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13.8 What Must the Log Include?

The regulations do not specify what the log must look like. However, it must include a 24 hour grid and the following information on each page:

  • Date: You must write down the month, day, and year for the beginning of each 24­ hour period.
  • Total driving miles: You must write down the total number of miles you drove during the 24 hour period.
  • Truck or tractor and trailer number: You must write down either the vehicle number(s) assigned by your company, or the license number and licensing state for each truck (and trailer, if any) you drove during the 24 hour period.
  • Name of carrier: You must write down the name of the motor carrier(s) you are working for. If you work for more than one carrier in a 24 hour period, you must list the times you started and finished work for each carrier.
  • Main office address: You must write down your carrier’s main office address.
  • Your signature: You must certify that all of your entries are true and correct by signing your log with your legal name or name of record.
  • Name of co-driver: You must write down the name of your co-driver, if you have one.
  • Time base to be used: You must use the time zone in effect at your home terminal. Even if you cross other time zones, record time as it is at your terminal. All drivers operating out of your home terminal must use the same starting time for the 24 hour period, as designated by your employer.
  • Remarks: This is the area where you must list the city, town, or village, and state abbreviation when a change of duty status occurs. You should also explain any unusual circumstances or log entries that may be unclear when reviewed later, such as using the adverse driving conditions exception.
  • Total hours: You must add and write down the total hours for each duty status at the right side of the grid. The total of the entries must equal 24 hours.
  • Shipping document number(s), or name of shipper and commodity: For each shipment, you must write down a shipping document number (such as a shipping manifest number) or the name of the shipper and what you are hauling.

Here is a real life example of a completed daily log:

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Manifest:

Bill of Lading

An accurate record of everything being shipped on a truck, often times used as a checklist during unloading.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

Your log must include all of the following except:
  • Your home address
  • Truck or tractor and trailer number
  • Total driving miles
  • Your signature

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The regulations do not say what the log form must look like. However, it must include a 24-hour graph grid, which is shown in the regulations, and the following information on each page:

  • Total driving miles: You must write down the total number of miles you drove during the 24-hour period.
  • Main office address: You must write down your carrier’s main office address.
  • Truck or tractor and trailer number: You must write down either the vehicle number(s) assigned by your company, or the license number and licensing state for each truck (and trailer, if any) you drove during the 24-hour period.
  • Your signature: You must certify that all of your entries are true and correct by signing your log with your legal name or name of record.
Next
When you change your duty status, you must document all of the following except:
  • The city or town you are in
  • The state you are in
  • The county you are in
  • All of these must be documented

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Remarks: This is the area where you must list the city, town, or village, and state abbreviation when a change of duty status occurs. You should also explain any unusual circum­stances or log entries that may be unclear when reviewed later, such as encountering adverse driving conditions.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Law enforcement officers will check all of your paperwork, including receipts or toll records, to make sure your logs are showing the correct locations at the correct times.

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What hours must your logbook show?
  • The logbook only needs to show a 12 consecutive hour time frame each day
  • Only your resting hours
  • All 24 hours of every day
  • Only the hours you are on duty or driving

Quote From The CDL Manual:

You must account for every day on your log, even days off, unless you are covered by a logbook exception on any of the days. The log must cover all 24 hours of every day.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

All logbooks must show 24 hours for each day and each hour must be accounted for. Even if you were off duty for an entire 24 hour stretch, you must log the entire day as off duty.
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