Quick Thought

Topic 17702 | Page 1

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Gladhand's Comment
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Every time I have tried to save time whether it was not scaling, doing a half ass pre trip, not goaling when backing up, and doing other unprofessional things I end up wasting time.

This is a tip to new drivers and fellow rookies that have been at it for a few months or more. Cutting corners to save time leads to wasted time. Now I miss out on miles because I am at a terminal having to take extra classes and fill out paperwork.

I need to talk more with dm about miles because I been lucky to get past 1800 a week. It may be because of my accidents or slow freight, but either way I have wasted a lot of time due to me trying to save time. It takes less time to goal then it does take these classes. It takes less time to do a proper pretrip then to be put out of service or receive a citation that you have to jump through hoops just to pay the damn service fee. If you are getting complacent or lazy, use me as an example to not be. I am just grateful these incidents weren't life or career ending.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Great advice. Hope you get things straightened out to get more miles.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
I need to talk more with dm about miles because I been lucky to get past 1800 a week.

Hey, don't feel like that is PUNISHMENT, I have averaged 1800 miles per week with Swift over the last 6 months as well. I have had 100% on time pick ups/ deliveries, NO accidents, NO tickets, NO infractions of any type. We must have the same DM!!! I certainly hope my miles improve over the next 6 months, or I will be down the road. I don't think they could be much WORSE anywhere else!

confused.gifsmile.gif

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I need to talk more with dm about miles because I been lucky to get past 1800 a week.

double-quotes-end.png

Hey, don't feel like that is PUNISHMENT, I have averaged 1800 miles per week with Swift over the last 6 months as well. I have had 100% on time pick ups/ deliveries, NO accidents, NO tickets, NO infractions of any type. We must have the same DM!!! I certainly hope my miles improve over the next 6 months, or I will be down the road. I don't think they could be much WORSE anywhere else!

confused.gifsmile.gif

Before this I was averaging. 2500 or more give or take. I was running real good for October and November. I sat around quite a bit for the "busy" month of December. I'll just take it how it is for now.

Also before anyone comes on here to tell me about dedicated (this means you paul hahaha), due to my location OTR is all I have. I would have to move for those positions and I rather be rent free.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
sculpy's Comment
member avatar

Gladhand wrote:

If you are getting complacent or lazy, use me as an example to not be.

I understand why you said that, but I never viewed you as lazy, that's too damning. Maybe complacent, okay, but I guess part of the learning curve is realizing you can't be complacent for a second, ever. I've been following your journey from almost the start, and seeing a lot of myself in you, I've found your progress, drive and accomplishments very inspirational so far.

Every time you posted about a misstep, or losing heart briefly, my own worry would ratchet a notch! And every time you rallied, it inspired me again to know that I'll be able to do this job too. And you will; you clearly have all the right ingredients. You'll rally again and keep pushing forward, and you'll simmer into a very fine driver for as long as you want to follow that path.

Keep sharing your stories and thoughts! I can't wait to share the road with those of your ilk!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

You know Gladhand, I'm not driving for a carrier yet, but your words of advice is incredibly helpful and I have always had a GREAT respect for your advice. So don't be discourage heck I messed up on my offsets Saturday on my weekend class because I didn't want to ask for help to figure out how to lower the seat. What happened?, I got complacent, and knocked over the cones several times and your advice is exactly what I needed to hear.

I can't wait to read some of your success stories.

GOD BLESS YOU GLADHAND!!

Mr M's Comment
member avatar

I agree 100%. I didn't use to check tire pressure every pretrip I would just thump the tires. And stuff like that. luckily it never caught me but now I check everything every time. pretrip is the most important thing you can do.

sorry to hear about your miles. I'm driving a refer now and it has been steady 3500+. maybe the site OP can give you my email address.

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