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9.4 Loading and Unloading (continued from previous page)

Class 7 (radioactive) materials:

Some packages of Class 7 (radioactive) materials bear a number called the “transport index.” The shipper labels these packages Radioactive II or Radioactive III, and prints the packages transport index on the label. Radiation surrounds each package, passing through all nearby packages. To deal with this problem, the number of packages you can load together is controlled. Their closeness to people, animals and unexposed film also is controlled. The transport index tells the degree of control needed during transportation. The total transport index of all packages in a single vehicle must not exceed 50 (see Figure 9.7 below).

Class 8 (corrosive) materials

If loading by hand, load breakable containers of corrosive liquid one by one. Keep them right-side up. Do not drop or roll the containers. Load them onto an even floor surface. Stack carboys only if the lower tiers can bear the weight of the upper tiers safely.

Do not load nitric acid with 50% or greater concentration above any other product or stack more than two high.

Load charged storage batteries so their liquid will not spill. Keep them right-side up. Make sure other cargo will not fall against or short circuit them.

Never load corrosive liquids next to or above:

  • Division 1.4 (explosives C)
  • Class 4 (flammable solids)
  • Class 5 (oxidizers)
  • Division 2.3, Zone B (poisonous gases)

Never load corrosive liquids with:

  • Division 1.1 or 1.2 (explosives A)
  • Division 1.2 or 1.3 (explosives B)
  • Division 1.5 (blasting agents)
  • Division 2.3, Zone A (poisonous gases)
  • Division 4.2 (spontaneously combustible materials)
  • Division 6.1, PG I, Zone A (poison liquids)
Remember: Never drop or roll hazardous materials containers.
You probably don't need to memorize this list completely, but have a general understanding of it. You should never load corrosive liquids next to or above certain types of explosives, flammable solids, oxidizers, and poisonous gases.
As with the above list, you don't need to memorize this list completely. But you should know that corrosive liquids shouldn't be loaded with some explosives, blasting agents, poisonous gases, spontaneously combustible materials, and poison liquids.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

Never load corrosive liquids next to or above:
  • Class 4 (flammable solids)
  • Class 5 (oxidizers)
  • Division 1.4 (explosives C)
  • Never load corrosive liquids next to any of these

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Never load corrosive liquids next to or above:

  • Division 1.4 (explosives C)
  • Class 4 (flammable solids)
  • Class 5 (oxidizers)
  • Division 2.3, Zone B (poisonous gases)
Next
When loading corrosive materials by hand, you should never:
  • Load multiple containers at a time
  • Roll the containers
  • Drop the containers
  • You should never do any of these things

Quote From The CDL Manual:

If loading by hand, load breakable containers of corrosive liquid one by one. Keep them right-side up. Do not drop or roll the containers. Load them onto an even floor surface. Stack carboys only if the lower tiers can bear the weight of the upper tiers safely.

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