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Terminated after 3rd week of OTR Training

Topic 17756 | Page 2

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EnTee T.'s Comment
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Oh and I don't have anything against the company or the Mentor... just very dissapointed with how things were handled...

I've learned a whole lot during my tenure with them, which will help me progress with the new company.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

I know you have it your heart to do flatbed, however, maybe starting in dry van will be better for you. There are several companies that have both in their fleet. Perhaps starting in 1 then switching after you gain more experience. 2 companies that come to mind are Western Express and R E West. They are both based in TN. Western is based in Nashville and R E West in Ashland City.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar
With the backing, I went back to the CDL "school" to seek for some additional help. They tried to help as much as they could but they couldn't do much without a spread axle trailer.

Did you go to a private school - or did you get your CDL from this flatbed company? The reason I ask this is - are you obligated to them FINANCIALLY for your CDL, or did you pay to get it elsewhere?

Sounds like your primary difficulties, were that of backing a spread-axle trailer. EVERYONE finds backing to be the most difficult task, that takes the most time/experience to master - and as others have elaborated - spread-axles are the most difficult of all (versus regular old tandems).

I would start applying - and start applying NOW.

You are (as previously mentioned) going to have to use these folks as a reference. And really - since you didn't run anything over, or damage equipment (you didn't right?), you could probably be (somewhat) honest and say that you quit because they couldn't get a mentor to complete your additional training, AND that you were "falling short" on backing a spread axle and require MORE TRAINING.

You also want to get apps out and get onboard with someone QUICKLY - because if you are a RECENT GRADUATE of CDL school (again, I'm assuming private) and you only had 3 weeks OTR with the last company - you are still considered a RECENT GRADUATE, and you don't want to let the grass grow under your feet.

I'm not seeing that you'll have an issue getting a hire - unless of course - you WENT WITH THIS COMPANY BECAUSE YOU HAD PREVIOUS ISSUES WITH CRIMINAL BACKGROUND OR LICENSE ISSUES.

It sounds like this was a SMALLER COMPANY - as they didn't have the mentors or time to give you with a spread-axle on the TRAINING PAD, so you could work it a few days and get your skills up to snuff.

You still haven't mentioned WHO they were. And out of curiosity - why did you CHOOSE THEM over one of the other larger companies that have more training opportunities or could have moved you "laterally" into another division (Dry/Reefer) rather than just cut you loose?

I'm gonna take an educated guess - based on your posting history (about your pre-hires) and say you went with Boyd - as the other choices in your pre-hires were large enough they should have been able to deal with your training shortcomings rather than cutting you loose.

START APPLYING EVERYWHERE that takes recent grads and has flatbed (if you have your heart set on that).

KEEP US POSTED on how things progress for you.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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