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I need to decide between Prime, Schneider or Maverick

Topic 17369 | Page 4

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Buck_weat's Comment
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The time it takes for 30k teaming depends on how hard the trainer runs. One trainer could have you running 6k mikes per week son in five weeks you are done. My trainer ran less miles as a team than I did solo. Serious in two weeks her friend and i did 12k miles. It took me and her a month for that!

Keep in mind that even with all that training....I still was nervous going out on my own. I can't imagine only three weeks of training.

Well I found out real fast that it shows in WY even on Easter and 4th of July lol.

The bad thing about primes training is that lease and owner ops get to decide where they want to drive. Which means even if in training and you WANT to drive in the snow for experience....you might not. That is something to ask your trainer. I came in winter for winter training and my oo trainer only really drove us through two snow storms. That wasn't enough time for me.

The GOOD thing about teaming in training..because the person is asleep...I drove better. Having someone watch your every move 24/7 drove me nuts and messed me up more. When I didn't feel.watched I could relax.

Whatever you decide, I wish you luck. As long as you stick with a major carrier you can't go wrong for your training and experience. After that year if you have doubts about the company than shoo around. I planned on only staying my year then going local...but I got it so good with my FM I was like "WHY"? Lol. I'm saving so.much money by living on the truck I would be just as miserable driving local as I was with a non driving job.

Thanks, Rainy..that gives me a lot to think about. I am leaning hard toward Prime, and chances are that's where I'll go. Have a safe and Merry Christmas! I'm sure I'll have a ton of questions as I progress through training and such, but I'll try no to pester you too much!

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Buck_weat's Comment
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Ignore the post just before this one. For some reason it mixed in with yours and difficult to figure out.

PI&I Motor Express in Masury,OH is flatbed and Teamsters and hires new grads. Nick Strimbu Inc. has the better reputation though. If it were me, would go with Nick Strimbu Inc. reefer division, but that's me; you will decide what's best for you and your family.

Thanks, Seadragon. I will check them out. Merry Christmas!

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Rainy D.'s Comment
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Prime insurance isn't "bad" per SE. I have one monthly RX that is $150 but I pay zero. The other was an antibiotic and I dont think I paid for that either. The dental and vision are great, the same policies I had at the USPS. I don't like the $50 doctor copay..but the USPS copay is now $40, and this job is better. For drivers there is a doctor in our terminal who takes our insurance. And a shuttle that will take you to the dentist and eye doctor there. Take care of stuff in Springfield instead of using home time ;)

We have a high and low plan...the first year I went for the cheaper one cause the insurance drops so much after the first year.

I compared it to the obamacare offerings and for me it was better and cheaper than what they offered at the time.

Again, most of the big carriers are going to be good. If you make a wrong choice for you then wait a year and change companies..it's not that long.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Seadragon H.'s Comment
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I had BCBS through the Teamsters and for a family of 4 it cost me $21.00 weekly. I didn't stay there long, but that's what it cost while I was there 8 yrs. ago. I'm sure it's much higher now, but still cheaper than non-union companies.

Prime insurance isn't "bad" per SE. I have one monthly RX that is $150 but I pay zero. The other was an antibiotic and I dont think I paid for that either. The dental and vision are great, the same policies I had at the USPS. I don't like the $50 doctor copay..but the USPS copay is now $40, and this job is better. For drivers there is a doctor in our terminal who takes our insurance. And a shuttle that will take you to the dentist and eye doctor there. Take care of stuff in Springfield instead of using home time ;)

We have a high and low plan...the first year I went for the cheaper one cause the insurance drops so much after the first year.

I compared it to the obamacare offerings and for me it was better and cheaper than what they offered at the time.

Again, most of the big carriers are going to be good. If you make a wrong choice for you then wait a year and change companies..it's not that long.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

People have no idea how much insurance actually costs. My family owned an auto body shop in Philadelphia I used to manage. The cost for a good family plan was $2500 per month...in 1998! Yes, as the employer we paid $2000 of that. Region makes a difference though...the same plan in WV could have been half that.

G-Town's Comment
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Buck wheat...there were several midsize companies suggested in addition to your three. All good but you need to think about what company will offer you the very best finish training. The secondaries mentioned by Seadragon may be good but to the best of my knowledge we cannot offer firsthand experience gained from a successful trainee at any of them. That said,...knowledge is king and what we have on Seadrogon's suggestions is very limited.

The three carriers on your shortlist all offer proven and effective finish training. Cannot go wrong. Many, many drivers on this forum have completed finish training with Prime, Schneider, and Maverick. All first hand experience and relevant to helping you decide.

6 string rhythm's Comment
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Sorry "Buck weat"

Wookin' pa nub.

G-Town's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

Sorry "Buck weat"

double-quotes-end.png

Wookin' pa nub.

Vintage SNL... "Damnit"

Seadragon H.'s Comment
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All companies that hire new cdl grads have finish training. Trucking companies won't hire new cdl grads and just throw them to the wolves in that expensive equipment. New drivers get caught up with the companies schools push and don't realize there's 350,000 trucking companies in the USA. Schools usually push 4 or 5 companies to the students because it makes their job placement easier because they don't have to spend hours and hours researching for what's available. The smaller, less known companies I mention to people are real picky about who they hire from cdl schools, so to be accepted should be a high compliment; the bar is set high.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

All companies that hire new cdl grads have finish training. Trucking companies won't hire new cdl grads and just throw them to the wolves in that expensive equipment. New drivers get caught up with the companies schools push and don't realize there's 350,000 trucking companies in the USA. Schools usually push 4 or 5 companies to the students because it makes their job placement easier because they don't have to spend hours and hours researching for what's available. The smaller, less known companies I mention to people are real picky about who they hire from cdl schools, so to be accepted should be a high compliment; the bar is set high.

Seadragon...I get that. And obviously they offer finish training, however how good is it, to what extent, and what can you offer describing your first hand experience with any of them? We discourage here say on TT.

I think your heart is in the right place but forgive me, you seem to be on a mission to dissuade the newbie's from the Mega Carriers. (Am I the only one who is reading this pattern?).

Objectivity is the best approach when a newbie has narrowed their field to two or three finalists. And then out of the blue you reply with "check out ABC Company, they hire trainees." I could easily throw out other options to Buck weat, but that will only confuse him and compromise my role as a Moderator.

I have already suggested (asked) you to provide more details to Brett to include in the TT review wiki. Otherwise what you offer is little more than name dropping.

We are here to offer proven options for the student prospect, options that are backed up with first hand experiences as shared in the diary section.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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