First Year Pay Totals With Prime

Topic 18162 | Page 9

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I drive Swift version of the LW. Other notable differences, shorter wheelbase and a tighter turning radius (steer axle setback another 6" toward cab). I can maneuver this in rather tight spots that would be a tad more difficult in the longer Condo Sleepers. It will also scale legal with a 46k+ payload.

0505920001517608634.jpg

Squirrellyguns's Comment
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Thanks to everyone in this thread with both the questions and the detailed answers. It definitely helps put things in perspective financially. It also in certain restraint can give you an idea what to expect realistically, not from a recruiter mock up.

Reyn R.'s Comment
member avatar

Rainy, Thank you for breaking that down for me. Really helps out alot. I appreciate you going into detail about the differences. Makes my decision process so much easier. I have talked to two different recruiters and did the email back and forth for the last two weeks. I think I have a pretty good grasp on what I'm going to do, as long as the wife isnt to freaked out with me being gone 3-4 weeks

USMC AAV, try to explain to the Mrs that this separation time/sacrifice is only temporary if it is an obstacle. After 1-2 years you can request a dedicated local or regional gig. In the meantime, you develop all the necessary experience & skill to run those loads without screwing up like many rookies do. Good luck. I’ll be in Springfield for orientation on March 5th.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I drive Swift version of the LW. Other notable differences, shorter wheelbase and a tighter turning radius (steer axle setback another 6" toward cab). I can maneuver this in rather tight spots that would be a tad more difficult in the longer Condo Sleepers. It will also scale legal with a 46k+ payload.

0505920001517608634.jpg

i can scale 46k as well. go figure. have a maxed out beer load now.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I can scale 48+ish with my flatbed

USMC AAV's Comment
member avatar

This is the reason why this is my go-to site. Every time I have a question I get feedback that you really can't get from recruiters. A lot of times it isnt stuff that I would have thought of, or things that just are "good to know". The wheelbase is something I wouldnt have even dreamed of asking. but having you all explain it is does answer some other questions that i would have been asking sooner or later. (Thank you Rainy and G-Town)

On a side note, I did talk to Swift the other day also. They have a Walmart dedicated account that I could get into but they didn't seem to much information about it, or the recruiter was trying to steer me away from it. I mean he casually mentioned it and quickly left the subject alone. So I am not sure about that, but I hear G-Town talking about his route from time to time and I have to wonder. Granted I know not all jobs/locations are the same. Anyway thank you for filing in some of the grey areas!!

I drive Swift version of the LW. Other notable differences, shorter wheelbase and a tighter turning radius (steer axle setback another 6" toward cab). I can maneuver this in rather tight spots that would be a tad more difficult in the longer Condo Sleepers. It will also scale legal with a 46k+ payload.

0505920001517608634.jpg

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I cant speak for swift but i ran ONE dedicated walmart day of 4 stores in Maine and HATED it!!!! couldnt pay me enough to run one.

The pros: tandems and weights are balanced for you, some QC work is already done for you, can fuel at the DC, can park at any walmart or the DC, so you can shutdown at the last store, virtually no trip planning because it is all "get there ASAP". easy paperwork and no BOL. Its all WM to WM so more like manifests. Prime has showers and lounge at the DC., plus personal car parking for drivers. Backing at stores was less pressure due to being the only truck (but VERY tight and often very dark)

The cons: WM trailers are old and suck! Tight curvy back roads and if your trailer goes over a line, that puppy is rolling. There is no "get ahead of the load". Im always hours early. Having a trailer loaded at 2330 and an appt 50 miles away at 2300 sent me in a panic. every appt after that was piggybacked. tough backing or manuevering. My 30 min break was taken while the dock ppl were on lunch, but that store had no access for me to shop (weird store--dock was down a side road with a ravine between it and the store). Night, ice and snow in hilly curvy Maine...NOT fun. Four stores and 179 miles took me like 7 hours. With stop pay it worked out to about 85cpm....but totally not worth it as i could have driven longer and made more money OTR while relaxing on an interstate and having the freedom to stop and eat or pee if i want.

Funny thing is....different strokes for different folks. G Town is quite happy with his gig. I would have gone insane by day 2.

Did i mention WM trailers are crap? hahahahaade me.appreciate our trailers so much more.

