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Another CR-England Help me what did I get into question.

Topic 17718 | Page 2

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John J.'s Comment
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I'm just curious How a tanker company that hauled milk/dairy is a competitor to CR-England. I could see maybe being a competitor in a line at a fuel point. As far as I know Cr does not have any tanker trucks and is in no way shape or form Hurt from me driving with them. Working for them was unBEARable.

Pete B.'s Comment
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I can bearly believe what I'm reading.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Most of the stuff you mention is just, well, trucking

See, that's the biggest problem right there and this is the millionth example we've seen of it over the years. Most of the stuff you talked about was just normal trucking stuff that every driver at every company goes through but you're so green you don't even realize that. Most of the rest of it was simply your lack of experience keeping you from knowing how to get situations resolved properly.

See, there isn't a trucking company out there that can survive if their trucks aren't being used efficiently. So if you're not getting good miles you have to figure out why that is. Talk to dispatch. Talk to the operations manager. Speak with other drivers. Find out what kind of miles the top performers are getting and ask them point blank why you're not getting those miles yourself. Maybe it's because they're breaking you in slowly. Maybe it's something to do with your performance or your attitude. Maybe your dispatcher isn't doing his/her job. That's part of what it takes to turn the big miles out there - not only do you have to do your job at the highest level, but you have to know how to communicate with the right people at your company when you have an issue that needs to be resolved.

And as far as your stereotypical slandering: "stay away from this company because they suck!" - then how do you suppose they got to be as big as they are? They wouldn't be making money if their trucks weren't turning big miles. They wouldn't be one of the largest refrigerated carriers in the nation if they couldn't keep any drivers. They have a hallway full of pictures of drivers that put in one million miles with the company, just like every major carrier has. If they're that awful then why did so many good drivers make a living there for a decade or more when they could have gone anywhere else they liked?

John, since you were so generous with your opinions of the company, why don't you help me understand some of the stuff I just mentioned? Because I just can't get the math to work out. They don't have good equipment, they don't have miles available, and yet they're one of the largest and most successful carriers in the nation. Help me understand how that could be.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I'm just curious How a tanker company that hauled milk/dairy is a competitor to CR-England

Come on, man. CR England invested the cash, equipment, and personnel it took to train you to get your CDL. They're not going to just let you take it elsewhere and make a living with it without paying them back.

Did that really need to be explained to you? To be honest, if you can't even figure out why they wouldn't want you making a living with the CDL they paid for without you paying them back first then I'm not that surprised things are going so badly right now.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm just curious How a tanker company that hauled milk/dairy is a competitor to CR-England. I could see maybe being a competitor in a line at a fuel point. As far as I know Cr does not have any tanker trucks and is in no way shape or form Hurt from me driving with them. Working for them was unBEARable.

OK - time for the kid gloves to come off.

You entered into a contractual obligation with CRE. You breached the obligation by quitting - regardless of the circumstances (and the bear screwing incident aside - we've heard of some real out-there stuff here at TT, and most of those folks here still figured out a way to hang in there), and in may cases - there's usually two sides of the story (bear story aside) and we've only heard YOURS.

Not going to argue here. These companies have had DECADES TO IRON OUT THEIR CONTRACTS - so you can be sure the NON-COMPETE APPLIES TO ANY JOB THAT REQUIRES THE CDL THAT YOU OWE THEM FOR THE TRAINING THEY GAVE YOU TO GET.

Now - as I mentioned previously - I believe CRE is one of the companies that will allow you to "work it off". Put on your best "smiley face", call them up - ask them HOW MUCH OF THE BALANCE OF YOUR TRAINING DEBT YOU OWE - and can you get a job with another carrier and setup a PAYROLL DEDUCTION PLAN with your new employer, in order to satisfy the debt.

Since you DROVE FOR THEM - you still have to USE THEM AS A REFERENCE - and any future employer is STILL REQUIRED TO CONTACT THEM.

If you get your DUCKS IN A ROW - you may be able to reach an amicable agreement with them, to satisfy the MONETARY CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATION YOU MADE - WHEN YOU SIGNED YOUR CONTRACT.

Complaining about how horrible they are will GET YOU NOWHERE HERE AT TT. We have members that HAVE WORKED FOR COMPANIES WITH THE WORST INTERNET REPUTATIONS - that have INVALIDATED MOST OF THE WHINEY BS you hear on the interwebs.

There's the best advice I can give you - and most here consider my advice to be PRETTY GOOD.

Take it or leave it...

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

I concur with Rickipedia.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

For the sake of my sanity, of which there is Bearly any left, I will make some popcorn, and let this play out. Good Night!

confused.gifdancing.gif

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Tractor bears (bares?) his soul. Touching.

Bolt's Comment
member avatar

What about the abandoned truck issue? After all he said he left it in a shop to get fixed and went home.

Brad O.'s Comment
member avatar

To you bear witness to all of this extracurricular activity?

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