TruckingTruth logo

9.6 Hazardous Materials — Driving & Parking (CFR Part 397 Motor Carrier Regulations)

Never park with Division 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3 (Class A or B) explosives within 5 feet of the traveled part of the road. Except for short periods of time needed for vehicle operation necessities (e.g. fueling), do not park within 300 feet of:

  • a bridge, tunnel or building;
  • a place where people gather; or
  • an open fire.

If you must park to do your job, do so only briefly.

Test Your Knowledge

  • What are cargo tanks?
  • How is a portable tank different from a cargo tank?
  • Your engine runs a pump used during delivery of compressed gas. Should you turn off the engine before or after unhooking hoses after delivery?

If you cannot answer all of these questions, study Section 9.5.

Do not park on private property unless the owner is aware of the danger. Someone must always watch the parked vehicle. You may let someone else watch it for you only if your vehicle is on the:

  • shipperʼs property,
  • carrierʼs property, or
  • consigneeʼs property.

You may leave your vehicle unattended in a safe haven. A safe haven is an approved place for parking unattended vehicles loaded with explosives. Local authorities usually make the designation of authorized safe havens.

Parking Placarded Vehicle Not Transporting Division 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3 Explosives

You may park a placarded vehicle (not laden with explosives) within 5 feet of the travelled part of the road only if your work requires it. Do so only briefly. Someone must always watch the vehicle when parked on a public roadway or shoulder. Do not uncouple a trailer and leave it with hazardous material on a public street. Do not park within 300 feet of an open fire.

Attending Parked Vehicles

The person watching a placarded vehicle must:

  • Be in the vehicle awake, not in the sleeper berth , or within 100 feet of the vehicle and have it within clear view,
  • Be aware of the hazards of the materials being transported,
  • Know what to do in emergencies, and
  • Be able to move the vehicle if needed.

No Flares

You may break down and have to use stopped vehicle signals. Use reflective triangles or red electric lights. Never use burning signals, such as flares or fuses, around:

  • A tank used for Class 3 (flammable liquids) or Division 2.1 (flammable gas) whether loaded or empty.
  • A vehicle loaded with Division 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 (Class A or B) explosives.

Route Restrictions

Some states and counties require permits to transport hazardous materials or waste. They may limit the routes you can use. Local rules about routes and permits change often. It is your job as driver to find out if you need permits or must use special routes. Make sure you have all needed papers before starting.

If you work for a carrier, ask your dispatcher about route restrictions or permits. If you are an independent trucker and are planning a new route, check with state agencies where you plan to travel. Some localities prohibit transportation of hazardous materials through tunnels, over bridges or other roadways. Check before you start.

Whenever placarded, avoid heavily populated areas, crowds, tunnels, narrow streets and alleys. Take other routes, even if inconvenient, unless there is no other way. Never drive a placarded vehicle near open fires unless you can safely pass without stopping.

If transporting Division 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3 (Class A or Class B) explosives, you must have a written route plan and follow that plan. Carriers prepare the route plan in advance and give the driver a copy. You may plan the route yourself if you pick up the explosives at a location other than your employerʼs terminal. Write out the plan in advance. Keep a copy of it with you while transporting the explosives. Deliver shipments of explosives only to authorized persons or leave them in locked rooms designed for explosives storage.

A carrier must choose the safest route to transport placarded radioactive material. After choosing the route, the carrier must tell the driver about the radioactive materials and show the route plan.

It is very important that you remember this. It shows up quite often on the written exam. Never park a division 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 explosive within 5 feet of the traveled part of the road.
Remember: Never park a vehicle with explosives within 300 feet of the following places. This list should be memorized.
Remember: If you park a vehicle carrying explosives in any place other than a designated safe haven, the vehicle must be within sight of a qualified person.

This entire paragraph is crucially important. Many questions on the written exam can be pulled from this paragraph. Here are the highlights you should remember:

  • You can park within 5 feet of a roadway but only if work requires it and the vehicle must be watched at all times.
  • Do not park within 300 feet of an open fire. Make sure you remember that distance as it will likely show up on the written exam.
You do not need to memorize the below list. For the purposes of the written exam, you should never use flares around any hazardous materials.
While all hazardous materials are restricted from certain routes, division 1.1, 1.2, and 1.3 explosives are the only divisions which require a written route plan. Make sure you remember that for the written exam.
This is the most important item in the list. Remember: the person watching a placarded vehicle must be inside, awake, and not in the sleeper berth , or within 100 feet and have it within clear view.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

Placarded vehicles should not park within how many feet of a bridge or tunnel?
  • 250 feet
  • 200 feet
  • 300 feet
  • 150 feet

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Never park with Division 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3 (Class A or B) explosives within 5 feet of the traveled part of the road. Except for short periods of time needed for vehicle operation necessities (e.g. fueling), do not park within 300 feet of:

  • a bridge, tunnel or building
  • a place where people gather
  • an open fire.
Next
The person in charge of watching an unattended hazardous materials vehicle must stay within:
  • 25 feet
  • 50 feet
  • 75 feet
  • 100 feet

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The person watching a placarded vehicle must:

  • Be in the vehicle awake, not in the sleeper berth, or within 100 feet of the vehicle and have it within clear view,
  • Be aware of the hazards of the materials being transported,
  • Know what to do in emergencies, and
  • Be able to move the vehicle if needed.
Prev
Next
Placarded vehicles may not park within how many feet of an open fire?
  • 300 feet
  • 200 feet
  • 100 feet
  • 25 feet

Quote From The CDL Manual:

You may park a placarded vehicle (not laden with explosives) within 5 feet of the traveled part of the road only if your work requires it. Do so only briefly. Someone must always watch the vehicle when parked on a public roadway or shoulder. Do not uncouple a trailer and leave it with hazardous material on a public street. Do not park within 300 feet of an open fire.

Prev
Next
When can you use road flares when carrying a hazardous material?
  • Class 1 materials only
  • Road flares should never be used around placarded HAZMAT trucks
  • Class 3 materials only
  • Class 2 materials only

Quote From The CDL Manual:

No Flares You may break down and have to use stopped vehicle signals. Use reflective triangles or red electric lights. Never use burning signals, such as flares or fuses, around:

  • A tank used for Class 3 (flammable liquids) or Division 2.1 (flammable gas) whether loaded or empty.
  • A vehicle loaded with Division 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 (Class A or B) explosives.
Prev
Next
Division 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3 explosives should never be parked within how many feet of a travel lane?
  • 20 feet
  • 5 feet
  • 10 feet
  • 15 feet

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Never park with Division 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3 (Class A or B) explosives within 5 feet of the traveled part of the road. Except for short periods of time needed for vehicle operation necessities (e.g. fueling), do not park within 300 feet of:

  • a bridge, tunnel or building
  • a place where people gather
  • an open fire.
Prev
Next
Who creates the written route plan for transporting division 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 explosives?
  • Shippers prepare the route plan in advance and give the driver a copy
  • Receivers prepare the route plan in advance and give the driver a copy
  • Carriers prepare the route plan in advance and give the driver a copy
  • Drivers are responsible for preparing their own route plan

Quote From The CDL Manual:

If transporting Division 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3 (Class A or Class B) explosives, you must have a written route plan and follow that plan. Carriers prepare the route plan in advance and give the driver a copy. You may plan the route yourself if you pick up the explosives at a location other than your employer's terminal. Write out the plan in advance. Keep a copy of it with you while transporting the explosives. Deliver shipments of explosives only to authorized persons or leave them in locked rooms designed for explosives storage.

Prev
Finish
Please select an option
[3,4,1,2,2,3]
6

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More