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Family Resistance

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Boxermom's Comment
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Hi,I'm very seriously considering a truck driving job. I'm very excited about it, and I know I'm up to the challenge and looking forward to the adventure. For the past 20 years I've been a wife,mom,and beauty salon owner operator. I know truck driving is a huge change,I think it'll be a good thing for me . The problem is my family,sisters and parents. They are throwing out all the negative stereotypes about truckers and the industry. They say it's hard work,and not a normal lifestyle. I know that. I'm not a normal person, I look forward to the challenges of becoming a truck driver. I know they love me and don't want to see me get hurt or killed, but I need some advice on how to reassure them that this kind of career ,lifestyle just might right up my alley. I could be happy beyond belief, or I could do it for a while and have lots of experiences to brag about at my next endeavor. I'd appreciate any feedback, thank you ,and I Love this forum! Marcia

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Marcia my Dad and Mom don't want to see me leave for long time frames and don't want me to get killed or hurt either but I went with my gut and now I only have 4 more weekends of training and I'm done and will hopefully be on the road real soon after that.

Mom particularly, doesn't want me to be a trucker because of the negative sterotypes with it and the bad experiences she's had with truckers on the highway, but a mother to mother conversation with my friend and school recruiter helped her see the truth. Trucking is a very rewarding and satisfying and exciting career if you stick with it.

Go with your gut, if you feel like your up to the challenge, go for it. That's what I'm doing. But make sure you do your research on the companies to make sure that they have what YOU want.

GOOD LUCK!! good-luck.gifgood-luck.gifgood-luck-2.gif

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Hi,I'm very seriously considering a truck driving job. I'm very excited about it, and I know I'm up to the challenge and looking forward to the adventure. For the past 20 years I've been a wife,mom,and beauty salon owner operator. I know truck driving is a huge change,I think it'll be a good thing for me . The problem is my family,sisters and parents. They are throwing out all the negative stereotypes about truckers and the industry. They say it's hard work,and not a normal lifestyle. I know that. I'm not a normal person, I look forward to the challenges of becoming a truck driver. I know they love me and don't want to see me get hurt or killed, but I need some advice on how to reassure them that this kind of career ,lifestyle just might right up my alley. I could be happy beyond belief, or I could do it for a while and have lots of experiences to brag about at my next endeavor. I'd appreciate any feedback, thank you ,and I Love this forum! Marcia

The only opinion that matters is you husband's. You two are a team and have to work to take care of your home and kids. If your kids are all grown, then it is only you and your husband to worry about. Your parents and siblings have no say in the matter. You should take their opinions into consideration. I hope this makes sense. Good luck to you.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Penny's Comment
member avatar

I understand the big career change. I'm making a pretty significant change myself. Fortunately my family is reasonably supportive, but I didn't really ask them. I informed them what I would be doing and what changes might occur. Now, my kids are grown. I am giving my daughter several months notice because I do help her with childcare. I think being in school (school starts next week for me!) will make a nice transition to get her ready for me not being available all the time as a babysitter.

But I digress.

If truck driving is really what you want to do, explain your reasoning as best you can to your family and do what you need to do. Sometimes our families are our biggest fans, and sometimes they just worry about what they don't necessarily understand or what would not be right for them.

Hang in there and stick with your convictions and enjoy your new career choice. That's what I plan to do!

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Marcia, truck driving is one of the most misunderstood careers there is. There is so much misinformation out here about truck driving that it is even crazy for the folks who really want to do this (like you) to get it all straight. We will always shoot straight with you in here, but I can't make that guarantee to you for any other informational web sites on trucking. We spend about half or more of our time dispelling non-factual stories about trucking companies, mis-information, and outright lies about this whole lifestyle, the companies we work for, and all kinds of things related to this career.

I think I can say that almost everyone of us has been through what you are experiencing from your family members, and I can promise you that it is worse for the ladies than it is for the men. Part of the problem is that there are a few bad apples in trucking, and this career does attract very independent types of people who have strong opinions and are unfortunately brazen at times. As you can tell by the good folks in this forum there are a lot of very interesting people out here doing this. There are a lot of professionals from former careers out here. I've even met a couple of former lawyers and a dentist who are driving trucks now. It is a grand adventure as far as I'm concerned. It is one of the last truly independent careers out here where you can be in control of your own success or failure. Nobody holds our hands out here, we succeed or fail on our own merits. I have likened it to being self-employed many times. I was a business owner for thirty years prior to taking this plunge, and all those years of having to make good solid decisions while being quick on my feet, have served me well out here.

