I Need To Decide Between Prime, Schneider Or Maverick

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Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Buckwheat, I'm sorry to hear things didn't work out for you - man that's a bummer!

I want to point out a few things here because you just have no idea how many people will read this thread in the future. I hope we can be of some help to both you and them.

You've only been out there doing this for three months at the most, less than that as a solo driver. Look at what you said to us just before you got started...

everyone here is helping me tremendously, not only here in this post but everywhere I read on this awesome site.

What happened to you? Once you got started, you dropped off the face of the earth! We haven't even heard from you until you threw in the towel.

If we were really all that helpful to you, why did you quit seeking our help or asking us a few simple questions after you became a solo driver? Man, don't you realize we would have been able to give you all kinds of good solid advice? For one thing we could have helped guide you into a better way to transition to a different job before you just up an quit the one you were at.

I want to point out to each of you reading this what got to Buckwheat and why he didn't succeed at his first job. It was the mental part of the job - He couldn't handle the being away from home. It didn't have anything to do with all the stuff that rookies get all worked up about like shifting gears, handling the mountains, or driving in the snow. It had nothing to do with the physical aspects of or just the mechanics of the job, it was the mental challenge, and that is what kills most of the newbies who get started in this. It is also why I am disappointed that he didn't come in here looking for some advice from us. We have all been down this road, and while I don't know if we could have saved his job for him, we certainly could have given it a shot. As it was, he just slogged through it and then gave up. Now he has a paltry three months experience and he's quit his job. I know he can get hired, but man he could have done himself a big favor by seeking some good solid guidance from those who understand just exactly what he was going through.

Folks we are not just here to try to help you get those training wheels on a truck and get started, we will keep helping you get through that initial and critical first year out here. To be honest with you, we will be glad to help you at anytime, but we can't help you if you don't ask us questions!

Buckwheat, I completely understand man. In fact after years of being out here, there are still days that I just want to be back home leading a normal life. But for me, the fact is that I could do that, and still choose to be out here. I do this because I really enjoy the challenges of the career. I am passionate about it, and that is what keeps me here. Just getting up each day and moving the products that are needed to keep this great country's economy humming along exhilerates me - I don't know how else to express it - I love this job! Sure I vacillate back and forth emotionally at times, but I work through those thoughts and issues and have been very successful out here, not only financially, but also mentally, and that is where the biggest struggle is at - in your head and your emotions. Those are things that have got to be conquered for you to be successful out here.

I wish you the best Buckwheat, and trust me I understand that this Over The Road stuff is not for everybody, but I just wish we could have helped you make your transition a little smoother. There are all kinds of truck driving jobs out there, and the country needs each and every one of us giving it our best. From local delivery guys in box trucks to those of us chasing that long black ribbon across the country in a grand old American Big Rig, each job is critically important. The thing is, we could have given you some good advice that would have helped you get into something more to your liking, and made a smooth transition into it. As it is you are now back to square one. Remember how much you struggled with that part of it - trying to decide which company to go with?

We want to help you guys be successful at this, and we can. The key is that you have got to let us know what is going on so we can help you when you need it. For all we knew Buckwheat was out there living the life, and then Bam! we hear that he has quit.

It bothers me. Not that he quit, but that we didn't get to try and assist him. I know we could have at least given some sound advice. He may not have taken it, and that is fair enough, but I have a feeling we could have been a big help.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

I agree with you old school. It bothers me personally because I work there and know how to get things done to an extent. Although I'm not on the tcd side, communication is key. There was a time where I wasn't getting home on time or at all the way I wanted. Instead of leaving, I simply sent my FM a message asking how we could work together to make it happen. I've been home every Friday this entire year so far. I believe I've proven myself to them at this point and feel taken care of. If buck would have said something I could have helped but I don't know his situation so I can't really say. Wish he would have come to flatbed. Anyway, still wish him well wherever he goes.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

CT, I'm fairly certain those guys on the refrigerated side at Maverick can't get home every weekend, and that was probably a big part of his struggle. Most folks don't realize how difficult it is to transition into this over the road lifestyle. We see the romantic side of it all when we first start looking into it, and then one day we face the harsh reality of it as it stares us in the face on a daily basis.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes I know old school, I actually mentioned that earlier in this thread if you look back a few pages. But as you flatbed isn't for everyone.

Don R.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes it is too bad he didn't reach out for advice and learn other options. Anyways, after some research and reading posts I did try Maverick, but they would not talk to me as I didn't have three years of recent work history and Schneider talked me to and continued the Job App, I passed the Urine/hair follicle drug test and because it has been quite a few months since I graduated from trucking school they are sending me to a truck refresher school for three days, if do good there then on to Green Bay, WI for eighteen days of training then after that I will know more. I have a clean personal driving history & free of no drunk driving or felonies. I have been single for a long time and used to be alone so I feel I can handle being gone a lot over the road.. After getting the one year experience under my belt I will decide if I want to stay with Schneider until I retire for good or look for another company as some I read are offering .52 cpm solo OTR. I like the fact that Schneider is a big company with different modes of trucking, like going to ports, dedicated, OTR and etc. I will admit I am nervous as I have not worked in a while but looking forward to start this new chapter in my life and seeing more of this country soon. Safe trucking everyone!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Buck_weat's Comment
member avatar

Hi Old School and C.T.,

Thank you both for replying.

I totally agree with you, Old School. I should have asked for more help before I quit, and I should have given more updates as I went along. You are right - it was a mental thing. It wasn't the physical side (although that part WAS hard at times as well). When I first left for orientation, I was gone for about 7 weeks straight. I went through orientation, flatbed training and then glass training. (C.T., I was in the glass division). Then I went out with my trainer for 4 weeks. Next was final eval and I picked up my truck. Then I did finally get to go home for about a week.

