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Driving On Upgrades

As you approach an upgrade:
  • Select the proper gear to maintain speed and not lug the engine.
  • Check traffic thoroughly in all directions and move to the right-most or curb lane.
  • If legal to do so, use the 4-way flashers if traveling too slowly for the flow of traffic.

Downgrade

Before starting down the grade:

Downshift as needed to help control engine speed and test brakes by gently applying the foot brake to ensure they are functioning properly. As your vehicle moves down the grade, continue checking traffic in all directions, stay in the right-most or curb lane and, if legal to do so, use the 4-way flashers if your vehicle is moving too slowly for traffic. Increase following distance and observe the following downhill braking procedures:

  • Select a “safe” speed, one that is not too fast for the weight of the vehicle, length and steepness of the grade, weather and road conditions.
  • Once a “safe” speed has been reached, apply the brake hard enough to feel a definite slowdown.
  • When speed has been reduced to 5 mph below the “safe” speed, release the brakes. (This application should last for about 3 seconds.)
  • Once speed has increased to the “safe” speed, repeat the procedure.

Example: If your “safe” speed is 40 mph, you should apply the brakes once your vehicle speed reaches 40 mph. Your brakes should be applied hard enough to reduce your speed to 35 mph. Once your vehicle speed reaches 35 mph, release the brakes. Repeat this procedure as often as necessary until you have reached the end of the downgrade. This braking technique is called "snubbing."

When operating any commercial vehicle, do not ride the clutch, race the engine, change gears or coast while driving down the grade. At the bottom of the grade, be sure to cancel the 4-way flashers.

Not all test routes will contain an area of sufficient grade to test your skills adequately. Therefore, you may be asked to simulate (verbally) driving up and down a steep hill. You must be familiar with the upgrade/downgrade procedures so that you can explain and/or demonstrate them to the examiner at any time during the driving exam.

Be sure to check your local state laws regarding the use of 4-way flashers. Some states will prohibit its use while others require it when driving slowly.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

As you approach an upgrade:
  • Check traffic thoroughly in all directions and move to the right-most or curb lane
  • Select the proper gear to maintain speed an not lug the engine
  • All of these answers are correct
  • If legal to do so, use the 4-way flashers if traveling too slowly for the flow of traffic

Quote From The CDL Manual:

As you approach an upgrade:

- Select the proper gear to maintain speed and not lug the engine.
- Check traffic thoroughly in all directions and move to the right-most or curb lane.
- If legal to do so, use the 4-way flashers if traveling too slowly for the flow of traffic.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Check your local and state laws regarding the use of 4-way flashers while driving slowly. Some states require it, while other states prohibit the practice.

Next
Which of the following is true about downgrades:
  • Race the engine to improve engine braking
  • Lightly ride the clutch during the grade
  • To avoid engine damage, put the gear in neutral and coast down the hill
  • Do not change gears while driving down a grade

Quote From The CDL Manual:

When operating any commercial vehicle, do not ride the clutch, race the engine, change gears or coast while driving down the grade. At the bottom of the grade, be sure to cancel the 4-way flashers.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Always slow down and be in proper gear before a downgrade and never change gears or coast during the downgrade.

Prev
Next
While on a downgrade, how far below your "safe" speed should you go until you release the brakes?
  • 10mph
  • 5mph
  • 15mph
  • 20mph

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Select a safe speed, one that is not too fast for the weight of the vehicle, length and steepness of the grade, weather and road conditions. Once a safe speed has been reached, apply the brake hard enough to feel a definite slowdown.
- When speed has been reduced to 5 mph below the safe speed, release the brakes. (This application should last for about 3 seconds.)
Once speed has increased to the safe speed, repeat the procedure.

Example: If your safe speed is 40 mph, you should apply the brakes once your vehicle speed reaches 40 mph. Your brakes should be applied hard enough to reduce your speed to 35 mph. Once your vehicle speed reaches 35 mph, release the brakes. Repeat this procedure as often as necessary until you have reached the end of the downgrade. This braking technique is called "snubbing."

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Avoid riding the brakes during steep downgrades and choose your correct gear before descending the hill.

Prev
Finish
Please select an option
[3,4,2]
3

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