Manifest:

Bill of Lading

An accurate record of everything being shipped on a truck, often times used as a checklist during unloading.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar
Did i mention WM trailers are crap? hahahahaade me.appreciate our trailers so much more

Must be a maine thing. Walmart trailers i got were always good. Only ones that sucked were the older reefers mainly because they had sealing problems, so the temperature would rise and i would have to wait for hours just for them to readjust everything.

Walmart is awesome and sucks haha. I got tired of the store peoples bad attitudes, but i see bad attitudes otr as well. Thing is dealing with disgruntled security is an every other day thing unlike the stores being everyday haha.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Reyn R.'s Comment
member avatar

This is the reason why this is my go-to site. Every time I have a question I get feedback that you really can't get from recruiters. A lot of times it isnt stuff that I would have thought of, or things that just are "good to know". The wheelbase is something I wouldnt have even dreamed of asking. but having you all explain it is does answer some other questions that i would have been asking sooner or later. (Thank you Rainy and G-Town)

On a side note, I did talk to Swift the other day also. They have a Walmart dedicated account that I could get into but they didn't seem to much information about it, or the recruiter was trying to steer me away from it. I mean he casually mentioned it and quickly left the subject alone. So I am not sure about that, but I hear G-Town talking about his route from time to time and I have to wonder. Granted I know not all jobs/locations are the same. Anyway thank you for filing in some of the grey areas!!

double-quotes-start.png

I drive Swift version of the LW. Other notable differences, shorter wheelbase and a tighter turning radius (steer axle setback another 6" toward cab). I can maneuver this in rather tight spots that would be a tad more difficult in the longer Condo Sleepers. It will also scale legal with a 46k+ payload.

0505920001517608634.jpg

double-quotes-end.png

The reason why the recruiter wasn't enthusiastic about WM dedicated for a rookie is the sheer amount of backing, squeezing, maneuvering, etc... It requires intense focus & patience. If you have the right attitude & temperament then I'd say go for it. It's very stable & home time is better than OTR (just my assumption). I'd ask G-Town directly & he'll give you the lowdown!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I cant speak for swift but i ran ONE dedicated walmart day of 4 stores in Maine and HATED it!!!! couldnt pay me enough to run one.

The pros: tandems and weights are balanced for you, some QC work is already done for you, can fuel at the DC, can park at any walmart or the DC, so you can shutdown at the last store, virtually no trip planning because it is all "get there ASAP". easy paperwork and no BOL. Its all WM to WM so more like manifests. Prime has showers and lounge at the DC., plus personal car parking for drivers. Backing at stores was less pressure due to being the only truck (but VERY tight and often very dark)

The cons: WM trailers are old and suck! Tight curvy back roads and if your trailer goes over a line, that puppy is rolling. There is no "get ahead of the load". Im always hours early. Having a trailer loaded at 2330 and an appt 50 miles away at 2300 sent me in a panic. every appt after that was piggybacked. tough backing or manuevering. My 30 min break was taken while the dock ppl were on lunch, but that store had no access for me to shop (weird store--dock was down a side road with a ravine between it and the store). Night, ice and snow in hilly curvy Maine...NOT fun. Four stores and 179 miles took me like 7 hours. With stop pay it worked out to about 85cpm....but totally not worth it as i could have driven longer and made more money OTR while relaxing on an interstate and having the freedom to stop and eat or pee if i want.

Funny thing is....different strokes for different folks. G Town is quite happy with his gig. I would have gone insane by day 2.

Did i mention WM trailers are crap? hahahahaade me.appreciate our trailers so much more.

You ran one Wally load? Good grief Rainy, never knew that.

Okay you had an old trailer, some are, most aren't. Even the old ones are well maintained. The reefers; most are less than 5 yrs old.

Second; after completing a 179 mile 4-stop load and I am back at the D.C. grabbing a 1-2 stop short run to maximize my 14 hour clock and get the mileage over 300 total for the day. At my rate that's about $270 for the day.

You are right though different strokes; but it takes a lot more than one run to understand how the account works and how-to make money at it.

And the 46+k load I mentioned with the SLUF was pushing 47, I recall something like 46,700... My mistake.

Manifest:

Bill of Lading

An accurate record of everything being shipped on a truck, often times used as a checklist during unloading.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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