When I started driving solo it was all good at first. But as I continued it was getting harder to leave the house after my 3 weeks out. I started dreading having to leave knowing it would be a long three weeks until I made it home again. I could have stayed out for just two weeks, but the home time was not guaranteed then. I would get by the house, but maybe only for a 10 hour break.

What I said before about the work being hard at times is also true. It is not the main reason that I quit, but as I think about it, it did contribute. It IS a lot of work securing and tarping the glass, and it took me a lot of time (5-6 HOURS on my first couple loads.) Everyone said I would get better and faster with time, which was probably true. But I am almost 50 years old and not in great shape, so it was pretty hard for me. Not unbearable, but hard work. I asked my fleet manager if I could switch to the TCD (referigerated) division, and he said I should stick it out in glass for a while and I would get used to it. I did for a while, but I asked him again, and he said it might take a few weeks to make it happen. So by this time I wasn't liking glass, AND I wasn't getting home enough.

So a couple of weeks ago, I was doing a 34 hour reset at a Maverick terminal , and the whole time I was thinking "I could be home right now". So I rented a car and cleaned out my truck and went home. I called my fleet manager and told him and that was that.

I regret making a hasty decision like that, and I am not usually that way. I don't know..it just got to me mentally and I was not happy when I was out. Trucking is a totally different lifestyle - at least OTR was for me. And I DID know this going in to it. I just thought I would get used to it. Yes, I could have waited to get into TCD, and the work would have been easier, but I would have still had to be out 2 -3 weeks at a time. And that, at least for me, is too much time away from my wife and family.

So that is the story of why I quit. I should have asked for more help/advise on here along the way. If I do get another trucking job, I will be sure and not drop off the face of the earth again. Hopefully I can find something with weekly home time. Or maybe trucking just isn't the right thing for me.

Thanks for reading, and have a GREAT day !

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Don R.'s Comment
member avatar

Is there a Gypsum Express near by you? I hear they get home weekends? At least that is what the website claims. Every once a while I see in the employment section, local driver jobs, not sure about needing OTR experience, depends on the job & company. I have none but will soon thru Schneider if it all works out with the refresher school & etc. Good luck

Hi Old School and C.T.,

Thank you both for replying.

I totally agree with you, Old School. I should have asked for more help before I quit, and I should have given more updates as I went along. You are right - it was a mental thing. It wasn't the physical side (although that part WAS hard at times as well). When I first left for orientation, I was gone for about 7 weeks straight. I went through orientation, flatbed training and then glass training. (C.T., I was in the glass division). Then I went out with my trainer for 4 weeks. Next was final eval and I picked up my truck. Then I did finally get to go home for about a week.

When I started driving solo it was all good at first. But as I continued it was getting harder to leave the house after my 3 weeks out. I started dreading having to leave knowing it would be a long three weeks until I made it home again. I could have stayed out for just two weeks, but the home time was not guaranteed then. I would get by the house, but maybe only for a 10 hour break.

What I said before about the work being hard at times is also true. It is not the main reason that I quit, but as I think about it, it did contribute. It IS a lot of work securing and tarping the glass, and it took me a lot of time (5-6 HOURS on my first couple loads.) Everyone said I would get better and faster with time, which was probably true. But I am almost 50 years old and not in great shape, so it was pretty hard for me. Not unbearable, but hard work. I asked my fleet manager if I could switch to the TCD (referigerated) division, and he said I should stick it out in glass for a while and I would get used to it. I did for a while, but I asked him again, and he said it might take a few weeks to make it happen. So by this time I wasn't liking glass, AND I wasn't getting home enough.

So a couple of weeks ago, I was doing a 34 hour reset at a Maverick terminal , and the whole time I was thinking "I could be home right now". So I rented a car and cleaned out my truck and went home. I called my fleet manager and told him and that was that.

I regret making a hasty decision like that, and I am not usually that way. I don't know..it just got to me mentally and I was not happy when I was out. Trucking is a totally different lifestyle - at least OTR was for me. And I DID know this going in to it. I just thought I would get used to it. Yes, I could have waited to get into TCD, and the work would have been easier, but I would have still had to be out 2 -3 weeks at a time. And that, at least for me, is too much time away from my wife and family.

So that is the story of why I quit. I should have asked for more help/advise on here along the way. If I do get another trucking job, I will be sure and not drop off the face of the earth again. Hopefully I can find something with weekly home time. Or maybe trucking just isn't the right thing for me.

Thanks for reading, and have a GREAT day !

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Buck_weat's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Don R.

I live in southern Ohio, but I will check to see what their hiring area is.

Have a GREAT day!

Don R.'s Comment
member avatar

Your welcome and I just looked up the Gypsum express site, here are two in Ohio, 56270 Dillies Bottom Road Shadyside , OH 43947 and 412 S Buffalo St , Vanlue , OH 45890 http://www.gypsumexpress.com/careers/

I wanted to work for Maverick myself but while talking to them & the fact I didn't have three recent years of work history they said sorry. Schneider is taking a chance on me so I am looking forward to this opportunity as I go thru the motions Have a great day also

Thanks Don R.

I live in southern Ohio, but I will check to see what their hiring area is.

Have a GREAT day!

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Nothing against Gypsum as they're an excellent company, maverick flatbed regional drivers like me are home every weekend l. I'm on home time right now.

Buck, I may have gotten you mixed up with someone in the tcd division, didn't know you went glass. That was my original plan until I talked to a few drivers and did some research online. I decided to take a pay cut and do regional flatbed. If you can do glass, you can do flatbed for sure. Those guys stay out much longer than my wife and I were comfortable with. Ohio is a great area for us freight wise, and home time in the flatbed division shouldn't be a problem.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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