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In Cab cameras on the driver

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

RV asks?

So some of you say that the camera stays on at all times, parked or rolling. Some of you say it's turned off when truck is not running. Which one is it? Different camera systems or...?

Possibly. I can only share what I know and have experienced. I was part of several beta-tests and have lived with the "chosen" technology (since June 2014) and none of those tested or what is currently implemented in the trucks I drive remain powered up when the truck was shut down. Most have override power switches that are enabled when the truck is stationary and can be used to manually power off the system. As soon as you move or fire up the engine, it automatically powers up.

A lot of miss-information is fueled by paranoia and basic FUD (fear, uncertainty, and doubt). It was no different several years back when electronic trip monitoring (like Qualcom) became a standard in most of the larger fleets. I also think the post Miss Myoshi wrote is highly relevant to understanding the camera policy for a specific company and also reducing concern for possible miss-use.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Infidel's Comment
member avatar

So some of you say that the camera stays on at all times, parked or rolling. Some of you say it's turned off when truck is not running. Which one is it? Different camera systems or...?

Well theres 2 ways they could keep it on all the time. I think... lol.

1. Store the data locally. Turn the record option on you cellphone camera or laptop and just set it down. Just too see how long it takes to fill up with data storage. Now hook up an external hard drive. And see how long that takes to fill up with day in day out constant operating. It will not take long at all. It could be done but would have to downloaded regularly. Like everyday.

2. Stream the data off site. How much data do you use on your cellphone plan a month? Try setting you tube up on your smart phone up to continuous play. You will run out of data lightning fast. Unless you have unlimited data. Which (unless you kept one of the oldschool plans) is usually expensive. Now think about all those trucks running all those miles everyday. All continuously streaming data. All this assumes a good signal too. Which as we all know doesnt happen.

So in my opinion. Neither of these make any sense. Not cost effective or time effective. But limit that data storage to any time it senses a certain amount of g-forces. Well that makes way more sense. Now ours did not stream. So it had to be downloaded everyday. It was the drivers responsibility.

Big question is in that case. If it has limited storage (which it does). How long till more critical events overwrite previous recordings? Sorry that last part is just me trying to get out of footage of me maybe going over a (non-painted) speed bump to fast...

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Infidel's Comment
member avatar

Sorry... By "on" I meant recording. I can be "on" and not recording.

RebelliousVamp 's Comment
member avatar

Good info. Thanks :)

James P.'s Comment
member avatar

I personally would hope that if a company uses inward facing cameras that they also face outward. I would also want to be notified. It's their equipment to do with as they please, but I'd still like to know if they use inward cameras, or if they plan to install them. Also, I'm all for outward facing dash cams. If I get a company truck that doesn't have one, I'll get my own. It's simply my humble opinion that inward facing cameras should only face the driver's seat, and should only be operational while the truck is moving, or the driver is on-duty. If the truck is shut off, and the driver is off-duty, or in the sleeper, the inward facing camera should turn off, but the outward facing camera can/should remain on.

I remember when I got my CDL-A in 2012 with Central Ref. we had a discussion about inward facing cameras. At one time, perhaps at the start of these being used by other companies, they were able to view the entire inside of the truck and there were incidents of office personnel (of other companies, Central did not use cams) hacking into the cameras to view female drivers in their off time. While I doubt this is much of a concern anymore, and I rather doubt anyone would actually want to peep on me, it still gives me the willies and is the basis for my concern about inward facing cams (I'm all for outward facing).

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Infidel wrote:

1. Store the data locally. Turn the record option on you cellphone camera or laptop and just set it down. Just too see how long it takes to fill up with data storage. Now hook up an external hard drive. And see how long that takes to fill up with day in day out constant operating. It will not take long at all. It could be done but would have to downloaded regularly. Like everyday

With a Flash Drive it's possible, but not practical. You would need to employ thousands of people to review all of the data. The math alone is staggering.

