  6. What is the minimum tread depth for front tires?
  7. Where must you keep shipping papers describing hazardous materials?

Study sections 9.1 through 9.9 if you can't answer all of these questions.

You'll need to familiarize yourself with what each column stands for on the Hazardous Materials Table.
Make sure you're familiar with the below symbols as they are sometimes referenced on the written exam.
The below list should be memorized. Knowing these three things is the only way to know which placards to place on your vehicle.
You must know that identification numbers are preceded by the letters "UN" or "NA" as this is often asked about on the written exam.
Remember: If you are hauling a poison inhalation or toxic inhalation hazard, you must have the appropriate placards displayed no matter what amount of material is being hauled. This is in addition to any other placards which are required.

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

If the words POISON INHALATION or TOXIC INHALATION HAZARD appear on the shipping paper, package or label, you must:
  • Use a "dangerous" placard in addition to the placards required by the products hazard class
  • Use poison placards in addition to other placards that may be required by the products hazard class
  • Use a brightly colored banner that says "POISON" above the required placards
  • Use poison placards in place of placards required by the products hazard class

Quote From The CDL Manual:

If the words POISON INHALATION or TOXIC INHALATION HAZARD appear on the shipping paper, package or label, the rules require that the transport vehicle be placarded with a POISON INHALATION HAZARD or POISON GAS placard, as appropriate. These placards must be used in addition to other placards that may be required by the product's hazard class. INHALATION HAZARD materials always require the appropriate placard, even for small amounts of these materials.

Next
Which of the following do you have to know in order to place the correct placards on your vehicle?
  • Amount being shipped
  • Amount of all hazardous materials of all classes on your vehicle
  • Material's hazard class
  • Drivers need to know all of these things in order to place the correct placards on the vehicle

Quote From The CDL Manual:

You can decide which placards to use if you know these three things:

  • Material's hazard class.
  • Amount being shipped.
  • Amount of all hazardous materials of all classes on your vehicle.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

While a shipper will supply you with placards to place on your truck, you must verify they are giving you the proper placards. If you place the incorrect placards on the truck, you will be the one responsible for any citations received.

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Next
DOT and EPA need to know about any spills named in:
  • The List of Hazardous Substances and Reportable Quantities
  • The official list of environmentally dangerous chemicals
  • The HAZMAT protection guide
  • The hazardous materials handbook

Quote From The CDL Manual:

DOT and EPA need to know about any spills of hazardous substances named in the List of Hazardous Substances and Reportable Quantities. When these materials are being transported in a reportable quantity or greater in one package, the shipper displays the letters RQ on the shipping paper and package. The letters RQ may appear before or after the basic description. You or your employer must report any spill of these materials that occurs in a reportable quantity.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Unless there is an immediate life or property threatening emergency, your employer should be the first contact when a hazardous materials spill is detected. Employers are usually well versed in the proper actions that need to be taken and the proper authorities to contact.

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Finish
Please select an option
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