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Pianoman's Comment
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Essentially - you pull about 5' past the hole (at 90 degrees to the hole) crank the wheel all the way over, and essentially "rotate" the tandems right into the hole. Quick pullup to straighten out - and bang.

Thanks I will absolutely try that tonight! Do you ever worry about damaging the trailer tires, frame, etc? I noticed when you turn real sharp like that it really puts a lot of strain on the tandems--not so much when empty, but definitely when loaded. These guys here don't really seem to care about that--maybe not that big of a deal?

Gotta be careful about those u-turns though. Jacknife it too far and the trailer actually start rolling BACKWARDS!! Haha

And hot damn I gotta try one of those Container Handlers!!

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Essentially - you pull about 5' past the hole (at 90 degrees to the hole) crank the wheel all the way over, and essentially "rotate" the tandems right into the hole. Quick pullup to straighten out - and bang.

double-quotes-end.png

Thanks I will absolutely try that tonight! Do you ever worry about damaging the trailer tires, frame, etc? I noticed when you turn real sharp like that it really puts a lot of strain on the tandems--not so much when empty, but definitely when loaded. These guys here don't really seem to care about that--maybe not that big of a deal?

Gotta be careful about those u-turns though. Jacknife it too far and the trailer actually start rolling BACKWARDS!! Haha

And hot damn I gotta try one of those Container Handlers!!

Paul I crack-the-whip on Wally Wagons all the time and never had a tire or suspension issue. They are designed to withstand side force like that, just don't go too fast doing it.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar
Paul I crack-the-whip on Wally Wagons all the time and never had a tire or suspension issue. They are designed to withstand side force like that, just don't go too fast doing it.

Ok thanks!

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks I will absolutely try that tonight! Do you ever worry about damaging the trailer tires, frame, etc? I noticed when you turn real sharp like that it really puts a lot of strain on the tandems--not so much when empty, but definitely when loaded. These guys here don't really seem to care about that--maybe not that big of a deal?

Gotta be careful about those u-turns though. Jacknife it too far and the trailer actually start rolling BACKWARDS!! Haha

And hot damn I gotta try one of those Container Handlers!!

That's the object. One side of the tandems are rolling one way, and the other side the other direction. The trailer rotates (or pivots if you will), on the tandem set. It's pretty cool the first time you see it, and you scratch yer head and go - WOW, didn't know it could move like that.

Doesn't strain the tandems at all - the wheels aren't on a straight axle - they can all turn independant of each other ("freewheel" - otherwise, you would scuff/drag them on tight turns).

Toploaders are SCARY. When I did my training, we were slinging around empties. Whole nother animal with 40K in the box. Ports stack the containers 4-6 high - that's SIX STORIES HIGH. Our "road test" was timed - pull 6 boxes off the stacks, put them on trailers (called "bomb carts") pull them off and put them back on the stacks. The toploader is like a forklift - only it lifts from the TOP (duh). You grab a container by locking the pins in the holes and lifting.

shipping containers stacked up at a port

Even though I have my operators card - I'd rather drive a spotter or forklift. The guys that run these day in/day out are FAST. But when accidents happen, they are MESSY - and potentially DEADLY.

stacks of shipping containers knocked over at a port

Didn't mean to hijack here.

Rick

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar
Essentially - you pull about 5' past the hole (at 90 degrees to the hole) crank the wheel all the way over, and essentially "rotate" the tandems right into the hole. Quick pullup to straighten out - and bang.

You mean more like 30-35' right? I tried 5' and it put me a couple spaces back from the one I was trying to set up for. Once I got the right distance though, yeah those tandems backed right in while I jacknifed it--beautiful!

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

With a container cart - about 5' out from the hole - and about 8-10' PAST it.

Once you figure out the distance that works for the trailer you're moving, just setup the same way every time. Works even in tight rows.

The alternative that takes a little more space - would be a "serpentine setup" - that pretty much makes it a 45 degree dock. Tractor wheels at the center of the spot, cut hard right, then hard left to straighten. Tandems should be lined up with the hole, at about 45 degrees. Little rotation then straight in.

Rick

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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