Tips, Tricks, And Techniques For Rookie Drivers

Topic 16099 | Page 4

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Rob S.'s Comment
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If you do nothing else for a post trip, check your tires. I was spent the night on a flat that could have been ready to roll in the morning. Instead, I was tired and just crawled in the bunk. Saw it in the morning and had to wait a couple hours on the repair.

Rainy D.'s Comment
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Glad hand seals come in 2 types....one lip and double lip. I bought the singles and they just fell out.

The also come in rubber or plastic which can differ on life expectancy

Kurt G.'s Comment
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If you do nothing else for a post trip, check your tires. I was spent the night on a flat that could have been ready to roll in the morning. Instead, I was tired and just crawled in the bunk. Saw it in the morning and had to wait a couple hours on the repair.

That's a good one. That saved me twice. It's nice to wake up at midnight and find that the tire guy just finished changing your flat trailer tire.

Glad hand seals come in 2 types....one lip and double lip. I bought the singles and they just fell out.

The also come in rubber or plastic which can differ on life expectancy

I didn't know that. Never had to replace one yet.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Errol V.'s Comment
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I made a "flag" from a paper clip and some reflective tape. I hang it above the steering wheel so that I can't drive while it's there. I do this when I'm docked and they make me do something that has to be changed before I can roll. Chock the wheels, disconnect the air lines, lower the landing gear, etc. When I see the flag I know there is something that I have to do before I even turn the key.

I go big: a clipboard. A few pages of paper with their own signs: CHOCKS or AIR LINES or SCALE LOAD for overnights at my first truck stop after the loading. Also, I stuck a Command hook on the shelves above the drivers seat. So I have a neat place to hang it. Literally in my face when I sit there.

Cwc's Comment
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I've been dispatched to pick up an empty on several occasions that had been pad locked. So I carry two large box wrenchs for lock removal. Put both of the long ends of the open ends into the lock and squeeze them together.. Lock snaps apart.

I also carry a paint marker for tight maneuvers. If I need to slide my tendems I can mark them and return them to the same spot afterwards.

Backing in the daytime you can watch the shadow of the trailer get close to whatever you backing up to.

Most of the trucks I've been in has a factory CB hook up area with a strap. When the suction cup fails on your GPS or you wanna be tecnically legal, strap the GPS down on the CB mounting area. Getting it off the windshield. (I did this after several people had been ticketed for having them on the windshield)

Bud A.'s Comment
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Glad hand seals come in 2 types....one lip and double lip. I bought the singles and they just fell out.

The also come in rubber or plastic which can differ on life expectancy

Most companies parts departments (including Prime's) will give you a bag full of glad hand seals for free. No need to buy them.

sculpy's Comment
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Just wanted to say that i'm loving this thread. Extremely informative for a hopeful like me. Thank you all for your contributions, and keep them coming!

I'm going to start a file organized alphabetically by topic and fill it with hints like these so I can review it with my training materials.

Errol V.'s Comment
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Just wanted to say that i'm loving this thread. Extremely informative for a hopeful like me. Thank you all for your contributions, and keep them coming!

I'm going to start a file organized alphabetically by topic and fill it with hints like these so I can review it with my training materials.

Props for Rainy for starting this thread. I had the idea also, using a title like "Trucking Lore", or "Stuff Your Trainer Never Taught You But You Oughtta Know". But Rainy pulled this off, and now I'm just a contributor.

And, yes, sculpy, these ideas will really make your trucking life easier!

G-Town's Comment
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Setting tandems right the first time.

If moving the tandems "precisely" is required, I determine the distance from where the are currently set to the hole where I need them to be by walking-off the gap. If it's two lengths of my foot, I mark by placing a coin on the ground, that same distance from the front edge of the cab step under the door, either ahead of or behind it. I'll move the truck either forward or back until the front edge of the step is even with the coin. It always works, the first time. A time saver.

This exact same technique can be used when backing up to a wall or the back of another trailer to mark the distance accurately thus reducing the chance of hitting the object.

When someone sees me doing this, they many times will inquire on what exactly I am doing. Almost invariably they will then say, "thanks", "I am going to try that."

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tractor Man's Comment
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Errol, I saw somewhere online to get a piece of galvanized or black steel pipe. A 10 or 12 inch long nipple threaded on both ends. I'm guessing 1 1/4 inch and buy a cap to put on 1 end. Slide it in the hole and the cap keeps it from sliding through. I'm gonna pick one up myself next time I'm home!

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Black pipe is less expensive. I've seen people buy an elbow rather than a cap because it sort of gives you a handle, if that makes sense?

Thanks BZ. That makes more sense! I will take it a step further. 10 inch nipple, 90 degree elbow, 6 inch nipple, cap on the end of the 6 inch. Perfect L shape with a handle to grab on to. Kinda like a Long Barrel Colt!

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