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Lessons a Rookie learned in Maine....

Topic 17579 | Page 2

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G-Town's Comment
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I think G Town pictured you 13 1/2 feet in the air on top of a box with a snow shovel!

rofl-3.gifshocked.png

Like when you made the snow angels on the roof of your Swift wagon? It's not the fall that hurts, but the stop.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

I loaded a trailer on Friday that had a fabric roof. Don't know how they would get snow off of it? They are based in the mountains of VA. On a personal note, I hate driving behind a truck and having that huge sheet of snow blow off and land on my car. They can travel far when frozen or packed.

Steven H.'s Comment
member avatar

Would it makes sense if they would put a curved top on these trailers to help with this issue?

Bob K.'s Comment
member avatar

Maybe I need to wear those glasses that help old farts see close-up.

Just had my annual eye exam today. Getting my first pair of bifocals. Sucks getting old. lol

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
sculpy's Comment
member avatar

Just out of curiosity, is there anything to actually stop you getting on top of a trailer and getting the snow off yourself (aside from safety and common sense)? Assuming you can even manage to climb up there...

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

There's really no way to get up there, that's one big problem. There are no ladders or anything.

The second problem is the strength of the roof. If it's covered in snow you have no way of knowing the condition of the roof. Even after you started clearing the snow you still don't know the strength of it until you try walking on it. Super dangerous.

Finally, it's going to be slick as snot up there.

I've never seen anyone get on the roof of a dry van or reefer trailer and I wouldn't want to. Just too dangerous.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

There's really no way to get up there, that's one big problem. There are no ladders or anything.

The second problem is the strength of the roof. If it's covered in snow you have no way of knowing the condition of the roof. Even after you started clearing the snow you still don't know the strength of it until you try walking on it. Super dangerous.

Finally, it's going to be slick as snot up there.

I've never seen anyone get on the roof of a dry van or reefer trailer and I wouldn't want to. Just too dangerous.

Not only that, but 13 feet in the air is a lot higher than you think. I've been on top of a few 8 foot loads (plus 5 feet from the deck to the ground) to tarp and it's a looooong way down. Walking on wet / icy / snowy aluminum that might not be strong enough to keep me from falling through into the box? No way.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Serah D.'s Comment
member avatar

Now am curious. If its snowing and you are stuck at a truck stop or you are in the middle of nowhere...etc, the snow is piling and you cannot get up there and you need to keep driving, how do you get the snow shoveled from the roof of the truck?

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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