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OMG So Conflicted but Flattered (training )

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Susan D. 's Comment
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Today I was asked by Safety to become a driver trainer. I balked, I hesitated, I told them to let me sleep on it, etc. etc. Then reluctantly agreed to at least try it.

I just don't know. I'm not awful at backing... I am competent, but I'm not perfect either. I've never hit anything and have always got the job done. Safety said they thought I would be excellent. My codriver shocked me. He seemed more but hurt than anything and kept asking if i was mad at him.

Safety reminded us that we could still team when we didn't have a student.

I need advice from a trainer (other than my codriver). Of course company policy is I have to be at West Side for 1 year so they're scheduling me for a trainer class in 2 weeks.

Kurt G.'s Comment
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Congratulations! You definitely should do it. Worst case, you train one student and decide it's not for you.

Rick S.'s Comment
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Really, the most important thing is, do you think you would enjoy sharing your knowledge with another?

I really enjoy teaching people things that I'm good at.

Another factor, obviously, is the relationship you are in. Will splitting up for you to do training, compromise your long-term relationship and goals?

The obvious other factor of course, would be financial. Can you do as well financially, (or better), by taking on the responsibility of training? We always tell people, if they're getting into training "just for the money", then they are doing it for the wrong reason. But it also doesn't make sense, to lose money from the position you're currently in, in order to do so.

They probably need to have some more female trainers, they can call on, for women who do not want to train with a man.

Teaching is a calling, it takes a certain temperament. Do you think you have the temperament? Are you able to communicate effectively? Are you patient enough to put up with idiots (for lack of a better term)? Are you willing to be a sleep in the bunk, with a total stranger rolling down the road holding your life in their hands?

Answer those questions, then get back to me. LOL.

Rick

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
George G.'s Comment
member avatar

Have you ever heard of the see one do one teach one.

While training you will be asked questions you may have never though of. You will have to evaluate and finely examine the proper ways of doing things. Its a win win if you approach it the right way.

Im a novice in the trucking world but in the communications world I have employed this technique to great success many times. If you are comfortable with the idea amd can work with many personalities I say go for it!

Good luck and have fun!

G-Town's Comment
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Sue, I have been asked to Mentor at Swift, twice in fact. I always give them the same answer; "it's not what I want to do". I'll train a new driver on the account, fine with that.

So ask yourself; "is this what you want to do?"

I think you already know the answer.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

G-Town's Comment
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George suggests:

Have you ever heard of the see one do one teach one.

While training you will be asked questions you may have never though of. You will have to evaluate and finely examine the proper ways of doing things. Its a win win if you approach it the right way.

Im a novice in the trucking world but in the communications world I have employed this technique to great success many times. If you are comfortable with the idea amd can work with many personalities I say go for it!

Good luck and have fun!

George this is completely different. A mentor or trainer is putting their life and possibly future career in the hands of a novice driver for weeks. Unless one is compelled and highly motivated to road train another driver, not something that should be agreed to under the slightest bit of duress.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I have a long history of educating and training, both patients and thheir families, through 20 years of healthcare service as well as training new hires in a warehouse /customer service and outbound forklift operation.

I love teaching others. I have a ton of patience as well.

Our motto in healthcare was se one, do one, teach one. I told safety while I'm not speedy gonzales at backing, I do take my time and try not to rush. They seemed happy with that.

West Side is getting inundated with new female applicants who will need training and there are currently only 3 female trainers. They were like.. "I don't know what information recruiting is giving to prospective female drivers, but we WANT them and we really need you to at least try this. We (safety mgmt) have discussed it and think you'll be great at it." Apparently they've had to delay orientation for some female applicants due to lack of female trainers. West Side does indeed love their lady drivers. They bluntly say statistics prove women are generally safer. After that, I finally accepted.

My hang up is.. 1 year of experience. Am I really qualified? I know some companies will allow trainers with only a few months experience, and that too me is absolutely frightening. I just don't want to let the new drivers down, as well as my company.

Relationship? It's all good and as Safety pointed out, we can continue to team when we don't have students. They will place us both with students at the same time, so when they test out, we can go back to teaming. I think it will be good for us. I can tell he misses training from time to time and we had previously discussed this very scenario, but didn't expect it this soon lol.

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

Sue, you've got a lot of experience teaching people in general it sounds like. The knowledge you're teaching, while varying in complexity between careers, is still being taught by you. So while you've only got that year OTR , if you're a safe driver and you enjoy teaching people well, I'd say go for it. By comparison, sticking me (22 yo) w/ 1 year of experience (which I'd be 23 by the time that happened) is... much sketchier. Just my two cents.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

George G.'s Comment
member avatar

George suggests:

double-quotes-start.png

Have you ever heard of the see one do one teach one.

While training you will be asked questions you may have never though of. You will have to evaluate and finely examine the proper ways of doing things. Its a win win if you approach it the right way.

Im a novice in the trucking world but in the communications world I have employed this technique to great success many times. If you are comfortable with the idea amd can work with many personalities I say go for it!

Good luck and have fun!

double-quotes-end.png

George this is completely different. A mentor or trainer is putting their life and possibly future career in the hands of a novice driver for weeks. Unless one is compelled and highly motivated to road train another driver, not something that should be agreed to under the slightest bit of duress.

Yes there are risks.

There are risks everytime you pull out onto that road. It ia my wish that someone who is competant and dedicated to their proffession as a true professional be guiding new drivers to success and not some jackwad whos just in it for the money.

I say only go for it if it is something the OP is COMFORTABLE with. If not its not like the OPs company would be unlikely to provide the OP the opportunity down the road had they a change of heart.

I may know nothing about the OPs capabilities but from what they stated I believe they are mindful and cautios in their approach to driving. A mentality that should be instilled in all professional drivers.

I believe the cold hard truth is try those the companies do to put competant, integral drivers behind the wheel of these massive machines, their screening process can only do but so much. The last line of defense, and possibly the most important, will be the field trainers.

One of the main reasons I looked for a decent site where I could receive valuable feedback from what I hope are outstanding safety concious drivers is to provide myself with a vital resource that I may bring questions and concerns that may imlact my safety and performance. The trucking industry is MASSIVE. I dare imagine you can spend an entire career in it and still learn something every day. That is intimidating.

G-town your response as always is informative and helpful. My posts did not mention the potential risks of harm wether to the poster themselves or their career. A good addage I believe.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Sue wrote:

My hang up is.. 1 year of experience. Am I really qualified? I know some companies will allow trainers with only a few months experience, and that too me is absolutely frightening. I just don't want to let the new drivers down, as well as my company.

I think you are qualified. More so after going through training. If this is what you want to do, the industry and your company will benefit from it. And so will you.

If they had doubt in your abilities, they wouldn't have asked you.

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