H.O. Wolding

Topic 16298 | Page 2

Page 2 of 8 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

On the bus and on my way. Isn't looking good. Have to wait and see if there is enough people. If not my 2 hour layover will get a lot longer. I am beginning to think I should of just rented a car and called it good, lol. I rather be driving than riding anyway.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
lol. I rather be driving than riding anyway.

Oh...... don't worry. Before long you'll be doing LOTS of driving! Good Luck

smile.gifgood-luck.gif

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

Well... I made it to Chicago. Now begins another layover. All this hurrying up to wait is almost worse than the military, lol. I truly dislike being unproductive. I am a do'er. Sitting here just waiting is borderline mind numbing. Then again it could just be the initial stages of sleep deprivation kicking in. Back to people watching I go. I will keep everybody up to speed.

icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

Well... I made it to Chicago. Now begins another layover. All this hurrying up to wait is almost worse than the military, lol. I truly dislike being unproductive. I am a do'er. Sitting here just waiting is borderline mind numbing. Then again it could just be the initial stages of sleep deprivation kicking in. Back to people watching I go. I will keep everybody up to speed.

Please do keep us updated! I have honestly heard nothing but good things about H.O. Wolding! That's always a positive.

Farmerbob1's Comment
member avatar

Well... I made it to Chicago. Now begins another layover. All this hurrying up to wait is almost worse than the military, lol. I truly dislike being unproductive. I am a do'er. Sitting here just waiting is borderline mind numbing. Then again it could just be the initial stages of sleep deprivation kicking in. Back to people watching I go. I will keep everybody up to speed.

I'd like to point out something here. Hurry up and wait is something you're going to be seeing a LOT of in the trucking industry. I strongly suspect that drivers in training are INTENTIONALLY exposed to long days, odd delays, and problems, to see how they react to irritating situations. It's far better for a company to discover someone has no patience and/or has a bad attitude during the training process, than after they get on the road.

Example:

You are assigned a load overnight. Your appointment is 0900, and getting there will be tight.

You manage to get there, barely on time.

You drop your trailer, and then have to sit for twelve hours before your load is ready.

You are expected to be ready to drive a full day after those twelve hours. If you can't, you won't make it to final on time.

BUT the timing of everything has put you off your normal sleep schedule, and you only got two hours sleep.

If you really can't drive due to fatigue, you might have to delay getting on the road or take a nap after a while to get some rest.

That leads to you only getting a couple hundred miles in before the load is repowered off you to a team or trainer truck that can get the delivery there on time.

**

The driver that most companies want, would simply do what they can do safely, and document on the trip sheet that they came off the sleeper line four hours before going back into sleeper. The next time that driver speaks to the DM , they will be calm, collected, and ask nicely for a load with plenty of time and a lot of miles to compensate for the tight load they couldn't complete due to sleep-time flipflopping.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

I understand patience is a virtue. I am fully aware I am not a very virtuous person in that arena. I am not going to be jumping up and down and acting a fool. I will get grumpy and sarcastic though. Well, more sarcastic. I am already a very sarcastic individual.

I figure if I do things right I should find constructive ways to utilize down time.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I'd like to point out something here. Hurry up and wait is something you're going to be seeing a LOT of in the trucking industry. I strongly suspect that drivers in training are INTENTIONALLY exposed to long days, odd delays, and problems, to see how they react to irritating situations. It's far better for a company to discover someone has no patience and/or has a bad attitude during the training process, than after they get on the road.

I agree with this completely. I believe the entire training process and orientation process is one long interview. They're going to be testing you to see if you're the type of person that has the right attitude, demeanor, listening skills, and ambition to handle this job. So approach everything that happens as if they're testing you to see how you'll react.

I will get grumpy and sarcastic though

You'll be shooting yourself in the foot if you do that in the beginning. People that work in the offices and experienced drivers that are doing the training do not take well to that sort of thing. Now once you really get to know someone you can probably cut loose a little bit. But in the beginning especially, lay low for a while. Wait until you see how many really lousy attitudes you're going to come across there from the other new drivers. Within a few hours of interacting with the others you're going to instantly be able to spot people who won't be around for long. And trust me, the people running these programs are watching closely for this also.

In fact, they're not only looking for lousy attitudes but they're looking to see which people hang out a lot with those lousy attitudes. So you would do yourself a favor to stay away from them. I can assure you there will be people who get sent home within the first few days simply because they don't have the right attitude to handle the challenges that are coming and stick around through it all. These companies aren't going to waste their time and money on people who will quit in a month anyhow, and they can spot em quickly.

So just lay low and go with the flow. That's the best approach to take. It's like a tryout to make the team and most people will not make the team. You'll see what I mean.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

Well.. I am here at the terminal. Bunk house is Spartan, but comfortable. Tomorrow will start bright and early at 6 am.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

First day is complete. Today we all went out to breakfast as 6am. After that we signed out vehicles and went to do physicals. We were broke down into 2 groups and sent separate places for physicals. There are 5 of us in orientation. I guess that is a big group for orientation. Normally they only have 2 to 4 people. After physicals we did road tests. After road tests was lunch. After lunch we went down to 1 of the 2 training yards. We worked on a 90 degree back with a 53' trailer. We backed between 2 trailers. The out of bounds is 50' from the edge of the trailers. We also worked on button hook turns. I thought is was cool because 1 of the owning family came down to watch the training. I know I am going to enjoy working here. Everybody calls each other by first names. Everybody has been super friendly and approachable. Of all the drivers I have talked to, they all say the same thing. Focus on safety and work hard. If you work hard, the company will bend over backwards to get you home time. Even it means sending you home deadhead or bobtail. Btw, we get paid the same rate regardless of loaded, unloaded, or bobtail. Well, time to go. Need to go grab some supper.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Page 2 of 8 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

H.O. Wolding Becoming A Truck Driver Company Trainers Life On The Road On The Road In Training Truck Driver Training
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More