First Year Pay Totals With Prime

Topic 18162 | Page 5

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Rainy D.'s Comment
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Personally I like the flexibility. If I get tired I stop for a nap. If I'm hungry I stop. No one cares when I do something as long as I'm safe and early for appts. If I want extra.personal time before my next load I tell dispatch. No big deal.

In the beginning I did feel exhausted but that passed. Especially when I started napping for an hour or two in the middle of my drive shift. It breaks up the day. Running a 2500 mile load is less tiring than doing short loads. Often with short loads of 400-500 miles you can spend both 10hr beaks at the customer with broken sleep of waiting for a door...getting in the door...then loaded...getting out. Despite what dispatch sometimes thinks...this is all done on my break. Once rolling on a long load, I can stop or drive as much as I want.

Weeks differ, days differ. I've had 20hr days which legally are only supposed to be 14hrs. ....but then I've had 150 mike days where I could catch up on that sleep.

To me it is totally worth it. I have no "boss" watching over my shoulder...stop as little or as often as I want...and even get a thank you and good job from dispatch once in awhile. Totally different from the hell hole I spent most of my life at.

Also keep in mind it is more of a mental job than a physical one. The most exercise I get is winding the landing gear. But you need to be mentally alert at all times. You need to focus and not zone out. You need to anticipate the every move of idiots on the road.

The Transporter's Comment
member avatar

Also keep in mind it is more of a mental job than a physical one. The most exercise I get is winding the landing gear. But you need to be mentally alert at all times. You need to focus and not zone out. You need to anticipate the every move of idiots on the road.

Today I was driving Uber behind a flat bed trailer with a bulldozer and a ten foot pole sticking out of the back of the trailer. Being focused and anticipating that this knucklehead would drive under a low underpass not realizing that the pole might not make it probably saved my life. I kept my distance and sure enough that pole hit the bridge and snapped off and probably would have killed anyone that followed closer than I did. Of course he stopped and got out to look and laughed. I wont even begin to mention how this East Coast guy handles situations like this in a West Coast environment but needless to say..... It was a good day to be alive. Thank you Rainy for all your informative posts. 12 more days and I'm in SLC PRIME. good-luck-2.gif

Rainy D.'s Comment
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I'm too lazy for flatbed lol. But that idiot should have know the height and limits.

Less idiots to anticipate is one reason why night driving is easier for rookies lol

John P.'s Comment
member avatar

good-luck.gif good luck an good info

Personally I like the flexibility. If I get tired I stop for a nap. If I'm hungry I stop. No one cares when I do something as long as I'm safe and early for appts. If I want extra.personal time before my next load I tell dispatch. No big deal.

In the beginning I did feel exhausted but that passed. Especially when I started napping for an hour or two in the middle of my drive shift. It breaks up the day. Running a 2500 mile load is less tiring than doing short loads. Often with short loads of 400-500 miles you can spend both 10hr beaks at the customer with broken sleep of waiting for a door...getting in the door...then loaded...getting out. Despite what dispatch sometimes thinks...this is all done on my break. Once rolling on a long load, I can stop or drive as much as I want.

Weeks differ, days differ. I've had 20hr days which legally are only supposed to be 14hrs. ....but then I've had 150 mike days where I could catch up on that sleep.

To me it is totally worth it. I have no "boss" watching over my shoulder...stop as little or as often as I want...and even get a thank you and good job from dispatch once in awhile. Totally different from the hell hole I spent most of my life at.

Also keep in mind it is more of a mental job than a physical one. The most exercise I get is winding the landing gear. But you need to be mentally alert at all times. You need to focus and not zone out. You need to anticipate the every move of idiots on the road.

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

Show me one human being without issues lol ....... I envy you guys talking about life on the road and all the fun stuff you come across... I dream of one day go coast to coast in a big rig with one of you guys... Work with a lot of trucking companies and o/o all day every day all I do I at work is talk trucking Insurance and always scream at this guys about managing their drivers properly and keep they safer scores low. . What ever a driver does on the road we see.... tickets, maintenance history, overweight tickets, inspections dates and times and where they happen. So if anyone of you ever dream of becoming an o/o watch what you do out there.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I get asked to team all the time. I'm hesitant. I see couples do it successfully, but I saw a team.who were not romantically involved who after five years treated it like a divorce and argued over who was entitled to take what from the truck. I'm not sure I could team long term...but hey...ask me again if you come on the road lol

Of course...teaming with a hubby I could wake up for "manly" stuff such as putting chains on ...cranking a landing gear that is really tight, or backing into a tight space would be nice lol

As far as coast to coast...I have no desire to go west. Others want to stay there. Its funny that drivers tend to like certain areas that others find abhorrent. Only three states I haven't driver are OR, WA, SD. And I'd be very happy to never see CA again.

Huzul's Comment
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How long you been driving rainy? just wondering

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

As far as coast to coast...I have no desire to go west. Others want to stay there. Its funny that drivers tend to like certain areas that others find abhorrent. Only three states I haven't driver are OR, WA, SD. And I'd be very happy to never see CA again.

Yup I am the one that stays west haha. Surprisingly I have been avoiding the flooding and getting to places after a snowstorm or before it. I had a feeling when I first started that I would mainly run west, so I got used to running California. I was just in Compton the other day, one place a lot of people reject loads from haha.

Funny how it all works out like that. Still haven't been to the northeast and I am not in a hurry either. Shoot some of these border towns near Mexico have docks just as tight as the east does, along with shippers that are in areas a truck doesn't belong in.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Christian R.'s Comment
member avatar

Https://www.facebook.com/primeincreview/?hc_ref=PAGES_TIMELINE&fref=nf

This lovely lady posts her pay stubs from prime. Any thoughts on accuracy? I dunno Im headed to prime in two weeks. Just thought this might help people out.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

How long you been driving rainy? just wondering

Got my permit at prime Sept 21 2015. Drove 10k miles with that. Hot my CDL 10/30/15. I went solo Feb 15 2016.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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