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Flatbed Questions

Topic 17687 | Page 2

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Patrick R.'s Comment
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I can understand that, need more experience to get faster.

One thing I have noticed while looking at flatbed info online is they are saying that FB drivers that are CPM tend to lose quite a bit of money compared to DV or reefer as opposed to if you were a percentage based FB pay.. Anyone have any thoughts or input on this?

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Cold War Surplus's Comment
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Every driving specialty has its benefits or liabilities compared to the others. With flatbed you have to tarp loads then stop every two hours to ensure that they are properly secured. Almost never drop and hook. Easier to back or "ignore landscaping" at truck stops for parking. You can park in many places other drivers would get in trouble for since no one knows for sure that the steel cables on your fb aren't for the construction site down the road (try that with a dry van full of Cheese-its).

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Patrick R.'s Comment
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Lol cheese-its for the whole site! I am just curious if there's really a big difference in the money to be made (few hundred a week or more) or not. not a huge deal for me since I believe I would enjoy FB a lot more then just van. But its something worth knowing.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar
One thing I have noticed while looking at flatbed info online is they are saying that FB drivers that are CPM tend to lose quite a bit of money compared to DV or reefer as opposed to if you were a percentage based FB pay.. Anyone have any thoughts or input on this?

Percentage pay is just another way to come up with a number that allows the company to pay it's drivers a reasobable amount and still remain profitable. Recruiters use it as a gimmick to lure drivers into thinking they are going to make more money - it's not necessarily true. Some loads will net more on percentage pay, while others will net less. You have to realize that freight rates vary wildly depending on a lot of different factors. Your loads will all have different rates that they pay. So, 26% of three dollars a mile will be good money, but 26% of one dollar and thirty five cents will not be so good. Do you get the idea?

Another problem with percentage pay is that you don't get paid for dead head (empty) miles. If you deliver a load and then run 110 miles to the next place to pick up a load, guess what? If there's no load to calculate a percentage from... well, 26% of nothing is... let's see here, carry the zeros, add it all up - yep, that comes to nothing, nada, zip!

You can put percentage pay in the search bar at the top of this page and find a good many former conversations about it. I'm not a fan of the concept myself.

You also asked earlier about the time it takes to tarp. You do realize that most flat bed companies pay you a certain flat rate for tarping don't you? I generally have about $180 dollars on my weekly pay just for tarping. I have a bit of a special situation and probably get more than most flat bedders, but usually you are going to get paid around 45 dollars to tarp a load.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

As far as CPM at Prime, driving a lightweight truck in the refrigerated division pays more. I like the extra space of a full size tractor and there is tarp pay with flatbed. Making money at the end of the day is going to depend on you, not so much CPM.

A lot of times you'll be able to secure and tarp your load without starting your clock. As far as securing and tarping taking time, you have 11 hours in 14 that you can drive. So if your clock is running and you burn a couple hours you can still get your drive time in before your 14 runs out. You just gotta keep that left door shut when it's time to roll.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Patrick R.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks all :)

Always good hearing from ya OS you look at things a little different helps me do the same. Btw your week as a flatbedder post from ages ago...was amazing.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Tarping takes getting used to like everything else. When you 1st start out it may take a little longer. I can tarp a load in under an hour now. When I first started however it took years felt like. Once you've done a few of the same type of loads a few times it will get much easier.

Patrick R.'s Comment
member avatar

Tarping takes getting used to like everything else. When you 1st start out it may take a little longer. I can tarp a load in under an hour now. When I first started however it took years felt like. Once you've done a few of the same type of loads a few times it will get much easier.

Very nice! I think I'm pretty set on flatbed at this point in time, while I may be a bit out of shape now due to several years working a desk job, I am hoping that it will whip me back into shape, not necessarily lazy as I loved when I did some construction work...but I hate gyms.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Forgot to mention showering. You will get dirty sometimes. In the summer showering is needed much more due to sweating so much. You can shower as often as you want, however at times its better to park at the shipper or delivery location to set yourself up for the next run.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Young Gun's Comment
member avatar

I think you will be fine just don't be childish with ur learning curve and ask questions when u don't know and pay attention out there those longer loads will go to more experienced drivers they will not do that to u knowing u are inexperienced tarping is a task and if u don't find ur art to it will take u sum time at first which will eat up ur elog time but do not worry u will learn with time make sure u do not miss things and be safe but understand u are inexperienced and u will make mistakes but don't let it ruin a new career before it even starts and yes the best time to learnis in the winter because Ull see what the cold does to a tarp and ur body and yes u will lose weight I have lost 40lbs doing flatbed but eat healthy to stay away from truck stop food and u will have plenty of time for showers when u stop for tonight get u a rewards cards from each truck stop and swipe when u buy stuff from each place and when u fuel and u will earn free showers good luck to u hope to see u out there I live in nc as well and drive flatbed by the way best of luck to you tho.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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