Having A Hard Time Getting Companies To Consider Me !?

Topic 17610 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

I'll try to make this question as brief as possible (never easy for me to do): I've decided on a CDL school (private), it's accredited by PTDI, which I thought was a good idea, but the school is in a state (Montana) where only a few trucking companies are located. I decided to go the private school route so I would have a plethora of job opportunities; I don't mind paying the tuition up-front. I don't have a traditional home address, as I'm moving back to the U.S. from out-of-country, and thought I would call my new 'home' the city or town where I got my new job. My first home will be the trucking school in Montana, my second home will be Anytown, USA, where the job is. But the trucking company recruiters are wanting me to live in the area they are hiring out of. So after obtain my CDL-A w/all of the endorsements, I would need to then move to a state or region where there are jobs first, then re-apply all over again. I thought the trucking companies would love the fact that I can move to wherever they are hiring out of, that the flexibility of my situation would appeal to them, but it is turning out to be just the opposite. I feel like now I should re-evaluate my trucking school decision. I won't start until late March, haven't paid any money yet, but really like the school... any thoughts or advice would be very much appreciated! I admire & respect the heck out of you guys & gals and have learned much already by reading your comments.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Regardless of whether you go to an Independent Truck Driving School or a Company-Sponsored Training Program you're going to have to have a permant residence listed. You're going to have to have a regular U.S. driver's license before starting the schooling and whatever the address is on that license will be considered your home address.

So I don't think there's any reason to reconsider your schooling choices based upon this situation. You have to get a U.S. driver's license if you don't have one already and you're going to have to have a permanent residence listed regardless of the school you attend.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you Brett for answering... I moved from Virginia, and that license is good until 2018. I was under the impression that when I got to Montana, I would have that license transferred to Montana, effectively making Montana my new permanent residence. The address l would use would be the address of the hotel arranged by the school. They say they do that frequently. Should I not be transferring my VA drivers license to Montana? I thought I had to in order to get my CDL license there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Pete, a Virginia address would be much more advantageous than Montana. Almost everybody has trucks running through Virginia. I think you've got to seriously reconsider your approach to this. You have got to have an address established first. This is a homeland security issue, and I don't see your plan working like you thought it would. You can use a friend's or relative's address if needed, but your first step has got to be to establish a residency here.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Old School, I appreciate the reply! I do have my sister, mom, and cousin living in VA, using one of their addresses wouldn't be a problem. I've got nothing but time right now, so I'll spend it figuring this out.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

You mentioned something about working outside the US?

I don't have a traditional home address, as I'm moving back to the U.S. from out-of-country, and thought I would call my new 'home' the city or town where I got my new job

How long were you abroad? Active Duty MIL, or some other type of work? Can you DOCUMENT YOUR EMPLOYMENT, as companies will check references? Did you keep your Va Drivers License active the whole time?

I think the biggest stumbling block to a hire, will depend on how long you were living abroad - and whether your employment can be verified.

As Brett and others have suggested - keeping your VA address and DL might be the best bet initially - unless you are actually looking to relocate to the home state of whatever trucking company you end up with. If you have a close relative (sister, mom, cousin) in VA - probably best to use one of their addresses to (re)establish residency - at least initially - until you decide where you want to end up.

Also - you are probably better off applying and getting a hire to a COMPANY SPONSORED PROGRAM - because at that point - assuming you don't have any issues with work histories, health, criminal, etc. - you are pretty much guaranteed a job once you complete training.

OTOH - going to a private school - in no way obligates ANYONE TO HIRE YOU. Most reputable schools have a pretty good placement record - but none of them can guarantee a job - and you still have to PAY THEM FOR YOUR SCHOOLING.

If you get bounced out of an orientation before you start training for any reason - background, work history, health issues, etc. - you'll be out of pocket your expenses home - but won't be on the hook for a $4-6K schooling bill and NO JOB.

