FedEx Road Driver Apprentice (LTL Linehaul)

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G-Rod's Comment
member avatar

So I think I made it. To anyone who's seen my previous post about trying to get into driving. It's been about approx. 6 months since I've started trying. I started working part-time on the dock at FedEx in order to get my foot in the door. I got my CDL permit so that I was ready when an apprentice spot opened up. Well about 2 weeks ago it was time. Road Driver Apprentice position available. As soon as I seen it I went to my manager and told him I wanted to apply. He walked me through the process to do it internally on FedEx servers in order to kind of put me toward the top of the list. Well I'm in the process, filling out papers, and going in a couple days to do a drug test and DOT physical. Once I pass those, I should get my conditional offer. Then I have to conquer the CDL license itself. Which is kind of exciting and scary at the same time.

So far, I'm really enjoying FedEx. They seem to have a good company culture. Especially compared to my current job. One of the best parts is, THEY PROMOTE FROM WITHIN first. And I'm seeing that first hand. In 6 mos, I've already had increased hours, a raise, and a chance at an apprenticeship!

The only con to starting at road driver is, they do require dock work until seniority is built, which I've been doing already, so shouldn't mind too much. Starting off I'd be doing what they call a shuttle run which is only driving from my terminal to roughly 40 miles away to a larger terminal, then working their dock for about 5-6 hours, then driving back. Gotta start some where. I'm just happy to have an opportunity to make a lot more money than I am now.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Jared, GREAT ATTITUDE. You will do just fine in this world. Too many people these days seem to want something for nothing. Working your A$$ off is how you can make big things happen. Trust me, the higher ups in any company will recognize go getters like you and move you up the Company Ladder. The lazy a$$es will be stuck on the docks forever. Congratulations

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

So I think I made it. To anyone who's seen my previous post about trying to get into driving. It's been about approx. 6 months since I've started trying. I started working part-time on the dock at FedEx in order to get my foot in the door. I got my CDL permit so that I was ready when an apprentice spot opened up. Well about 2 weeks ago it was time. Road Driver Apprentice position available. As soon as I seen it I went to my manager and told him I wanted to apply. He walked me through the process to do it internally on FedEx servers in order to kind of put me toward the top of the list. Well I'm in the process, filling out papers, and going in a couple days to do a drug test and DOT physical. Once I pass those, I should get my conditional offer. Then I have to conquer the CDL license itself. Which is kind of exciting and scary at the same time.

So far, I'm really enjoying FedEx. They seem to have a good company culture. Especially compared to my current job. One of the best parts is, THEY PROMOTE FROM WITHIN first. And I'm seeing that first hand. In 6 mos, I've already had increased hours, a raise, and a chance at an apprenticeship!

The only con to starting at road driver is, they do require dock work until seniority is built, which I've been doing already, so shouldn't mind too much. Starting off I'd be doing what they call a shuttle run which is only driving from my terminal to roughly 40 miles away to a larger terminal, then working their dock for about 5-6 hours, then driving back. Gotta start some where. I'm just happy to have an opportunity to make a lot more money than I am now.

That's awesome man, congrats!! Keep us updated. I interviewed with FedEx once for a local courier position and really liked them. They had to rescind their offer because of a ticket I got while I was going through the hiring process, but I've always kept them in mind and may eventually reapply for a cdl position. So I'm really interested in hearing how things go for you!

As always, good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Hey Jared, good deal man!

I'll be looking forward to officially welcoming you to the linehaul brotherhood. You'll have yourself one of the best-paying, easiest trucking jobs on the planet. Drops and hooks, no customers, no truck stops, home a few times a week if not every day. Just remember that when you have a long day or are tired from driving at night. Linehaul is a lifestyle in and of itself, just like OTR. I love it. Let me know if there's ever any way I can help.

I'm assuming you'll be pulling doubles then?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

G-Rod's Comment
member avatar

Thanks guys. Yeah should eventually be doubles , however, starting out, I believe it will just be a pup for a little while. Another thing I think is good about FedEx is it seems like they take the time to actually train people. They invest in the people they hire. Even when I was hired for a part time dock position, I did 6-7 days of just computer training......watching videos, taking quiz, ect. Then once making it to the dock, another 12-13 days with a mentor walking me through their process and procedures. So I'm pretty confident they'll put a good amount of time into me as a driver.

And another thing about FedEx, usually when applying for jobs they say tip toe around salary expectations and stuff. Don't act like the money is all you care about. Pshhhh, here I had my current dock boss, and the road manager I was applying to throwing salary info at me. He said he believes his lowest guy is making right around $60K/year (starting out). He said after 3-4 years more like $80K/year. And he said his top seniority guy does nothing but one run 600 miles a day (300 each way) mon-fri and is dragging down $120K-$130K!! That's lawyer and doctor money! You get a half hour wage for fueling, and half hour for hooking sets, and half hour for breaking sets.

So although 6 string loves OD, and I've heard multiple other drivers say great things about OD, FedEx doesn't seem too bad so far. And they are helping me get started, or giving me a CHANCE, and that's all I've really been looking for, an opportunity. So I'm gonna do my best to capitalize on it.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Terminal Rat ( aka...J's Comment
member avatar

Congratulations Jared!

JJ

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

So although 6 string loves OD, and I've heard multiple other drivers say great things about OD, FedEx doesn't seem too bad so far. And they are helping me get started, or giving me a CHANCE, and that's all I've really been looking for, an opportunity. So I'm gonna do my best to capitalize on it.

Hey Jared, Fed Ex is a great place to work!

...He said he believes his lowest guy is making right around $60K/year (starting out). He said after 3-4 years more like $80K/year. And he said his top seniority guy does nothing but one run 600 miles a day (300 each way) mon-fri and is dragging down $120K-$130K!! That's lawyer and doctor money! You get a half hour wage for fueling, and half hour for hooking sets, and half hour for breaking sets.

60k-80k is what you'll find as average linehaul income, so that sounds about right. But I think he's embellishing just a tad for that dude making 120-130k on a 600 mile run. I have an idea of what Fed Ex Freight is paying their linehaul guys, and I think that it's probably closer to 100k - which is still awesome!!!!

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Stevo VWbusman's Comment
member avatar

Like UPS lol my middle bro been with em 32+ years...Doing last half on semi's , 60 hours a week. Has 9+ weeks vacation/personal days @ $32+ hour. Started out unloading trailers 4 years, til commercial package route opened up he took. 14 years that then big trucks. Family friend also does same 30+ years, he got job there........ He Couldn't hook a brother up though, I wanted in as mechanic, whatever haha......dad's buddy was original UPS guy like #7th hired in 1969-70, did 40+ years til he retired.....Now hear it takes 8 years P/T unloading to get on routes!

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

.....Now hear it takes 8 years P/T unloading to get on routes!

That sounds more like UPS Ground and those drivers that drive the box trucks. Typically, you have to work your way up from the packaging line to a driver position. UPS Ground is different from UPSF (UPS Freight).

UPS Freight will hire road drivers without having to work the dock or packaging.

But it all depends on the particular hub or terminal. Different opportunities for different locations. In my area, you can apply for a tractor trailer position with UPS Freight and start as a road driver.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Rod's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, once I did the math myself, that does seem a little embellished. I think top scale is around $0.64/mile right now.

I still have gotten the official word, but did the drug test and DOT physical last Friday. And I'm supposed to be getting some hostler time tonight. Not sure if they are just going have me drive a hostler buggy around the yard or what exactly, but it's another step in the right direction.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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