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Cdl knowledge blessing and a curse lol

Topic 17660 | Page 2

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Tractor Man's Comment
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Kianin, Quick question, or you Rick, since you are both familiar with driving Busses. I remember somewhere in the Passenger endorsement sections, there is a valve that releases the spring brakes to move the Bus a short distance? Could this be what the OP was referring to when he stated the driver kept using the "Maxi"? Or did I just make that up out of thin air?

smile.gifthank-you.gif

K.R.'s Comment
member avatar

K, Thanks for the clarification. That is one thing I love about this forum. Drivers of different types of CMV's, all pitching in!

smile.gifthank-you.gif

You're welcome! (And of course, I have no clue what particular type of bus this shuttle is, or whatnot. There are numerous different manufacturers and each bus has a different config which makes driving a NABI different from driving a New Flyer different from an El Dorado… you get the picture.)

Also, one of the things that struck me about the OP—

Passenger comfort and safety when starting and stopping the bus are supposed to be a major, major concern. It's one of the reasons that at my company doing what was described (stopping the bus, using the parking brake rather than the service brake) is a major no-no, above and beyond the mechanical crap.

We also can get in trouble for hard braking etc. One of the first things that we learn, driving buses, is that hard braking causes falls (or in commuter type buses where all passengers are sitting down for the ride, whiplash!). And passenger falls are BAD.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Tastebuds's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

K, Thanks for the clarification. That is one thing I love about this forum. Drivers of different types of CMV's, all pitching in!

smile.gifthank-you.gif

double-quotes-end.png

You're welcome! (And of course, I have no clue what particular type of bus this shuttle is, or whatnot. There are numerous different manufacturers and each bus has a different config which makes driving a NABI different from driving a New Flyer different from an El Dorado… you get the picture.)

Also, one of the things that struck me about the OP—

Passenger comfort and safety when starting and stopping the bus are supposed to be a major, major concern. It's one of the reasons that at my company doing what was described (stopping the bus, using the parking brake rather than the service brake) is a major no-no, above and beyond the mechanical crap.

We also can get in trouble for hard braking etc. One of the first things that we learn, driving buses, is that hard braking causes falls (or in commuter type buses where all passengers are sitting down for the ride, whiplash!). And passenger falls are BAD.

The insight I gain from this forum is phenomenal. I can't wait until I can contribute more than the occasional joke. Even if that occasional joke is occasionally funny!

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

There's only one air brake button on a single unit CMV (like a bus) - remember that for your test too. There's a PARKING BRAKE BUTTON - and that's all - and it deactivates the spring brake.

As others have commented - I pop the brakes on my bus when at a stop light or other long wait - easier than keeping the brake pedal depressed. Hell - I put my car in park at stop lights, don't feel like holding the brake pedal. Nice in my current ride - pushbutton transmission.

In a COMBINATION VEHICLE - you have TWO BRAKE BUTTONS (valves).

TRAILER AIR (Red Stop Sign) - which supplies air to the trailer - including the suspension airbags, tire-inflation systems AND UNLOCKS THE SPRING BRAKES ON THE TRAILER. When you push this valve in - air is supplied to the trailer on the RED SUPPLY LINE. When you press the brake pedal (or use the johnson/trolley bar) air is supplied on the BLUE SERVICE LINE to actuate the brakes.

Tractor Parking Brake (Yellow Diamond) - which unlocks the spring brakes ON THE TRACTOR.

REMEMBER ON THE TRAILER - THE EMERGENCY/SPRING BRAKES ARE UNLOCKED WHEN YOU SUPPLY AIR TO THE TRAILER.

Rick

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Reaper's Comment
member avatar

Thats what i thought lol. I had a feeling he shouldnt be using the parking brake for that. And for jerkiness motions i kissed the bck of the seat in front me at least 8 times before leaving the parking lot.

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Maxi is just another name for spring brakes.

A few years ago I was riding a Jefferson Lines bus through N Dakota. In a construction zone, single lane, 65 mph. The car in front of us was tailgating the truck ahead of it, our driver was about 30 feet behind the car. I made the comment about being close to the car, she said we are fine. I then asked her what made her think she could stop 40k pounds in 30 feet. She backed off from the car. We could not go anywhere anyhow.

Reaper's Comment
member avatar

Im glad im not the only one rhat this affects. Unfortunetely due to my deiver speaks a different language i cant ask why he does that. I am morbidly curious as to why lol

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