TruckingTruth logo

Scaling After Loading, And Why You Should Do It

Topic 18142 | Page 4

Page 4 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

If your weight goes way over what your BOL states (even if it's still legal) - would you report that to your DM?

Rates are charged by miles/weight. A 7K over the BOL, might entitle the company to more $$ on the load.

I see this on the docks all the time. Longshoremen's Union gets paid a tonnage percentage of every container moved. And every one they move, has a BOL with the weight on it. On any given day - they find the BOL's "shorted" by 1,000's of pounds. The Crane that moves the container has a scale built in - and they note the weight differences for each container. At the end of the day, the foreman gets a copy of the load sheets - and charges the shipping company the CORRECT WEIGHT accordingly.

I'm just wondering if the companies are LOSING $$ by getting overaged on the loads, and not charging for it. Company drivers probably wouldn't give a damn, but L/O's and others that are running on a percentage would.

Rick

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

Many of the bols I get state that the weights are subject to correction on them.

They are straight up telling you that you can't rely on the number they give.

On a completely different, but similar note, another driver was telling me he got an overweight ticket and that the reason he didn't scale waa he didn't realize that the weights printed in the bills was in kg not pounds. So it was heavier than he thought.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

I have 1 place I go that prints in kilograms. The person at the desk is nice and will convert it if you ask. I always ask, lol.

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

I have 1 place I go that prints in kilograms. The person at the desk is nice and will convert it if you ask. I always ask, lol.

Converting is easy. 1 kg is 2.2 lbs, so just multiply by 2.2, i.e. bills say 7800 kg, so multiply 7800 by 2.2, and you get 17160 lbs.

miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

I agree it is easy to convert, hell, Google will even do it for you. You just have to realize it needs to be done lol

Steve_HBG's Comment
member avatar

Whats a CHEP ?

CHEP is a "Commonwealth Handling Equipment Pool" company that manufactures and supplies through either rental or lease agreements pallets for the retail supply chains, like Walmart, Target, U.S. Foods, Sysco, and McLane, to name a few.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CHEP

As for scaling the load, I'd like to know each company's policy for scaling a load (i.e., is there a certain weight a load needs to reach before it becomes a requirement for the driver to scale it?).

Diver Driver's Comment
member avatar

Was just in Gloucester, N.J. and picked up a Del Monte banana load. Check this crap out.

1) 10 dollar truck entry fee. (Yep, to bring my truck on their property to haul their freight, I had to pay 10 bucks. Would be 30 bucks had I not had a TWIC card, or if I had a passenger who didn't have one.

2) Safety vest. If you don't have one, 5 dollar charge

I looked at the load notes and was instructed to make sure that the load is placed "single double single" because I'd most likely be over weight on my drives if I didn't. If your over weight and they have to rework..... 250.00 rework fee. (Yep, they screw up, you pay)

So....I go on the dock because it's a SLDC load. I go up to the guy and tell him "I'm not trying to tell you how to do your job, but I was instructed to request that you load me "single double single" his reply was "why are you telling me how to do my job?" "Go stand next to your door. "

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Sounds like a typical Jersey attitude! Oh Boy........... I'm gonna get it from Rainy now!

rofl-3.gifshocked.png

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Was just in Gloucester, N.J. and picked up a Del Monte banana load. Check this crap out.

1) 10 dollar truck entry fee. (Yep, to bring my truck on their property to haul their freight, I had to pay 10 bucks. Would be 30 bucks had I not had a TWIC card, or if I had a passenger who didn't have one.

2) Safety vest. If you don't have one, 5 dollar charge

I looked at the load notes and was instructed to make sure that the load is placed "single double single" because I'd most likely be over weight on my drives if I didn't. If your over weight and they have to rework..... 250.00 rework fee. (Yep, they screw up, you pay)

So....I go on the dock because it's a SLDC load. I go up to the guy and tell him "I'm not trying to tell you how to do your job, but I was instructed to request that you load me "single double single" his reply was "why are you telling me how to do my job?" "Go stand next to your door. "

Did Prime pay you back for the truck fee?

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Diver Driver's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Was just in Gloucester, N.J. and picked up a Del Monte banana load. Check this crap out.

1) 10 dollar truck entry fee. (Yep, to bring my truck on their property to haul their freight, I had to pay 10 bucks. Would be 30 bucks had I not had a TWIC card, or if I had a passenger who didn't have one.

2) Safety vest. If you don't have one, 5 dollar charge

I looked at the load notes and was instructed to make sure that the load is placed "single double single" because I'd most likely be over weight on my drives if I didn't. If your over weight and they have to rework..... 250.00 rework fee. (Yep, they screw up, you pay)

So....I go on the dock because it's a SLDC load. I go up to the guy and tell him "I'm not trying to tell you how to do your job, but I was instructed to request that you load me "single double single" his reply was "why are you telling me how to do my job?" "Go stand next to your door. "

double-quotes-end.png

Did Prime pay you back for the truck fee?

I'm sure they will. The receipt was scanned in with all the paperwork

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Page 4 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Hard Lessons Learned Trailers Truck Driving Stories Weight and Scales
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More