We can probably help you better if we knew specifically what their protests are. That way we could arm you with our personal experiences in those specific areas. We also have several professional ladies in here who can give you the low down on what it is like for them out here. I realize the ladies have sort of a special set of circumstances that I probably never have to face, but the ones in here all seem to be thriving out here, and I'm sure that you can also.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Your husband's opinion makes a big difference. You need his support. However, if that one's not an issue, list the OBJECTIVE reasons you are doing this. If you've never been separated from your family for more than a few days, this will be a major change.

Fortunately I was in the Navy which prepared me for being separated from family for long periods. I live in an area not rich in jobs offering the kind of income my family a used to. TRUTH; if I could make the same money, be home every day and see the country on vacations, I would. And I LIKE driving. One of the most enjoyable jobs I've ever had.

Some people think you should live according to their logic. You have to live with yourself, your decisions and you know you can depend on you.

As a Driver, you're no longer expected to be a mechanic. You can get showers everyday. Most companies won't expect you to put yourself, the freight, their equipment or the public in danger. Just look at all the Attorney ads bragging about suing big truck companies. No load of toilet paper is worth a life. 🙂

Make the best decision for yourself and your family. Carry a positive attitude and do your absolute best. Have faith and trust that God will see you through.

I hope this helps.

Kat's Comment
member avatar

My parents were the same way. You know what turned them around?? I took my dad out with me as a passenger for the month of November. He got to see first hand what my new life was like and how well I handle myself and the truck. Needless to say, while both still worry about me, they have a much better opinion of this career and my ability to do it.

Jason G.'s Comment
member avatar

Not having started my career in trucking yet, I don't know that I can add too much here, but I can relate to that feeling of people assuming things and saying things to discourage you from pursuing something you want to do. When I had joined the Marines at 18, a lot of my friends were surprised and would say things like " you're too nice to be a Marine." They'd say that because they have this stereotype that Marines are all mean and rough. And I wasn't like that before the Marines, and maybe wasn't as rough after, but I said to them, " maybe the Marines could use a nice guy." So I did the Marines. Went on three deployments. Had to get shot at and fire back at times. People thought I was too nice of a guy for Marines but I did the job just as well I believe.

So I say all that because people. Ight think you can't be a trucker because you used to do hair or you're too...Fill in the blank. But you know what you can handle and what you're willing to go through for this adventure. And I think you're going to do it just fine if you know you have it in you.

Boxermom's Comment
member avatar

Thank you for all the great advice. My family is worried about me bieng out in the middle of nowhere ,or in a huge city that I'm not familiar with. What if I have a health issue? this job is so issolating! who is going to put my chains on in the snow and ice? you're going to shower at those dirty truck stops???? sitting all the time is detrimental to your health. You will be responsible for a very large ,very expensive peice of equipment,and all the other people on the road. You're going to have to lift tarps that weigh more than you do.....I think I covered most of their concerns. I don't have a husband ,my kids are adults on their own,no pets or house that need my attention. I was leaning towards starting with Roehl, but now, I'm thinking about enrolling in a local CDL school to try and stay closer to home at least in the short term. I'd appreciate any advice and comments,thank you so much. Marcia

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

You will be on the road for weeks at a time, then home for three or four days. As for the specific questions you just asked:

My family is worried about me bieng out in the middle of nowhere ,or in a huge city that I'm not familiar with.
You will mostly have directions and a GPS. You may certainly get misplaced, but you will need to understand your GPS and your map book. And there's always your dispatch of and your phone.

What if I have a health issue?
On the road it will often be up to you to locate an urgent care type place. (Heads up: don't go to an ER unless it's truly an emergency. A friend of mine went to an ER and got that huge ER bill.)

this job is so issolating!
Yes it is.

who is going to put my chains on in the snow and ice?
Who do you think? There are ways to "throw iron" that don't get you very dirty/muddy/snowy

you're going to shower at those dirty truck stops????
Many truck stop chains advertise "cleanest showers on the Interstate". No worries here.

sitting all the time is detrimental to your health.
Yes, so every several hours get out and take a short walk.

You will be responsible for a very large ,very expensive peice of equipment,
That's why you'll get about two months of training before your company let's you go it alone.

.... and all the other people on the road.
Your company will be almost ceaseless in your safety training & classes.

You're going to have to lift tarps that weigh more than you do.
Only flatbed drivers do that, and several lady skateboard haulers have been though Trucking Truth.

I was leaning towards starting with Roehl, but now, I'm thinking about enrolling in a local CDL school
A heads up about "private" Truck Driving Schools: most are quality operations, however realistically they focus only on the schooling (what you paid them for). In a Company-Sponsored Training Program you are all but hired by that company when you start class. And you instantly start paying your tuition when you begin your driving career.

.... to try and stay closer to home at least in the short term.
Marcia, nearly every company you look at all be putting you into OTR for quite a while before you can talk to them about "local". Yes, you can find local gigs, but the companies will be smaller, along with their resources.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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