Swift In Cab Camera

Topic 15613 | Page 4

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ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

I'm only going to add one comment here. This is a hot button topic for me as I 100% support cameras in trucks, both forward and driver facing cameras.

I set off my cameras on a pretty frequent basis. Hard braking, a hard couple to a trailer, even an extremely bumpy drop yard.

BUT!! I have earned a DriveCam TOP PERFORMER award for the last 9 weeks straight. This means no risky or coachable behavior or speeding events in the last 7 days. This is a two-part award. First, DriveCam reviews my camera clips and decides whether to forward them to TransAm, and second, TransAm sees any clips that MAY (not saying they have seen any of them) have been forwarded and safety reviews them.

I have my husband with me on the truck, so it records me having conversations, taking a drink of coffee or soda, or smoking a cigarette.

I have never once been called by safety or brought into the terminal for a camera event.

Cameras are not the devil that everyone makes them out to be, nor are they an "invasion of privacy" that everyone seems to think they are.

As far as the poster who mentioned the remote triggered cameras, he was specifically mentioning them in relation to FUEL hauling. If anyone should be MORE accountable drivers, it's those who are hauling thousands of gallons of fuel!!! Um, explosive bomb threat anyone??

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Paul J.'s Comment
member avatar

Cameras are not the devil that everyone makes them out to be, nor are they an "invasion of privacy" that everyone seems to think they are.

I think everyone here accepts them to the extent that they are used to monitor job performance. They become an invasion of privacy when they remain active while facing a driver who is off duty and in his living space. Are you really okay with the possibility of the camera uploading a clip of you and your husband engaged in a very private conversation or a moment of intimacy?

miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

The camera faces the driver's seat. If you are sitting there, you have no reasonable expectation of privacy. If you want privacy, go into the sleeper berth. The camera does not face there. It's a pretty simple concept.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

THATS WHY THEY MAKE CURTAINS!!!!

ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

The camera faces the driver's seat. If you are sitting there, you have no reasonable expectation of privacy. If you want privacy, go into the sleeper berth. The camera does not face there. It's a pretty simple concept.

Ours face the entire cab area. They've had cases where people had an unapproved pet on board, set off their camera and were forced to get the pet off the truck.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Paul asks

Are you really okay with the possibility of the camera uploading a clip of you and your husband engaged in a very private conversation or a moment of intimacy?

Unless you do not want to accept everyone else's statements that the camera does not record unless stimulated, you have a problem. Even if you ignore the two others who have said Swift policy is that you can cover the inside lens when you're off duty or on sleeper.

The only time the camera may go off at an inappropriate time is when another truck crashes into yours when it's already rockin'. And I'll bet that coincidence won't happen.

ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

And trust me, DriveCam and the other companies have seen it all. Just like doctors, if it can be done in a truck, I guarantee you they have seen it.

Cover the dang thing when you are off duty if you are so concerned about it. It's 100% LEGAL to do so. Just not while the truck is in motion

miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

The camera faces the driver's seat. If you are sitting there, you have no reasonable expectation of privacy. If you want privacy, go into the sleeper berth. The camera does not face there. It's a pretty simple concept.

double-quotes-end.png

Ours face the entire cab area. They've had cases where people had an unapproved pet on board, set off their camera and were forced to get the pet off the truck.

Fair enough, though my point still stands. If you want privacy go in the sleeper lol. The cab is considered your work area.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

The camera faces the driver's seat. If you are sitting there, you have no reasonable expectation of privacy. If you want privacy, go into the sleeper berth. The camera does not face there. It's a pretty simple concept.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Ours face the entire cab area. They've had cases where people had an unapproved pet on board, set off their camera and were forced to get the pet off the truck.

double-quotes-end.png

Fair enough, though my point still stands. If you want privacy go in the sleeper lol. The cab is considered your work area.

Agreed. Sleeper is your home. Close the curtains and forget the thing is there.

This whole argument to me raises one simple question every time it comes up.

What do you have to hide?? If it's simply a "privacy" issue, cover the camera with curtains or a hat or whatever, case closed.

But people keep going on about it which leads to the assumption that there is something more going on.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Paul J.'s Comment
member avatar

Paul asks

double-quotes-start.png

Are you really okay with the possibility of the camera uploading a clip of you and your husband engaged in a very private conversation or a moment of intimacy?

double-quotes-end.png

Unless you do not want to accept everyone else's statements that the camera does not record unless stimulated, you have a problem. Even if you ignore the two others who have said Swift policy is that you can cover the inside lens when you're off duty or on sleeper.

The only time the camera may go off at an inappropriate time is when another truck crashes into yours when it's already rockin'. And I'll bet that coincidence won't happen.

I know full well how the camera can be triggered. I said the possibility of the camera recording a private moment. Pay attention.

So, you all seem to be okay with the very real possibility of such a moment or conversation being recorded and uploaded (either manually, or if your truck is bumped at an inopportune moment). Is there nothing you consider private when living in your truck? When you go in a dressing room of a store, or the bathroom of a restaurant, or a locker room in a gym, or stay in a hotel, do you expect that your conversations and actions not be recorded and viewed or listened to by others?

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