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What does Prime check before approving you for orientation?

Topic 15834 | Page 5

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Rainy D.'s Comment
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Yeah and some treated it like a competition which it isn't. You don't need to be the best on the SIMs, you don't need to pass the written first. You don't even need to pass any of the tests on the first try. One of the instructors told me guys like that are the bones they expect to try to pass or "out do" a vehicle on the road making them more or a risk.

There were like five guys in my class who apparently just go from orientation to orientation for free hotel and meals....totally homeless.

I personally think they do a good job weeding people out for the most part. But...people lingering in the hall and in the smoke area could be anyone. Trainers looking for students...instructors judging actions and attitudes.

To me it was just "act like a normal civilized human being" but you'd be surprised at the way some people act lol

Brett Aquila's Comment
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So assuming acting in a professional manner etc. I am retiring from restaurant management to do this. I would assume I should be OK at orientation?

At that point it will all come down to the background checks, the DOT physical, and the drug screen. Then you'll have to pass your permit test (pretty easy). Then it will come down to whether or not you learn the driving and backing skills at a reasonable rate. Then it will come down to whether or not you can handle the challenges you'll face out on the road with your trainer. Then it will come down to whether or not you can handle life on the road as a solo driver.

In other words, it never ends in trucking. There really is no "finish line" where you reach a certain point and you can just sit back, relax, and enjoy the job. There are always a ton of obstacles to overcome and challenges to face, day in and day out. And the most difficult challenges often have nothing to do with driving. They involve things like separation from home and family, erratic sleep patterns, constanting changing weather, heavy traffic, extended periods of solitude, and other lifestyle factors that come with the territory.

I'm telling you all this just to make sure you have the proper expectations going into this. I don't want you (or anyone reading this) to think you just have to tough it out for a little while or just get to a certain point and then it all gets easier. So prepare yourself mentally for a challenging lifestyle, not just a challenging training period or testing period or rookie year. It never gets easy.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Brian E.'s Comment
member avatar

I am totally ready for the change. I want to retire from trucking in 25 years. Have been researching the life style for 3 years

double-quotes-start.png

So assuming acting in a professional manner etc. I am retiring from restaurant management to do this. I would assume I should be OK at orientation?

double-quotes-end.png

At that point it will all come down to the background checks, the DOT physical, and the drug screen. Then you'll have to pass your permit test (pretty easy). Then it will come down to whether or not you learn the driving and backing skills at a reasonable rate. Then it will come down to whether or not you can handle the challenges you'll face out on the road with your trainer. Then it will come down to whether or not you can handle life on the road as a solo driver.

In other words, it never ends in trucking. There really is no "finish line" where you reach a certain point and you can just sit back, relax, and enjoy the job. There are always a ton of obstacles to overcome and challenges to face, day in and day out. And the most difficult challenges often have nothing to do with driving. They involve things like separation from home and family, erratic sleep patterns, constanting changing weather, heavy traffic, extended periods of solitude, and other lifestyle factors that come with the territory.

I'm telling you all this just to make sure you have the proper expectations going into this. I don't want you (or anyone reading this) to think you just have to tough it out for a little while or just get to a certain point and then it all gets easier. So prepare yourself mentally for a challenging lifestyle, not just a challenging training period or testing period or rookie year. It never gets easy.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I am totally ready for the change. I want to retire from trucking in 25 years. Have been researching the lifestyle for 3 years

Awesome! Well just take it a day at a time.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I think everything has pretty much been said here. So I can only reinforce what's been said with my own personal experience, and I'll repeat what I said in a similar post.

Brian, along with your background, Prime will be looking at YOU to see if you're of the right material they want. They may forgive past transgressions if they feel you have potential.

I'm nearing my 3rd week here in Springfield, and I've seen some real shady looking characters with bad attitudes come.......... and go.

Your honesty and attitude will go a long way towards your success. I told you my background, and they still seem to love me in spite of it. Positive, professional attitude.

I understand your concern with quitting your job and all. I was in the same boat. I know you are looking for a definitive answer to your "Will they take me?" question, but you aren't gonna get it, I'm afraid. We can't answer that.

If you disclosed everything and your recruiter still said you are ok, then chances are the rest is on you. Show up with a positive, professional MANNER and APPEARANCE, and you should have it in the bag.

Good luck and please keep us posted.

Brian E.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank You I will keep you all posted and am looking forward to be part of prime

I think everything has pretty much been said here. So I can only reinforce what's been said with my own personal experience, and I'll repeat what I said in a similar post.

Brian, along with your background, Prime will be looking at YOU to see if you're of the right material they want. They may forgive past transgressions if they feel you have potential.

I'm nearing my 3rd week here in Springfield, and I've seen some real shady looking characters with bad attitudes come.......... and go.

Your honesty and attitude will go a long way towards your success. I told you my background, and they still seem to love me in spite of it. Positive, professional attitude.

I understand your concern with quitting your job and all. I was in the same boat. I know you are looking for a definitive answer to your "Will they take me?" question, but you aren't gonna get it, I'm afraid. We can't answer that.

If you disclosed everything and your recruiter still said you are ok, then chances are the rest is on you. Show up with a positive, professional MANNER and APPEARANCE, and you should have it in the bag.

Good luck and please keep us posted.

Kat's Comment
member avatar

At Prime, they tell you that the orientation and then the training period are one big, long interview. Always be professional, no matter what you are doing or who you are talking to. It goes a long way in proving that you can interact with customers in a respectful, professional way. I had idiots in my orientation group AND CDL training phase that got sent home for the dumbest things.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

And remember you are not hired until you have the CDL...so screaming at your trainer or cursing or threatening him is not a good idea lol

Its not a good idea AFTER hiring..but terrible before

Seen this too. Lol

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brian E.'s Comment
member avatar

Good news with disclosure I am cleared for orientation

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Good deal Brian, glad to hear it!

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