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CRST

Topic 17652 | Page 1

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Patricia D.'s Comment
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First, thank you all for the information on companies who deal with automatics. Now, I have a company CRST who will train me again on 10 speed transmission to get the restriction removed. I love the idea of having a choice, but I know NOTHING about this company. Anyone??

Patricia D.'s Comment
member avatar

That part I am understanding, at least 10 months. I am wondering since I am just starting, and I have this restriction, would it be worth it to go ahead, get the restriction removed through them, get 10 months experience and then be able to pick another company once I am more experienced?

Tractor Man's Comment
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I'm sure there are other Companies that will do the same thing, let you go Solo, unless you want to team, and pay a bit better. I would make lots of phone calls. Good luck!

G-Town's Comment
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Here is the TT review on CRST: CRST review

Type CRST in the upper left hand corner of this webpage and press enter. The search will return any archived thread related to CRST.

Farmerbob1's Comment
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If you have a CDL already, you may want to talk to Schneider - they have been advertising refresher CDL classes on Sirius Radio in the last few months. They might also be able to help with manual transmission training for people with automatic transmission CDL restrictions. If they can't, they are a very large company, and might know another company that can help you.

Personally, I can't even think about working as a team for a living. The box is simply too damn small for two people. Getting through training was one of the mentally-hardest things I've ever done.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Take a look at this list of companies that have training programs:

Company-Sponsored Training Programs

CRST is one of the many companies in that group. Have a look through that list and read through the reviews on each one.

So you already have your CDL but you need to get trained in a standard transmission and retake the CDL exam to get the restriction lifted, correct? I just want to make sure we understand your situation.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Cold War Surplus's Comment
member avatar

I've been driving for CRST for about a year. Their training is first-rate. Here are the parts I wished I knew before coming on board:

1. Team driving is different. CRST has one of the longest average lengths of haul in the industry. Their trucks stop for diesel and D.O.T. 30's and that's about it. You will be trusting your life to a stranger though. One co-driver of mine wrecked the truck, totaled the trailer and got fired. Fortunately, I was not injured.

2. CRST doesn't have many terminals. If you live within driving distance of Cedar Rapids, IA; Oklahoma City, OK; Riverside, CA or Carlisle, PA it will be much easier for you to get home. I live in Washington so I spend days at a time parked at Riverside watching other drivers go home to see their families during their 34 hour resets, truck servicing, etc.

3. They don't track their trailers. You will spend hours driving from lot to lot looking for empty trailers that aren't there. I've spent entire driving 11 hour shifts looking for trailers, unpaid.

That said - I'm still driving for them. If you have any specific questions I'd be glad to answer them.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
3. They don't track their trailers. You will spend hours driving from lot to lot looking for empty trailers that aren't there. I've spent entire driving 11 hour shifts looking for trailers, unpaid.

To be clear, that applies to most companies. My entire career I always kept a notebook with a list of customer locations that I knew might have empty trailers available when I needed one. Many, many times I would drive past a row of bobtails waiting for dispatch to find them an empty and I'd head down the road to a customer, grab one, and be on my way to pickup the next load.

One co-driver of mine wrecked the truck, totaled the trailer and got fired. Fortunately, I was not injured.

WHOA! Thank God you were ok!

smile.gif

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Patricia D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks to all of you for the replies and yes Brett Aquila, you had it right, I have a Class A CDL with an E restriction, which is automatic only. But I am finding more and more companies willing to help thanks to all of you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Thanks to all of you for the replies and yes Brett Aquila, you had it right, I have a Class A CDL with an E restriction, which is automatic only. But I am finding more and more companies willing to help thanks to all of you.

Excellent. Make some phone calls, talk around, and see what kind of offers you get. Let us know how things progress. We're always happy to give any insights we can along the way.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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