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Tips, Tricks, And Techniques For Rookie Drivers

Topic 16099 | Page 6

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Patrick C.'s Comment
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I made a "flag" from a paper clip and some reflective tape. I hang it above the steering wheel so that I can't drive while it's there. I do this when I'm docked and they make me do something that has to be changed before I can roll. Chock the wheels, disconnect the air lines, lower the landing gear, etc. When I see the flag I know there is something that I have to do before I even turn the key.

In Aviation we have a whole lot of similar red "flags". They say "Rrmove Before Flight." LoL

Sharron R.'s Comment
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To Rainy D and everyone sharing... Thank You!!! 😀 I'm already learning so much from you even though I haven't been to school yet (going this Summer). I love TT!! The more I read different forums, threads, etc... the more I can't wait to get in the truck!!!!

thank-you.gif

What are some of the things you learned on your own or needed to know that no one told you before you went solo? I thought we could use this thread to educate newbies ;)

What to do when you jump the fifth wheel ---

If thw landing gear is too high and you back under the trailer, the kingpin then gets "stuck" between the skid plate and the cab.

Easy fix. Drop the airbags, and place a hammer under the lower end of the skid plate. This will raise one end and flatten it. Then drive out from under trailer.

Shellback Trucker's Comment
member avatar

My rookie tip it really sucks moving the tandems 1 or 2 holes you could be going back and forth all day. I decided to use the head of my hammer place it in the hold after the one you want to stop in them back or pull up you hear it hit then get out lock the tandems and your all done. Side note go slow because you might cut the head off your hammer if you're in a rush. Lol

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

My rookie tip it really sucks moving the tandems 1 or 2 holes you could be going back and forth all day. I decided to use the head of my hammer place it in the hold after the one you want to stop in them back or pull up you hear it hit then get out lock the tandems and your all done. Side note go slow because you might cut the head off your hammer if you're in a rush. Lol

I thought about that and decided I would be like Henry the VIII and the head would roll! Hahaha

If not.mentioned .... Howe's is NOT to be used as antigel. My friend swears he almost froze in his truck cause of it.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

What are these mythical tandems you speak of

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Vendingdude's Comment
member avatar

Tandems:. I've typically laid my gloves on the ground to mimic the distance I need to slide. Just put "origin" glove fingers pointing in direction of movement aimed at "target" glove and placed directly below mounting bolts of steps that are where your head is. Don't look in mirror when moving, just trust your markers.

Chocks:. Always use them if available. Always. I set them up a half inch in front of rear tire, with approximately two inches sticking out. This way they're visible in mirror and you can't forget they're there when pulling out. Not gonna embarrass myself by running over them when pulling out. Also gives you room to pound them out of the way if somehow trailer crept up during loading/unloading process and pinched it in there. Not all brakes are equal and vigorous forklift operation can shift the trailer up an inch or so on occasion.

Side note:. Be VERY sure you set brakes (and chock) after hitting dock. Almost got a warehouse worker killed after I had a very difficult blind side back and finally got out of the truck to shake off strained muscles and tension. Forgot to set brakes in haste to get out. Truck was on level ground and didn't roll, but when forklift operator went into the truck it caused just enough transferred momentum to cause truck to creep forward. I was outside of the truck and saw it moving out of the corner of my eye and was able to leap to truck, open door, dive inside and pull brakes at same instant portable dock plate crashed to ground. That sound (and a yell from another warehouse worker) alerted forklift driver to jam on brakes in the nick of time. The lift stopped with literally his back wheels off the truck and the cab leaning against the dock. The weight of the pallet he had on the forks kept him him upright, that and the fact I had pulled the brakes just in time. Both of us were scared sh*tless after this; I can only imagine how close this was to a real tragedy. He could have been killed, and I would most certainly have had my cateer/life ruined. Had to use another forklift to push the first one back into the truck. Set both of your brakes! Double check! Chock the trailer!

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dave's Comment
member avatar

When I'm backing into a spot, if I am straight, out of my driver's side mirror (the flat one) the back of my trailer will look closer to the line than the front of my trailer does. Out of my passenger side mirror (again, the flat one), if I'm straight the side of the trailer will appear parallel with the line.

Good to know. I thought I was going crazy or cross eyed or both. I've always noticed that one mirror the trailer will be parallel and the other it seems slanted. I thought it was me lol

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

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When I'm backing into a spot, if I am straight, out of my driver's side mirror (the flat one) the back of my trailer will look closer to the line than the front of my trailer does. Out of my passenger side mirror (again, the flat one), if I'm straight the side of the trailer will appear parallel with the line.

double-quotes-end.png

Good to know. I thought I was going crazy or cross eyed or both. I've always noticed that one mirror the trailer will be parallel and the other it seems slanted. I thought it was me lol

The adjustment of the mirrors is different, that's all. Next time you get a few minutes to spare, like when you're waiting to load or unload, get the truck as perfectly straight as you can and then adjust both mirrors so they look the same. It actually makes quite a difference helping you get backed in properly. Unfortunately not all mirrors will have the necessary adjustability built into the brackets to get it perfect, but hopefully you can get it real close.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Truck stops, or anywhere else you shutdown for your sleep. If available, try to get a fairly level spot so your not sleeping at a weird angle i.e. feet higher than your head. prevents a headache in the morning.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Twas just brought up on another thread....always scale with brakes released.

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