A Or B? What Sections?

Topic 15528 | Page 1

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Art A.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello, how are you doing? I want to ask somethings about the cdl classes just to be clear as I have heard conflicting things when I walked up to the driver's side of trucks. Also I want to ask many questions and hope it's not too much and please forgive the mess. Also I currently reside in NYC. What will I be able to drive with a class B? I wanted to set out for this one initially as I was told it's the less expensive one. I spoke with a driver hauling sand in a straight truck and he told me with a class B I would be doing what he is doing.

How much more cost is the A class? Is it harder. To find work with the B?

Also I don't want to sleep in the truck. One of the driver's was very nice, showed me how to do an inspection of an truck and trailer ( he had a bed inside ). I want something like regular hours. However he told me with a class B, you can only drive a cab, limo.

Also for the NYC ( don't know if it's the same thing as NYS) CDL permit - what sections do I need to study for the NYC written test? ( one of the driver's told me inspection and airbrakes, particular sections and not the entire manual ).

Please excuse the mess and thank you for your time.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Are you over 21? Start here

Also look at this Company-Sponsored Training Programs. Hope that helps. I believe with a class B you can drive buses.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Art asked:

I want to ask somethings about the cdl classes just to be clear as I have heard conflicting things when I walked up to the driver's side of trucks.

Art,...there is a lot of false and negatively embellished information exchanged within the truck driver community. I am not sure what exactly you heard, but it all comes down to what you want in your career. Big Scott sent you some really good information that can assist with building a good base of information and also studying for your Class A or B permit.

With a Class B you can drive a straight truck, but not a tractor trailer. Most of the time we advise a prospective student to train for the CDL A. With an A and the schooling behind it, you have a higher earning potential and far greater job opportunities. The Class A schooling is more extensive. Any company willing to hire you once you have your license, will continue road training for another 4-6 weeks.

You have several options to consider: Company-Sponsored Training Programs , Private Truck Driving School Listings and possibly a truck driver community college course.

This might help you make the right choice:

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Art A.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you for the info. The emails I get from this website time to time are really helpful. For the cdl test. Do you get a different truck to drive. Like a truck / trailer for A and a bus for B? Also if I want to drive a dump truck. Do they teach you how to use it? I mean the basket part ( don't think it's actually called that ). Also the back part of the trailer. Does the metal platform raise itself or you have to manually lift it?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Art A.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry for the doable post. I forgot to ask. Do I need to get a ez pass for trucks? Or the companies give that to you or have their own in the truck? Because when I was in a uhaul the worker at one of the ez pass booths told me I can't use my normal ez pass and that it would be a fine if he was in a crappy mood.

Matt H.'s Comment
member avatar
Do you get a different truck to drive. Like a truck / trailer for A and a bus for B?

To be clear, if you get a CDL A, you do not need to do a separate written or skills test for a CDL B. You still need endorsements if you want to drive something that requires endorsements, but the ability to drive Class B vehicles is awarded automatically when you get a Class A CDL. If you can pass the test to drive a 70' long combination vehicle , the assumption is that you will be able to handle a straight truck that isn't even half that length.

You will need to check with whoever you are testing with. Some testers will rent you what you need as an addition to your testing fee, some will rent what you need included in your testing fee, and some will require you provide the vehicle which means getting a vehicle and then having someone licensed to drive it bring the vehicle to the testing site.

For a Class A, you will need to test in a Tractor/Trailer. For a B, you have some options but the most common would be just a normal straight truck. You would not need to test in a Bus unless you are specifically going for a Passenger endorsement. School Bus is the same, where you would use that to test if you were trying to get a School Bus endorsement, but you must already have a Passenger endorsement before you can get a School Bus endorsement.

CDL permit - what sections do I need to study for the NYC written test?

Studying using the High Road Training Program here on TT, at a minimum you will want to study General Knowledge and Air Brakes for a Class B. You might come across some questions that weren't covered, but not enough to fail you if you really know what you did study. Combination Vehicles would be required also if you wanted to get a Class A. Everything else would be optional and you will want to consider what your specific goals are to figure out what you need to study.

Beyond the written test for your CLP , make sure you study Pre-Trip Inspection for the Skills Test to get your full CDL. See if the place you plan to do your skills test at offers a reasonably priced training specifically for the Pre-Trip Inspection test that they will be giving you. Don't do it right before testing because there it a lot of info to absorb. Make sure you also get a chance to practice the Pre-Trip Inspection on the specific vehicle you will be doing your test in. If you fail a Pre-Trip Inspection, you fail it all. In the first 10 minutes, you can auto-fail on something and there goes hundreds of dollars in testing fees and test vehicle fees.

With the Class B written tests for your CLP requiring General Knowledge and Air Brakes already, Combination Vehicles does not take that long to study for and the test doesn't take long. Even if you are planning right now to only get a Class B CDL, you can take the Combination Vehicles test with the others and be eligible to test for Class A if you change your mind, without having to deal with the DMV an extra time. You won't be forced into doing a skills test for a Class A just because you took the written test to allow you to take it. It just gives you the option when the time comes to go A instead of B.

Also if I want to drive a dump truck. Do they teach you how to use it?

That is easily taught by a company that would hire you to use a dump truck. You could even just self-learn with a little time on YouTube. There isn't much to the actual operation of a dump truck. The part you want to be sure you are aware of though is how top heavy they can be, which creates a big danger if you aren't careful in turns or how you drive on uneven ground (common on construction sites and quarries).

I think it is worth noting that if you are considering going the dump truck route, you might want to check with local construction and excavation companies. If you have a solid work history and a clean criminal/driving background, and arrive with your CLP, they may be willing to cover the cost of getting you trained and tested for your full CDL upgrade.

How much more cost is the A class? Is it harder. To find work with the B?

From my own recent experience, if you want to go Class A, plan on going to some sort of school. It does not matter if you aren't looking to go over the road or anything like that. I don't recommend it just because it makes you hirable. I recommend it because you will have a very hard time passing the skills test without having quite a bit of time in a Tractor/Trailer. Even if you pick it up quick, you want some expert advice while you are practicing to make sure you won't be wasting the money you end up spending on testing.

Difficulty in finding work will depend on your history and what the companies in your area are looking for. Class A definitely opens up more options for you, but there could be plenty of Class B work available in your area. Especially being in a large city (you mentioned being in NYC?), there will be tons and tons of straight trucks out there doing local deliveries, which should mean there are some jobs local for you. The question will be how many jobs are sitting open and that is something you will need to figure out for your specific area by checking the classifieds online and in the local publications. You might also want to check with job placement companies to see how in-demand you might be.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Matt H.'s Comment
member avatar

Ran out of characters there, so here goes the last bit.

Do I need to get a ez pass for trucks? Or the companies give that to you or have their own in the truck?

Wait and find out from whatever company ends up hiring you.

Art A.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Thank you.

So what ever happened? I see this was from a year ago. Did you do it?

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