2. Stream the data off site. How much data do you use on your cellphone plan a month? Try setting you tube up on your smart phone up to continuous play. You will run out of data lightning fast. Unless you have unlimited data. Which (unless you kept one of the oldschool plans) is usually expensive. Now think about all those trucks running all those miles everyday. All continuously streaming data. All this assumes a good signal too. Which as we all know doesnt happen

Although the technology exists to accomplish this, there isn't enough of it available and the money it would cost to upgrade networks, bandwidth, data storage and administrative/presentation software would be totally cost prohibitive, through the roof with no real way of getting the return on investment. And the ROI is the key factor with all of these extreme scenarios.

Remember, our employers need to get a return on the camera investment which significantly limits the amount of their initial spend and on-going cost. This is about accident reduction and monitoring safety. That's it.

Big question is in that case. If it has limited storage (which it does). How long till more critical events overwrite previous recordings? Sorry that last part is just me trying to get out of footage of me maybe going over a (non-painted) speed bump to fast...

My favorite question...almost immediately. The local (in your truck) storage refreshes itself every 20-30 seconds depending on how it is programmed. When the camera system is powered on, and you are moving it continuously records and over-writes data constantly in what's called "real-time", only storing a total of 30 seconds at any given time. It uploads to a monitoring facility whenever an event triggers a sensor, 10 seconds before and 10-20 seconds after. They look at it, if it's nothing they discard the video. If it's something it's sent to your driver manager and in many cases they will likely discard it or if it's something requiring a discussion, they will call you in. That's the extent of it.

Since 2014 I have been talked two twice, once for following too close on I-76, and once for a guy cutting me off. They thought I should have slowed down quicker...which brings me to one other point. Never, never flip-somebody-off if they cut you off, if you broke hard or took evasive action, your gesture will be recorded. So that's a gotcha...being from Philly, flipping someone off is how we greet one another.

We good?

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar
I remember when I got my CDL-A in 2012 with Central Ref. we had a discussion about inward facing cameras. At one time, perhaps at the start of these being used by other companies, they were able to view the entire inside of the truck and there were incidents of office personnel (of other companies, Central did not use cams) hacking into the cameras to view female drivers in their off time. While I doubt this is much of a concern anymore, and I rather doubt anyone would actually want to peep on me, it still gives me the willies and is the basis for my concern about inward facing cams (I'm all for outward facing).

These incidences, were they documented, or hearsay? There is a lot of misinformation spread about many things, especially the driver cam, because it directly effects our various expectations of persona privacy. Like Ms Myoshi said, the various company lawyers, went over the issue with a fine tooth comb, about the what ifs, cans, and cannots, etc. If this actually happened, I am sure the female drivers would have filed lawsuits, in which case, it is able to be researched, by the public. And a lot of people seem to forget that use of either privacy curtain blocks the camera, so I doubt that female drivers would be changing clothes, or other personal things, for all the world outside the truck to see, let alone the camera. People see a camera, and automatically assume that it will always be on, always recording, and easily accessible by the big bad bosses. If you look at the specs of any of these systems, they do not have an overly large capacity.

rumors and BS spread like wildfire, and are often treated as fact, because it comes from what is usually a trusted source. But because this is, has been, and will continue to be a hot button issue for the foreseeable future, that trusted source may not be a credible source, because of his or her already established bias.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
James P.'s Comment
member avatar

These incidences, were they documented, or hearsay? There is a lot of misinformation spread about many things, especially the driver cam, because it directly effects our various expectations of persona privacy. Like Ms Myoshi said, the various company lawyers, went over the issue with a fine tooth comb, about the what ifs, cans, and cannots, etc. If this actually happened, I am sure the female drivers would have filed lawsuits, in which case, it is able to be researched, by the public. And a lot of people seem to forget that use of either privacy curtain blocks the camera, so I doubt that female drivers would be changing clothes, or other personal things, for all the world outside the truck to see, let alone the camera. People see a camera, and automatically assume that it will always be on, always recording, and easily accessible by the big bad bosses. If you look at the specs of any of these systems, they do not have an overly large capacity.

rumors and BS spread like wildfire, and are often treated as fact, because it comes from what is usually a trusted source. But because this is, has been, and will continue to be a hot button issue for the foreseeable future, that trusted source may not be a credible source, because of his or her already established bias.

