Me And My Big Mouth! (How To Start A Fight At A Terminal)

Topic 15060 | Page 3

Page 3 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Sambo's Comment
member avatar

Hey Burkley, grats on the Knight position. I just got the approval from my recruiter to start my orientation. Just waiting out the notice I gave at my current job. Depending on how quickly Knight needs me will determine how much notice this company will get.

Curious to know how you like it? I will be running reefer , super regional , out of Dallas, TX. Have you been able to get consistent miles? Has the pay been ok, or do you find it lacking?

This is one thing I am concerned about. I currently work in the oilfield. Last year I made just over $72,000, but since the downturn in the oil market, they reduced our pay by about $7000, so i'll probably be on track to make closer to $65k to $70k this year. Now I am looking into making a change into the trucking industry, and I know my pay will drop to around the $50k mark, however, I plan on getting out of my apartment, so that will save on rent, electricity, water, cable, internet, not to mention i'll end up spending less on the road that I would here at home, I hope, in addition to this, I won't be having to buy gas for my pickup. I'm hoping that with all of the savings, i'll end up breaking even.

I'm hoping that after taxes, insurance, and 401k, that i'll be able to bring home between $650 and $700 per week. Is this doable or will I be looking at less than that?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OldRookie's Comment
member avatar

I'm hoping that after taxes, insurance, and 401k, that i'll be able to bring home between $650 and $700 per week. Is this doable or will I be looking at less than that?

For me to NET $700 (after taxes, insurances and contributing 6% of my GROSS to my 401K)... I need to GROSS about $1,100. To GROSS around $1,100 (at .39 per mile)... I need about 2,800 miles.

There is a Gross Up Calculator at Gross Up Calculator that you can use to do "what ifs." Just pick your State, enter your number of exemptions and pre-tax deductions for insurance and 401K.

Guzinta's Comment
member avatar

I suppose it's really difficult to help someone when they have their head so firmly planted in their butt! OS, you are, for sure, a "super trucker" for your attempt to help this (not so) rare specimen. Good for you for not giving up on people!

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I agree with the sentiment that others have given - please do not let it deter you in the least from wanting to help people the way you do! It's truly a gift that you and the others that are out there running hard everyday still go out of your way to help others the way you do. I'm sure since the incident you've thought of a thousand things you could have said at the time like, "Sorry man. Your paychecks are so much smaller than mine I was feeling bad for ya. Thought I could teach you how a real pro does it but now I can see you aren't capable of it anyhow."

But ya know what? You took one for the team because your story reinforces what we tell people all the time - you'll find far more happiness and success in this career if you do everything with a great attitude. Now I've always known that statement falls on deaf ears a lot. "Have a great attitude? What the h*ll kind of corny, rah-rah advice is that? Does he think he's teaching middle school or something?"

But I'll tell you what kind of advice it is - it's the kind that's going to put more money in your wallet, get you home on time, get you better runs, keep you moving when others are sitting, and lead to opportunities that other drivers will never be given. Here's why:

You see, the trucker stereotype of the loud-mouth, unprofessional, obnoxious jerk is very real. In fact, turn on channel 19 on the CB or sit in on the conversations at the company terminals or truck stops and you'll not only agree, but you'll be appalled that it's as rampant as it is. In fact, it's commonplace for truckers to walk into a customer's office smelling like a dumpster, looking like a bum off the street, and cussing everyone out when he doesn't get taken care of right away.

Would that type of behavior be tolerated in any professional environment? Of course not! Imagine someone walking into an office environment looking, acting, and smelling like that. They'd be fired on the spot! Instantly! No questions asked. And everyone that witnessed it would be appalled. And yet it's tolerated by these same professionals when truckers do it. Why? For the same reason that peeing on someone's mailbox is tolerated when a dog does it - because people don't expect anything better from a dog.

Truckers have such a low standing in our society that even the people running trucking companies tolerate smelly, ignorant, foul-mouthed jerks because they simply don't expect anything better from us. We're truckers - that's just what we're like. We're considered a lower class of people.

So as a trucker, if you decide to look, talk, and act like a true professional out there you really do stand out in the crowd. The customers are delighted, dispatchers will love you, and even the waitresses at the truck stops will surely appreciate it. In fact, you will find that often times:

  • You'll be loaded or unloaded ahead of other drivers even though they arrived first
  • You'll be given plenty of freight while other drivers are fighting for the leftover scraps
  • You'll be given special favors from time to time like really awesome runs or an extra day or two at home that others won't get
  • You'll be given special consideration by management anytime you run into problems you'd like to discuss with them

......and the list goes on and on. The waitresses will take better care of you, the friendlier drivers out there will make for enjoyable company, and everyone you come across will certainly respond in a friendlier way.

