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9.3 Communication Rules (continued)

Shipperʼs Certification

When the shipper packages hazardous materials, he/she certifies that the package has been prepared according to the rules. The signed shipperʼs certification appears on the original shipping paper. The only exceptions are when a shipper is a private carrier transporting their own product, and when the package is provided by the carrier (e.g., a cargo tank). Unless a package is clearly unsafe or does not comply with the HMR, you may accept the shipperʼs certification concerning proper packaging. Some carriers have additional rules about transporting hazardous products. Follow your employerʼs rules when accepting shipments.

Shippers print required markings directly on the package, an attached label or tag. An important package marking is the name of the hazardous material. It is the same name as the one on the shipping paper. When required, the shipper will put the following on the package:

  • Name and address of shipper or consignee (see 172.301(d)).
  • Hazardous materialʼs shipping name and ID number.
  • Required labels.
  • ID number on bulk packages.

Package Markings and Labels

If the rules require it, the shipper also will put RQ or INHALATION-HAZARD on the package. Packages with liquid containers inside also will have package orientation markings with the arrows pointing in the correct upright direction. The labels used always reflect the hazard class of the product. If a package needs more than one label, the labels will be close together, near the proper shipping name.

Vehicle Markings

Large quantities of hazardous materials in non-bulk packaging and certain quantities of INHALATION HAZARD materials in non-bulk packaging require additional marking on the transport vehicle. Specifically:

  • A transport vehicle or freight container that contains 8,820 pounds (4,000 kg) or more non-bulk packages of a single hazardous material must be marked on each side and each end with the identification number for that product. The hazardous material must have the same proper shipping name and identification number and be loaded at one facility. The transport vehicle or freight container must contain no other material, hazardous or otherwise. The identification number may be displayed on the placard, an orange panel or white square on point device.
  • A transport vehicle or freight container that contains 2,205 pounds (1,000 kg) or more non-bulk packages of a material identified as an INHALATION HAZARD, Hazard Zone A or B, must be marked on each side and each end with the identification number for those materials. The inhalation hazard material must have the same proper shipping name and identification number and be loaded all at one facility. The identification number may be displayed on a placard, an orange panel or white square on point device. Please refer to the 172.313 HMTR for specifics.
  • Cargo tanks and other bulk containers require additional markings on the transport vehicle. “Bulk” is defined as a packaging with a maximum capacity greater than 119 gallons for liquid, including but not limited to such packaging as portable tanks, cargo tanks and tank cars. If required identification number markings on bulk containers are not visible while being transported (such as when loaded inside a closed semitrailer), the transport vehicle itself must also display on each side and each end the required identification number markings.

Recognizing Hazardous Materials

Learn to recognize shipments of hazardous materials. To find out if the shipment includes hazardous materials, look at the shipping paper. Does it have:

  • An entry with a proper shipping name, hazard class and ID number?
  • A highlighted entry or one with an X or RQ in the hazardous materials column?

Other clues suggesting hazardous materials include:

  • What business the shipper is in (e.g., paint dealer, chemical supply, scientific supply house, pest control or agricultural supplier, explosives, munitions or fireworks dealer).
  • Tanks with diamond labels or placards on the premises.
  • Type of package being shipped. Cylinders and drums often are used for hazardous materials shipments.
  • Hazard class label, proper shipping name, or ID number on a package.
  • Handling precautions noted.
While you should be familiar with this entire paragraph, this is the most importance sentence to memorize. The signed shipper's certification should appear on the original shipping paper.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

Who signs the Shipper's Certification
  • The driver
  • The shipper
  • The receiver
  • All of these people must sign the shipper's certification

Quote From The CDL Manual:

When the shipper packages hazardous materials, he/she certifies that the package has been prepared according to the rules. The signed shipper's certification appears on the original shipping paper. The only exceptions are when a shipper is a private carrier transporting their own product, and when the package is provided by the carrier (e.g., a cargo tank). Unless a package is clearly unsafe or does not comply with the HMR, you may accept the shipper's certification concerning proper packaging. Some carriers have additional rules about transporting hazardous products. Follow your employer's rules when accepting shipments.

Next
How many gallons will deem a portable tank, cargo tank, or tank car "bulk" freight?
  • 100 gallons
  • 172 gallons
  • 148 gallons
  • 119 gallons

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Cargo tanks and other bulk containers require additional markings on the transport vehicle. "Bulk" is defined as a packaging with a maximum capacity greater than 119 gallons for liquid, including but not limited to such packagings as portable tanks, cargo tanks and tank cars. If required identification number markings on bulk containers are not visible while being transported (such as when loaded inside a closed semitrailer), the transport vehicle itself must also display on each side and each end the required identification number markings.

Prev
Next
A transport vehicle or freight container that contains 8,820 pounds (4,000 kg) or more non-bulk packages of a single hazardous material must:
  • Be marked on each end with the proper shipping name for that product
  • Be marked on each side and each end with the identification number for that product
  • Be marked on each side with the identification number for that product
  • Be marked on each side and each end with the proper shipping name

Quote From The CDL Manual:

A transport vehicle or freight container that contains 8,820 pounds (4,000 kg) or more non-bulk packages of a single hazardous material must be marked on each side and each end with the identification number for that product. The hazardous material must have the same proper shipping name and identification number and be loaded at one facility. The transport vehicle or freight container must contain no other material, hazardous or otherwise. The identification number may be displayed on the placard, an orange panel or white square on point device.

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Next
Where does the Shippers Certification appear?
  • On a separate page placed before the shipping paper
  • The original shipping paper
  • On a separate page placed behind the shipping paper
  • On the emergency response information sheet

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Shipper's Certification When the shipper packages hazardous materials, he/she certifies that the package has been prepared according to the rules. The signed shipper's certification appears on the original shipping paper. The only exceptions are when a shipper is a private carrier transporting their own product, and when the package is provided by the carrier (e.g., a cargo tank). Unless a package is clearly unsafe or does not comply with the HMR, you may accept the shipper's certification concerning proper packaging. Some carriers have additional rules about transporting hazardous products. Follow your employer's rules when accepting shipments.

Shippers print required markings directly on the package, an attached label or tag. An important package marking is the name of the hazardous material. It is the same name as the one on the shipping paper. When required, the shipper will put the following on the package:

  • Name and address of shipper or consignee.
  • Hazardous material's shipping name and ID number.
  • Required labels.
  • ID number on bulk packages.
Prev
Next
Packages containing hazardous liquids will:
  • Be secured in the trailer using a locking device to prevent it from being placed with the wrong end up
  • Have package orientation markings with the arrows pointing in the correct upright direction
  • Be clear in color so that anyone who comes in contact with the package can see that it is a liquid
  • Be packaged in a way that it can be placed upside down or sideways without the risk of a spill

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Packages with liquid containers inside also will have package orientation markings with the arrows pointing in the correct upright direction

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