I believe it was actually documented, and of course the drivers filed complaints and lawsuits. I don't recall who, what, where, or when as I wasn't paying that much attention. It is for this reason that I doubt they would use the cameras in this manner (again?) as such actions would end up being counter-productive since they would be facing legal charges of another kind. It's still a bit creepy though, imo.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Creepy is not the word for it! There will always be those who try to skirt around the rules, and there may have been especially in the beginning. I am sure, that noiw, there are big penalties, beyond job loss, for an infraction of this type, now.

The main reason I don't care about a camera in the truck I drive, is, if the camera helps me be a better, and safer driver, then put it in there. As far as my privacy goes, I have been in jail, where guards can watch me pee, and poop, on camera. And so could 11 other guys, since the toilet was out in the open. Yes, I like my privacy, but after that experience, nothing really bothers me, in that area of my life. That was over 10 years ago.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Infidel's Comment
member avatar

Infidel wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

1. Store the data locally. Turn the record option on you cellphone camera or laptop and just set it down. Just too see how long it takes to fill up with data storage. Now hook up an external hard drive. And see how long that takes to fill up with day in day out constant operating. It will not take long at all. It could be done but would have to downloaded regularly. Like everyday

double-quotes-end.png

With a Flash Drive it's possible, but not practical. You would need to employ thousands of people to review all of the data. The math alone is staggering.

double-quotes-start.png

2. Stream the data off site. How much data do you use on your cellphone plan a month? Try setting you tube up on your smart phone up to continuous play. You will run out of data lightning fast. Unless you have unlimited data. Which (unless you kept one of the oldschool plans) is usually expensive. Now think about all those trucks running all those miles everyday. All continuously streaming data. All this assumes a good signal too. Which as we all know doesnt happen

double-quotes-end.png

Although the technology exists to accomplish this, there isn't enough of it available and the money it would cost to upgrade networks, bandwidth, data storage and administrative/presentation software would be totally cost prohibitive, through the roof with no real way of getting the return on investment. And the ROI is the key factor with all of these extreme scenarios.

Remember, our employers need to get a return on the camera investment which significantly limits the amount of their initial spend and on-going cost. This is about accident reduction and monitoring safety. That's it.

double-quotes-start.png

Big question is in that case. If it has limited storage (which it does). How long till more critical events overwrite previous recordings? Sorry that last part is just me trying to get out of footage of me maybe going over a (non-painted) speed bump to fast...

double-quotes-end.png

My favorite question...almost immediately. The local (in your truck) storage refreshes itself every 20-30 seconds depending on how it is programmed. When the camera system is powered on, and you are moving it continuously records and over-writes data constantly in what's called "real-time", only storing a total of 30 seconds at any given time. It uploads to a monitoring facility whenever an event triggers a sensor, 10 seconds before and 10-20 seconds after. They look at it, if it's nothing they discard the video. If it's something it's sent to your driver manager and in many cases they will likely discard it or if it's something requiring a discussion, they will call you in. That's the extent of it.

Since 2014 I have been talked two twice, once for following too close on I-76, and once for a guy cutting me off. They thought I should have slowed down quicker...which brings me to one other point. Never, never flip-somebody-off if they cut you off, if you broke hard or took evasive action, your gesture will be recorded. So that's a gotcha...being from Philly, flipping someone off is how we greet one another.

We good?

Yeah you did a more formal explanation than what I was trying to get across. I was trying to put it in a way everyone could understand. By taking it too a more personal level. But I wouldn't go so far as to agree with flash drives. I mean I dont know how much data is maximum for a flash drive before we have stop calling it a flash drive. For the amount data you would need to store you would be better to go with external hard drives. I mean if you are talking about saving every second of every day, even of just on duty time. Lets say you make it to a terminal every 2 weeks (just for arguments sake)? Thats a metric butt ton of data. And that costs money.

And I wasnt talking about length of time it holds on to non-critical events. Just the recorded events. With ours it was 20 seconds. 10 seconds before the event and 10 seconds after. Now with my bus. This was years ago. My bus never uploaded too a remote location on its own. Ever. You had to manually take the cord and plug it into a jack and it would download the days events. You almost never got the same bus twice. And they didnt monitor whether you did or didnt download it. Soooo......... just sayin.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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