But we're all doing this to make money and I'm telling you that you'll make more money and have a lot more fun out there if you'll maintain the standards of a true professional and treat others with kindness and respect. That is a fact. It won't happen every single time with every person you come across, but overall it certainly will happen.

Old School you are appreciated far beyond what words can convey because you've helped many thousands of people understand what it means to be a true professional out there. And now those people are out there, or preparing to head out there, and their lives and careers are so much better off because of your guidance. Sure, every once in a while you'll run into a jerk that doesn't get it and never will. But part of what makes a person a truly great mentor with great character is that they don't let those people deter them from their mission to help others find more happiness and success in their lives and their careers. Keep doing what you're doing and don't change a thing. We would all lose in a big way if you stopped being you and doing what you do.

smile.gif

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Gator's Comment
member avatar

rofl-2.gif More loads for me!

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

They may not appreciate you, but we do old school. You have taught me a lot as well as Brett and others. By following yalls advice I have been doing well. I try my best to have a good attitude and it has got me loaded early quite often. I say let the whiners whine, we don't have time for it because we are actually driving! rofl-3.gif

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Burkley B.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Burkley, grats on the Knight position. I just got the approval from my recruiter to start my orientation. Just waiting out the notice I gave at my current job. Depending on how quickly Knight needs me will determine how much notice this company will get.

Curious to know how you like it? I will be running reefer , super regional , out of Dallas, TX. Have you been able to get consistent miles? Has the pay been ok, or do you find it lacking?

This is one thing I am concerned about. I currently work in the oilfield. Last year I made just over $72,000, but since the downturn in the oil market, they reduced our pay by about $7000, so i'll probably be on track to make closer to $65k to $70k this year. Now I am looking into making a change into the trucking industry, and I know my pay will drop to around the $50k mark, however, I plan on getting out of my apartment, so that will save on rent, electricity, water, cable, internet, not to mention i'll end up spending less on the road that I would here at home, I hope, in addition to this, I won't be having to buy gas for my pickup. I'm hoping that with all of the savings, i'll end up breaking even.

I'm hoping that after taxes, insurance, and 401k, that i'll be able to bring home between $650 and $700 per week. Is this doable or will I be looking at less than that?

I'm really liking it so far. I'm at the Katy terminal right now but I'm out of Columbus Oh. It seems like they will give you all the miles you can handle. Everyone is really easy to talk to. Heads up though this zonar thing is kinda funky.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

But thw thing is that you do t have to do 600 per day to make money. 7 x 400 = 2800 moles per week. Not stressing... taking time for breaks showers sleep. Wtf is this guy's problem?

I guess I never felt the need for pushing for payday either. At prime we can take a pay advance for a couple hundred dollars. It comes out the next week... so if I needed $ I'd have it and it would be covered by thw long run that didn't make the payday cutoff

Diver Driver's Comment
member avatar

But thw thing is that you do t have to do 600 per day to make money. 7 x 400 = 2800 moles per week. Not stressing... taking time for breaks showers sleep. Wtf is this guy's problem?

I guess I never felt the need for pushing for payday either. At prime we can take a pay advance for a couple hundred dollars. It comes out the next week... so if I needed $ I'd have it and it would be covered by thw long run that didn't make the payday cutoff

Exactly !!! "This week might be light, due to the run extending over the cut off date, but damn, next week is gonna be huge since I now have a week and some extra. .."

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Omg I thought of this post today. Yesterday I was 120 miles from the terminal and asked the weekend dispatch if I could come in to get supplies fuel and washout. I wanted some things from the company store as well as wiper fluids trip sheets and more.

They said "definitely get a washout" ... uh.. yeah but WHERE was the point. I said screw it and found a BB then parked.

Night dispatch tried to send me a 1700 mile load I couldn't do with my hours. Then my FM comes in at 0700 and gives me a load that picks up in springfield at 0900. They had to change the Appt time for me to make it. Thw load is 1500 miles an I still can't finish it.. but I'll get a big chunk of it.

The kicker.... a bunch of prime drivers are on FB griping about how they can't get loads out of there. I got 2 loads in 4 hours while I was on break....of more than 1200 miles... hmmmm. I get there and 3 are sitting in the cafe bashing dispatch about not giving them loads... and they were company drivers not lease. They said only the "favorites" get loads.

Guess I'm a favorite.... wonder how I did that.... oh yeah.. I remember I freaking show up on time lol

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Page 3 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Advice For New Truck Drivers Dealing With The Boss Dispatcher Issues Life On The Road Trucking Humor Trucking Industry Concerns
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More