Rick

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Rick, thank you for your response... re: my employment in Ecuador, my wife and I started our own business (restaurant) which we ran for 2 1/2 yrs. before selling it, now we have a tour company... I can show where I've paid into the Ecuadorian social security system with receipts. My VA drivers license is still current... my work history dating back to 1993 is excellent and uninterrupted right up until we left the U.S. in 2013. I did make some progress today with recruiters in that two companies so far have expressed interest in hiring me once I graduate, and two more all but ensured I could work for them once I've (1) contacted them again after I've begun the schooling, and (2) once I hire on with them, would have 30 days to transfer my CDL license to their state. Most companies I've applied to have told me to contact them once I'm in school. My situation is a little out-of-the-box and it seems they want to make sure I follow through on my end before they expend any energy or costs on their end. From what I've been reading there are many dropouts in the schools, and drivers who are not sure if this is for them and last less than a year, so I can understand the apprehension on the companies' part to take me seriously when I haven't even made it back to the country yet! Unfortunately the way I'm built is that I want to get all this resolved now. Now. Not after I've started school. But now. Once school begins I want to focus on the training, not looking for a job. This isn't something I'm going to back out of. Here's where I get to practice 'patience,' which keeps coming up in this forum!

Thank you for getting back to me Rick, I'm sorry for the long-winded reply. Drive safe!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Hmmmm.

Are you a dual national? I believe you are still required to file income tax returns and claim foreign income - this would most likely prove your overseas employment. You may want to speak to an accountant here, to make sure you aren't going to get "jammed up" when you pop back up on the radar here after 4 years.

The gaps are what they are looking for. Need to make sure you weren't in an AQ/ISIS training camp.

You should continue applying to companies like: Prime, WilTrans, Jim Palmer, Swift, etc. - to see if they'll give you a shot at company sponsored training. You also want to try and obtain a "Pre-Hire Letter" from one of the companies that said they would hire you after school - to further demonstrate on THEIR PART that they are willing to give you a shot.

Keep in mind - the pre-hire is NOT A GUARANTEE OF EMPLOYMENT.

The thing we're trying to avoid here - is spending $$ on private school - and then not being able to get a hire, because of your "weird overseas employment history" - this counts DOUBLE IF YOU ARE CLAIMING SELF EMPLOYED. It's almost easier to be an EMPLOYEE - because at least your references can be contacted.

I have a similar deal (minus the overseas). I have my own business - but I also have corporate/personal tax returns and W-2's, plus references from clients and my accountant proving my self-employment status. But the company I apply to - would still be calling ME as the business owner I claim to be employed by. Not really an issue in my case - perhaps more of one, when we talk about a business in a foreign country.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Wow, I am such an idiot. Of course I filed taxes every year! It completely escaped me... No, not a dual national. I'm a Virginian, born/raised in and near Richmond... "To be a Virginian either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even on one’s mother’s side, is an introduction to any state in the Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from Above." ... but apparently doesn't afford employment with some companies if I've been out of the country for three years! Ha! I am pursuing the pre-hire letters. So far I have ONE. Incidentally, Prime, Wil-Trans , and Jim Palmer (affiliated w/Wil-Trans) all won't hire me because I don't have three years of previous driving record or proof of insurance. It's an insurance thing. But Swift is o.k. with it. They just want me to contact them again once I'm closer to the school start date. I was still four months away when I completed their application. Thank you for your concern re: payment to a private school, then possibly not being able to find work because of my 'situation.' Good news is, within the last hour-and-a-half I have another company interested, they know all about my circumstances, and should issue a pre-hire letter pending a background investigation, that will come back clean. (I'm a really good guy!) I'm also very loyal, and really want to stick with this school in Montana, because they've been so nice to me, are giving me a grant of 2 grand + 200 dollars, and have an excellent reputation. Rick, thank you for providing the links in your response; everyone I've met in this industry has been super-nice and very helpful. I love the comraderie that exists in this forum!

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Wil-Trans:

Darrel Wilson bought his first tractor in 1980 at age 20, but, being too young to meet OTR age requirements, he leased the truck out and hired a driver.

Through growth and acquisition, Wil-Trans now employs over 200 drivers, and has a long-standing partnership with Prime, Inc. to haul their refrigerated freight. The family of businesses also includes Jim Palmer Trucking and O & S Trucking.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More