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I might be done

Topic 17543 | Page 1

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Gladhand's Comment
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I disappeared last time because I got into some trouble when I backed into another trucks mirror and got put OOS in Arizona. Today I hit another trailers door with my trailer door in a tight dock. Knocked the other door right off. I will probably be a high risk driver now with the two incidents as well as that overweight ticket. Now I'm worried that I won't be a driver at swift anymore.

If anything I am really frustrated right now, it feels like all the odds are against me. Starting to doubt if I should be behind the wheel of this expensive piece of equipment.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

There's a place we load at in the Atlanta area where the docks are soooo tight you can't hardly open your truck door when docked. Drivers have to fold in their mirrors even.. it's just awful there.

Gladhand, I really think you'll be okay. In super tight situations like that, we generally try to wait to dock until after the neighboring truck has pulled away from the docks, because sometimes there's literally only a couple inches between the pinned back trailer doors. I really think Swift will understand this and has probably seen that kind of thing happen before. .. I know I sure have.

Yes, waiting to dock in places like that causes a longer delay, but the reduced risk is sure worth it IMHO. I hate places like that lol, thankfully for us, they're few and far between.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Man, you just have to take your time and think things through. It doesn't take any backing skills at all to eventually get backed in safely somewhere. It just takes a lot of patience and diligence. Take all the time you need and get out and look as many times as you need to in order to get backed in safely. Simple as that.

I'm not sure how you got the overweight ticket but no one considers that much of a concern.

And the fact that you blanked out your entire online Web presence because of what sounds like a relatively minor and ordinary situation seems like quite an overreaction.

It just seems to me like with more experience you'll learn to slow down your mind a little bit and be a little more patient and diligent. Bumping into things has nothing to do with your backing skills and everything to do with your approach to this job. Maybe you get nervous when you're holding people up or someone is watching? Maybe you're trying to move that truck faster than you can observe everything that's going on around you?

Regardless of what's going on, you simply have to slow down and be more careful - simple as that. That's a skill anyone can develop.

After all my years of driving rigs I learned to relax, take it slow, and just take it all in. I try to enjoy driving or whatever it is I'm doing no matter what the circumstances. Keep your mind focused on the moment and keep your nerves calm. Relax, take your time, and pay attention to all of the little details around you.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

You have worries because that's what's in your head and heart. But Safety will also consider how you are doing as a company driver. From what you've written here, I believe you are in the top tier. That's going to count fit something. Also, both of those bumps are in the same category: backing. Expect, ask for, some serious backing practice.

Finally, that's what GOAL is all about. Many, if not most, drivers get a bit cokky* and skip that part sometimes. I admit I do. BUT, remember, (this is where I got a backing incident) you must watch both sides of the truck at all times. And if the truck is "bent", and you have half an atom of doubt about the side you can't see, GOAL it.

In the big picture, these are little things. You are stewing about them now. This is good, because you are becoming an expert in close quarter backing.

* Getting around the censor bot!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the replies. I definitely need to learn how to relax. Was starting to get more angry because I wasn't able to pick up a load in time because the shipper is closed which leads to me losing a good load afterwards. Had hell getting someone to dispatch me that when I finally did it was too late.

I know better already, but it is so easy to get super frustrated over things that are out of my control.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Gladhand, it's also important to self-examine what you are doing. Your very own "You Are Here" moment. So you can understand things you've done and how they fit into where you are headed. You are already doing that, but maybe you don't think of it in those terms.

you-are-here_2.png

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mr M's Comment
member avatar

I learned to always goal unless its a straight back but into a dock i still goal to make sure im 100% lined up. One time i goal 7 times in a super tight back. But i didn't hit anything and i got it in

Mr M's Comment
member avatar

Oh and talk to older guys driving 40+ years what the secret is and they will tell you: g.o.a.l.

Nancy F.'s Comment
member avatar

And thanks for coming back and explaining all this. What I don't know scares me. If you lay it all out I can't fear it anymore. I will be in the same situation one day and if I see you (anyone) make it to the "other side", that makes me stronger. I need you to keep going and beat the odds. Thousands do, we can too.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, I started to get overconfident. It's dangerous to stop learning out here. The day we stop learning something is the day we need to quit.

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